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-   -   Accessories For Bikes? Newbie :-) (http://www.bikeforums.net/general-cycling-discussion/924181-accessories-bikes-newbie.html)

asuna 11-28-13 10:23 PM

Accessories For Bikes? Newbie :-)
 
First of all, I am new to cycling. Getting my first bike tomorrow and am extremely excited. I was pricing accessories at my local bike store and some of the prices made my jaw drop. Would my local sporting goods store be sufficient for accessories? What about Walmart?

Also, what are some of the things you guys carry with you while your riding?

I want to ride for exercise so this won't be a means for transportation for me. No, I haven't gotten a bicycle rack to put on my SUV yet. I just thought I could put my bike in my trunk for now. I will be bicycle poor until my next paycheck, lol. Of course there's always credit cards but I don't wanna go there. I do want some bags to place on my bike though, for my phone, water bottle, etc. My hubby just looked at me like I'm crazy and said we could just haul backpacks but wouldn't that be uncomfortable while riding? Hmmm...decisions.

Retro Grouch 11-29-13 06:15 AM

Most times I just carry my wallet, cellphone and enough stuff to fix one flat tire. I have a water bottle cage on my bike. Unless you need to carry a bunch of junk with you, a fanny pack will probably be big enough and a little more comfortable to wear than a back pack.

Solid_Spoke 11-29-13 08:17 AM

Get a water bottle cage, a taillight and front light, extra tubes. Have fun :)

asuna 11-29-13 10:03 AM

Thank you guys for responding. Just got our bikes... Sooooooo excited!!! We had the local bike shop put 2 water bottle cages on each bike. Now, we are heading to wally world to get some accessories like helmets, gloves, etc. Woohoo... Can't wait to start riding! :)

wahoonc 11-29-13 11:08 AM

I carry the same stuff in my pockets that I would if I were walking. Every one of my bikes has a small on board repair kit for that specific bike; replacement tube, patch kit, mini-pump and the right sized wheel wrench. I have a Park MTB-3 Rescue Tool that I put in my pocket or the bike bag.

Aaron :)

SkyDog75 11-29-13 12:18 PM

Congrats and enjoy!

Like a lot of other people, I've got a small saddle bag with stuff I'd need to fix a flat tire plus a basic multi-tool in case of mechanical emergency. And a helmet.

Here's a quick rundown of a typical saddle bag and its tire-fixing contents:

* A saddle bag like this Serfas Speed Bag. A "small" one will carry your tire-fixing stuff. Move up to a bigger size and you can probably stuff a small wallet and phone in there, too.

* Spare innertube (because it's quicker and simpler to swap a tube than patch one on the road).

* Vulcanizing patch kit like the ones sold by Rema or Park Tool (because it sucks to walk when you get a second flat tire).

* I carry a CO2 inflator in my road bike's saddle bag, but keep a mini pump on my other bikes, like the one I ride with my kids. Topeak, Serfas, and Lezyne make good ones. The right one for you would depend on what size tires you're using. Road bikes with skinny tires need high pressure, which some pumps can't manage. Bikes with fatter tires don't need as much pressure, but need lots of volume, which can take forever to attain using a pump made for high pressure.

* Basic multi-tool like this Park Tool MT-1. There are a whole bunch of other options in various shapes and sizes. I like the ones I have from Park Tool and Crank Brothers.


Another accessory I use on occasion are a rack and panniers. Sometimes I go riding with my daughters and need to haul some stuff for the trip -- lunches, extra water, ball gloves, medical supplies, etc. I hate wearing a backpack when I ride, so I mounted this rack and use a set of panniers (bags) similar to these. They also make it practical to use the bike for errands like trips to fetch a few things from the store.

jsdavis 11-29-13 01:22 PM

If you bought a hybrid, mountain, or somewhat upright bike, backpacks are ok for a few miles, but I wouldn't do it on the road bike. I find that after about 8 miles they start to get uncomfortable due to the weight if I'm going somewhat fast my clothing gets all wet. On my road bike, I'd say 2 or 3 miles tops with a backpack.

Once I put a rack on my road bike so that I could carry my commuting gear, I realized it was something I shoulda done a long time ago and I went and put one on my hybrid too. Getting the weight off my back made a huge difference comfort wise. If you don't want bicycle specific bags, you could put a basket on the rack or the bars and put your backpack in there too. Wald folding basket has been around forever. They hold up to one paper grocery bag open and close to 1".

fietsbob 11-29-13 01:50 PM

With Panniers I go grocery shopping..

In Bike Shops, when you buy the bike, any accessories are knocked down 10% and installed Gratis.

if all done at that Point-of-sale.

Backpacks are uncomfortable , and more so in the hot Humid summer .

your back skin cools you a lot as your sweat,


(or 'the vapors', perhaps, Scarlett..) evaporates..

Doug5150 11-29-13 02:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by asuna (Post 16287170)
First of all, I am new to cycling. Getting my first bike tomorrow and am extremely excited....

Like, first bicycle ever? Do you know how to ride a bicycle?....

Ummm, anyway.
Baskets are better for carrying odd-sized stuff conveniently than touring-style bags are. Backpacks can be used while riding a bicycle but they generally don't work well.

A rear rack can hold smaller bags (they make rectangular bags that strap down to the rack).

Puncture-resistant tires make casual bicycling a lot more casual, by way of not needing to stop and fix flat tires. The Schwalbe Marathon Plus tires are good (but not cheap) or the CST Salvo tires are cheaper if you have a 26"-wheel bike.

A cheaper bicycle multi-tool isn't a bad idea,,,, except that I think most of the time I hear a new rattle when riding, when I get off to check what's happening,,,, either the bolt or the nut holding something on is already long gone so there is nothing left for me to tighten.
Oh well.
The plan has worked a few times I suppose. You can find cheaper multi-tools for $20.

......

Your butt's gonna hurt. Like, after the first day, you may not want to ride again for a week. This is typical when starting out.
A decent brand of cycling shorts will help quite a lot. Figure on spending at least $75 a pair, but you only need one pair to start. You don't need any other bicycle-specific clothes to start out. (also..... cycling shorts are worn with no underwear)
Part of it is just getting used to being on the bike.
And part of it is not staying on the bike too long at any one time. A lot of club rides take 10-15 minute breaks every 60 minutes, to "rest their legs" and get a break from the butt pain. ;)



IF you find that you desire to take multi-hour rides without suffering from seat, neck or hand pain, then it is worthwhile to explore recumbent bikes. That's a long ways off right now though.

xtrajack 11-29-13 03:39 PM

Bicycle accessories are a rather personal kind of thing.
You can go low cost, light duty, good for one time use, clear up to what ever you care to spend for high quality, lightweight, bullet proof gear.

My first purchases were:
water bottle
padded cycling gloves
tool kit
frame mounted pump & tube
patch kit
seat bag

Wilfred Laurier 11-29-13 03:42 PM

i reccomend

a small multi tool
a mini pump or co2 inflator
a spare tube or patch kit
a bag to carry all the above

and

a decent floor pump you keep at home for regular
non emergency
inflating

Dudelsack 11-29-13 03:57 PM

Good advice, generally.

BTW, even though cycling clothing can appear random or off the wall, it almost always serves a purpose.

In my jersey back pockets, I stuff a little case from Innovations that has a CO2 inflator, two spare cartridges, a patch kit and two tire levers. I also carry one spare tube, my cellphone, and a snack. That's all I really need for day rides.

As mentioned, you'll need a floor pump.

asuna 11-29-13 04:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Doug5150 (Post 16288392)
Like, first bicycle ever? Do you know how to ride a bicycle?....

Ummm, anyway.
Baskets are better for carrying odd-sized stuff conveniently than touring-style bags are. Backpacks can be used while riding a bicycle but they generally don't work well.

A rear rack can hold smaller bags (they make rectangular bags that strap down to the rack).

Puncture-resistant tires make casual bicycling a lot more casual, by way of not needing to stop and fix flat tires. The Schwalbe Marathon Plus tires are good (but not cheap) or the CST Salvo tires are cheaper if you have a 26"-wheel bike.

A cheaper bicycle multi-tool isn't a bad idea,,,, except that I think most of the time I hear a new rattle when riding, when I get off to check what's happening,,,, either the bolt or the nut holding something on is already long gone so there is nothing left for me to tighten.
Oh well.
The plan has worked a few times I suppose. You can find cheaper multi-tools for $20.

......

Your butt's gonna hurt. Like, after the first day, you may not want to ride again for a week. This is typical when starting out.
A decent brand of cycling shorts will help quite a lot. Figure on spending at least $75 a pair, but you only need one pair to start. You don't need any other bicycle-specific clothes to start out. (also..... cycling shorts are worn with no underwear)
Part of it is just getting used to being on the bike.
And part of it is not staying on the bike too long at any one time. A lot of club rides take 10-15 minute breaks every 60 minutes, to "rest their legs" and get a break from the butt pain. ;)



IF you find that you desire to take multi-hour rides without suffering from seat, neck or hand pain, then it is worthwhile to explore recumbent bikes. That's a long ways off right now though.

Haha Doug, I was in a hurry when I typed the above. :rolleyes: I meant to say it's my first bike since I was a teenager. I'm in my early 30's now. So, it has been quite a while since I rode.

Thanks for all the great advice on what accessories to get. I rode 7K today and you aren't kidding about the butt hurting. OUCH! I keep wanting to stand up (like I do in spin class) while I'm riding but find this extremely hard to do while I'm on an actual bike. Hmmm...hopefully I will get used to it.


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