Bike Forums

Bike Forums (http://www.bikeforums.net/forum.php)
-   General Cycling Discussion (http://www.bikeforums.net/general-cycling-discussion/)
-   -   Today's lesson was 28mm slicks, ice & snow don't get along to well!!!! (http://www.bikeforums.net/general-cycling-discussion/926768-todays-lesson-28mm-slicks-ice-snow-dont-get-along-well.html)

UnfilteredDregs 12-19-13 02:27 PM

Today's lesson was 28mm slicks, ice & snow don't get along to well!!!!
 
I, err... was practicing my "ice handling skillz," yup, that's the ticket, I meant to unceremoniously land on my ass whilst skittering about the bike paths. :cry:

On a positive note... BIBS!!!! WHERE HAVE YOU BEEN ALL MY LIFE!!! HOW I LOVE THEE!!!!! :love:

Little Darwin 12-19-13 02:45 PM

As a lad I used to ride in snow and ice, but as I aged I developed a sense of mortality.

I do recall it being a bit of an adventure delivering newspapers, especially because the thing I usually did when losing balance at low speed was to put down a foot, which did little good on ice.

The good part (at least where/when I grew up) is that the cars slowed down significantly when driving on packed snow and ice, so I was probably actually safer than during dry weather. And as I think about it now... if you have to fall, it is nice to not worry about road rash!!!

And I agree on the bibs!!!

MEversbergII 12-19-13 02:46 PM

I discovered this yesterday with my 23's. The spot I slid yesterday was actually worse this morning, but this time I had the foresight to dismount and walk around it.

M.

DataJunkie 12-19-13 03:18 PM

I know a rider who swears up and down that riding 23mm tires in the snow is the preferred method. Said person also crashes quite a bit.
I prefer my cross or mountain bike. A fat bike looks like a blast if we ever had a decent amount of snow.

ThermionicScott 12-19-13 03:59 PM

I guess everyone has to learn this for themselves... :innocent:

Greg M 12-19-13 06:00 PM

I have to go to work everyday. If I break something I don't work . Studded snow tires , nuff said.

UnfilteredDregs 12-19-13 10:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ThermionicScott (Post 16344041)
I guess everyone has to learn this for themselves... :innocent:


I touched the stove when I was little...twice. :lol:

ThermionicScott 12-19-13 11:10 PM

:lol:

Leebo 12-20-13 10:00 AM

We use studded tires here in New England, they work well. Cheaper than a collar bone.

UnfilteredDregs 12-20-13 10:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Leebo (Post 16345945)
We use studded tires here in New England, they work well. Cheaper than a collar bone.


What is it about cycling wrecks & collar bones? Seriously, what makes riders prone to breaking them in a wreck?

MEversbergII 12-20-13 10:26 AM

I am also curious. Every time I land on something, it's typically my ribs.

M.

prooftheory 12-20-13 11:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by UnfilteredDregs (Post 16346038)
What is it about cycling wrecks & collar bones? Seriously, what makes riders prone to breaking them in a wreck?

In a regular slide-out you land on your side, often striking your shoulder against the ground. All the other bones are more or less parallel with the ground when they strike. The collar bone is perpendicular. The hip bone is also somewhat perpendicular to the ground but it is much less fragile. This question is a little like asking why people end up with road rash on their thighs.

UnfilteredDregs 12-20-13 11:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by prooftheory (Post 16346198)
In a regular slide-out you land on your side, often striking your shoulder against the ground. All the other bones are more or less parallel with the ground when they strike. The collar bone is perpendicular. The hip bone is also somewhat perpendicular to the ground but it is much less fragile. This question is a little like asking why people end up with road rash on their thighs.

Makes sense...Although I went flying with my arms out yesterday...

Leebo 12-23-13 10:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by UnfilteredDregs (Post 16346038)
What is it about cycling wrecks & collar bones? Seriously, what makes riders prone to breaking them in a wreck?

In mountain biking, people fall with their outstretched arms and the force transmits to the collarbone. Need to practice the shoulder roll.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:15 AM.