Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 26
  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    44
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    How to raise handlebars on bike? Other thoughts on converting mtn bike to hybrid.

    I am converting an old-school mountain bike to a hybrid-type bike. The bike is a Bridgestone MB-3 I bought new in 1994. This is a steel-framed mountain bike with a rigid fork. I donít really ride this bike off road any more. Most riding is on paved surfaces or hard-packed dirt paths. So Iím making some changes to get it to be more comfortable for my riding style.

    So far I have replaced the seat with a more ergonomic/comfortable saddle. That has been a great help. Next, I replaced the wide knobby-type tires with Continental Town and Country tires. Great improvement Ė the bike is now faster, quieter, and smoother.

    My only complaint now is too much of my weight is on my wrists. Itís uncomfortable after a half hour and really uncomfortable after 3 hours. My guess is I simply need to raise the handlebars so more of my weight is on my seat instead of my wrists. Does that sound correct?
    If that is the case, what is the least expensive way to do so? Bike has a threaded headset and I already moved it to the top of the range but itís still too low since half my weight is on my wrists. Would a device like this be what I need?

    http://www.amazon.com/Summit-Quill-S...rds=stem+riser

    Iíd love feedback. The more the better!

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Northern Nevada
    Posts
    3,749
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have a '94 MB-3, too, and sort of the same problem--it was too small the day I bought it, but I was blinded by desire....
    I eventually replaced the stem, which is what you SHOULD do. Rivendell, www.rivbike.com, is one place to get tall stems. They can be pretty expensive, though. The riser you showed will certainly work, and it's inexpensive enough. I'd be a little nervous about putting a cheap piece of unknown quality in such a critical spot, but if it's what you can afford, it's what you can afford. But look here first. Riv's stuff is pricey, but they don't sell junk: http://www.rivbike.com/Nitto-Stems-s/108.htm

  3. #3
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    St Peters, Missouri
    My Bikes
    Rans Enduro Sport, Hase Kettweisel Tandem, Merin Bear Valley beater bike
    Posts
    23,975
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Red Rocker Redo.jpgThree words: Nitto Technomic Stem. That'll give you a couple of inches which, when you're doing handlebar adjustments, is a lot. The picture shows you what one looks like.

    You'll have to re-cable your bike. Your existing cables and housings will almost surely be too short and you'll have to remove the shifter and brake lever from one side anyway to move the handlebar to your new stem. Probably need new cables with the stem riser too.

    Technomic stems come in different reach sizes too. As you raise your handlebar it will also move closer to you. Think about where you want your hands to be. The old school rule of thumb is the handlebar should block your view of the front hub. If it was my bike, I'd just keep messing with the handlebar until I was happy with how the bike feels and not worry too much about what anybody else has to say.
    My greatest fear is all of my kids standing around my coffin and talking about "how sensible" dad was.

  4. #4
    Rides Majestic
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Westfield, MA
    My Bikes
    1983 Univega Gran Turismo, 1970 Schwinn Super Sport, 2001 Univega Modo Vincere, Self-Built Nashbar Touring, 1974 Peugeot U08, 1974 Atala Grand Prix, 1986 Ross Mt. Hood, 80's Maruishi MT-18
    Posts
    1,155
    Mentioned
    12 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If I'm understanding you correctly, you are keeping the original bars and not going to drop bars? If that is the case, save yourself some $$ and go for one of these:http://www.jensonusa.com/!bOShEr4H5u...FbB9OgodVmkAsg. They look great on a vintage mountain bike and give lots of rise. They also have a drilled cable stop for your front cantilever brakes if you need it. If raising the bars is not enough, then I would try a "northroad" style handlebar. The sweep of the bar will place your wrists in a more neutral position. Good luck.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    North of Boston
    My Bikes
    Kona Dawg, Surly 1x1, Karate Monkey, Rockhopper, Crosscheck , Burley Runabout,
    Posts
    2,115
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Riser handlebars come in 1", 2" and 4" heights for starters.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Wilfred Laurier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    1,986
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    before you change anything
    you should know that most often
    handlebar position is not the cause of excess weight on the hands

    most often
    excess weigh on the hands is caused by
    and can be alleviated by an adjustment of
    the saddle position

    a saddle tilted nose down
    even a little bit
    is the most common cause of excessive weight loaded on the hands

    if your saddle is uncomfortable when perfectly level
    or even slightly nose up
    then you either need a new saddle
    or the saddle is too high

  7. #7
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    St Peters, Missouri
    My Bikes
    Rans Enduro Sport, Hase Kettweisel Tandem, Merin Bear Valley beater bike
    Posts
    23,975
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by likebike23 View Post
    If I'm understanding you correctly, you are keeping the original bars and not going to drop bars? If that is the case, save yourself some $$ and go for one of these:http://www.jensonusa.com/!bOShEr4H5u...FbB9OgodVmkAsg. They look great on a vintage mountain bike and give lots of rise. They also have a drilled cable stop for your front cantilever brakes if you need it. If raising the bars is not enough, then I would try a "northroad" style handlebar. The sweep of the bar will place your wrists in a more neutral position. Good luck.
    Oops, I just changed my opinion. That's the one I'd go with too.
    My greatest fear is all of my kids standing around my coffin and talking about "how sensible" dad was.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    44
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks so much for this feedback. My saddle is perfectly flat. I guess I don't understand how my saddle angle would control how much weight is on my wrists. I'm pretty bent over when I grab my handlebars. Please see attached picture.

    bridgestone.jpg
    Quote Originally Posted by Wilfred Laurier View Post
    before you change anything
    you should know that most often
    handlebar position is not the cause of excess weight on the hands

    most often
    excess weigh on the hands is caused by
    and can be alleviated by an adjustment of
    the saddle position

    a saddle tilted nose down
    even a little bit
    is the most common cause of excessive weight loaded on the hands

    if your saddle is uncomfortable when perfectly level
    or even slightly nose up
    then you either need a new saddle
    or the saddle is too high

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    44
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Okay guys. $15 is certainly in my budget.

    Now that you see the picture in post #8 what is your advice? Should I buy a stem riser for $12 and use my existing stem? Or should I buy a new stem with a longer neck (is that the correct term?) for $15 or $20?

    Regarding sizing - this is the correct size bike for me. When I stand above the top tube with feet flat on the ground I have about 1.5 or 2 inches of clearance. The seat is also correctly adjusted - my leg is almost completely straight at the bottom of the stroke. So the only thing I can think to adjust is the handlebar height. Feedback appreciated!

    Also, how do I measure what width I need? Is it a standard size?

  10. #10
    7-speed doomsday prepper ThermionicScott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    CID
    My Bikes
    1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX
    Posts
    8,911
    Mentioned
    12 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by draco_m View Post
    Now that you see the picture in post #8 what is your advice? Should I buy a stem riser for $12 and use my existing stem? Or should I buy a new stem with a longer neck (is that the correct term?) for $15 or $20?
    I'd still buy the Kalloy. They're cheap and good.

    Regarding sizing - this is the correct size bike for me. When I stand above the top tube with feet flat on the ground I have about 1.5 or 2 inches of clearance. The seat is also correctly adjusted - my leg is almost completely straight at the bottom of the stroke. So the only thing I can think to adjust is the handlebar height. Feedback appreciated!
    Having 2" of clearance to the top tube when you stand over the bike doesn't automatically mean it's the right size (since standing over a bike isn't a part of actually riding the thing), but you're probably in the ballpark.

    A saddle that has the nose tilted down causes the rider to slide forward ever so gradually. Having to constantly push back with the hands to correct your positioning is what Wilfred was referring to.
    Quote Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
    There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
    RUSA #7498

  11. #11
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    3,134
    Mentioned
    45 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Those steel tube stem riser work OK ,, I used one to do a threaded to threadless conversion
    the lower OD is 7/8" the upper ID is 7/8",the outer is 1" , so a common shim to use a 9/8" stem works fine.

    there are tall Quill adjustable angle stems as well ..

  12. #12
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    St Peters, Missouri
    My Bikes
    Rans Enduro Sport, Hase Kettweisel Tandem, Merin Bear Valley beater bike
    Posts
    23,975
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    1. Before doing anything, carefully measure in millimeters the diameter of your stem where it enters the headset. (If you don't have a caliper, gently clamp a crescent wrench around the shank and measure between the jaws. If it's not 22.2 mm, forget trying to find a riser stem and just go for the stem riser.
    2. You might be tempted to skip re-cabeling your bike but I wouldn't. You really need to have enough slack in your cables to allow you to turn your handlebar all the way from one side to the other.
    3. Just looking at your bike, I suspect it's a bit small for you. Measure from your seat to the ground and from your handlebar to the ground. Casual cyclists generally like their handlebar even or even a little higher than their saddle. Grant Peterson, who designed that bike, is a vocal proponent of the handlebar even with saddle school of thought. More than a couple inches of difference = a racer boy fit.
    My greatest fear is all of my kids standing around my coffin and talking about "how sensible" dad was.

  13. #13
    Rides Majestic
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Westfield, MA
    My Bikes
    1983 Univega Gran Turismo, 1970 Schwinn Super Sport, 2001 Univega Modo Vincere, Self-Built Nashbar Touring, 1974 Peugeot U08, 1974 Atala Grand Prix, 1986 Ross Mt. Hood, 80's Maruishi MT-18
    Posts
    1,155
    Mentioned
    12 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Your seatpost doesn't look excessively high for a mountain bike. I wouldn't worry that the bike is to large/small based on what I'm seeing. Lots of early mountain bikes were setup with an aggressive position (lots of drop between the saddle and bars). Seriously, just go with the Kalloy stem I linked to. Those extenders are goofy (picture the 40 year old virgin), furthermore, it's never going to be as strong as the Kalloy stem either. Get the silver one and you'll be good to go. The suggestion to recable the bike is valid too. When you raise the bars it's going to pull the slack from the system. Try the stem and see first, it may not be absolutely necessary.

  14. #14
    Humvee of bikes =Worksman Nightshade's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    5,302
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by draco_m View Post
    I am converting an old-school mountain bike to a hybrid-type bike. The bike is a Bridgestone MB-3 I bought new in 1994. This is a steel-framed mountain bike with a rigid fork. I don’t really ride this bike off road any more. Most riding is on paved surfaces or hard-packed dirt paths. So I’m making some changes to get it to be more comfortable for my riding style.

    So far I have replaced the seat with a more ergonomic/comfortable saddle. That has been a great help. Next, I replaced the wide knobby-type tires with Continental Town and Country tires. Great improvement – the bike is now faster, quieter, and smoother.

    My only complaint now is too much of my weight is on my wrists. It’s uncomfortable after a half hour and really uncomfortable after 3 hours. My guess is I simply need to raise the handlebars so more of my weight is on my seat instead of my wrists. Does that sound correct?
    If that is the case, what is the least expensive way to do so? Bike has a threaded headset and I already moved it to the top of the range but it’s still too low since half my weight is on my wrists. Would a device like this be what I need?

    http://www.amazon.com/Summit-Quill-S...rds=stem+riser

    I’d love feedback. The more the better!
    A simple way to raise your bars..........
    http://www.amazon.com/Wald-Hi-Rise-S...ndlebar+risers
    My preferred bicycle brand is.......WORKSMAN CYCLES
    I dislike clipless pedals on any city bike since I feel they are unsafe.

    Originally Posted by krazygluon
    Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
    Aluminum: barely a hundred, which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?

  15. #15
    PatronSaintOfDiscBrakes dynaryder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    dropped and lost in Washington DC
    Posts
    6,226
    Mentioned
    11 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by draco_m View Post
    I guess I don't understand how my saddle angle would control how much weight is on my wrists. I'm pretty bent over when I grab my handlebars.
    It's possible your saddle is too far back. This could cause you to have to lean too far forward and put more weight on your wrists. Check your fore/aft adjustment with this pic:
    fit_plumb_bob_06_t.gif

    With one of your cranks pointed straight ahead,and the ball of your foot on the pedal spindle,check for a straight line from the front of your knee to the pedal spindle.

    This may not fix your problem,but it will at least rule something out,and it won't cost you anything.

    C'dale BBU('05 and '09)/Super Six/Hooligan8and 3,Kona Dew Deluxe,Novara Buzz/Safari,Surly Big Dummy,Marin Pt Reyes,Giant Defy 1,Schwinn DBX SuperSport/Qualifier,Dahon Speed Pro TT,Brompton S6L

  16. #16
    Senior Member Wilfred Laurier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    1,986
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    your saddle does appear pretty level
    so that is probably not the cause
    but you could try tilting it back one notch
    as that is a free and easily reversed change

    the mechanism that a forward tilted saddle causes pressure on the hand
    is that you weight slides forwards
    and your hands have to brace against your weight sliding forward

    it might be slightly counterintuitive
    but this is knowledge i gained through decades
    of selling
    designing
    and building bikes
    and through talking to thousands of cyclists

  17. #17
    Bike hoarder. Murray Missile's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    700 Ft. above sea level.
    My Bikes
    Too many according to my wife.
    Posts
    723
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    "Pop top" riser stem with 3" riser bars. Looks goofy but very comfortable. This frame is small for me but it is my beater/foul weather bike so I wanted plenty of stand over room. It has a long wheel base so I'm not cramped despite the short height.

    Beater (3).jpg Beater (4).jpg Beater (5).jpg
    Analog man in a digital world.

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    44
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thank you all. I've gotten some really great advice from you guys. I think Santa is bringing me a little Christmas cash, so I'll make a decision soon. I plan to report back as well.

  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    771
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    NITTO Technomic for 59$:
    http://harriscyclery.net/sitesearch....SiteSearch.y=0

    But beware. Sometimes raising the bars causes other things on your body to hurt. For instance, I cannot ride with bars above saddle or my back hurts.

    Make sure this stem is the right one for your steerer tube. Harris cyclery could probably tell you over the phone. Your stem should have some dimensions etched into it that you can read when you remove it.

    SAFETY NOTE:
    Also, be sure you don't set this tall stem too low into the butted area of steer tube or else the stem wedge won't have a flat surface to be pressed against when you tighten it. Stem may loosen unexpectedly.

    Scroll down this page to see description and picture of this:
    http://sheldonbrown.com/handsup.html

  20. #20
    Senior Member BobbyG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Colorado Springs, CO
    My Bikes
    1997 Nishiki Blazer, 1984 Nishiki International
    Posts
    429
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Why confine yourself to one hand position. Without changing my bars I added bar-ends, inboard for a jockey-like position and later an aero bar for two-more positions. See my commute video:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=12EyzRuPlZA
    The bar ends were less than 20 bucks!
    "When life hands you lumens, make lumen-aide!"

  21. #21
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    3,134
    Mentioned
    45 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The bar ends were less than 20 bucks!
    trekking figure 8 bend bars are about $20 now too..

  22. #22
    Bike hoarder. Murray Missile's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    700 Ft. above sea level.
    My Bikes
    Too many according to my wife.
    Posts
    723
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
    trekking figure 8 bend bars are about $20 now too..
    I have them on my other 2 bikes and I really like them. Here's one.....

    P1010004.jpgP1010005.jpgP1010006.jpg
    Analog man in a digital world.

  23. #23
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    3,134
    Mentioned
    45 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    A bit different use.. mine are a bit higher than the saddle , and rotated fairly flat .
    a favorite hand rest is open palm laid on the sides ..

    but the bars themselves serve in many user preferences.

  24. #24
    Bike hoarder. Murray Missile's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    700 Ft. above sea level.
    My Bikes
    Too many according to my wife.
    Posts
    723
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
    A bit different use.. mine are a bit higher than the saddle , and rotated fairly flat .
    a favorite hand rest is open palm laid on the sides ..
    So are mine on my other bike but I don't have any good pics of it ditto on the hand position on that bike. The relationship of my cables to the stem won't let me flatten the bars on this bike unless I wanted the cables on top and the front of the bars lower than the rear but for this bike this position actually works well.
    Analog man in a digital world.

  25. #25
    Pedaled too far. Artkansas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    La Petite Roche
    Posts
    12,339
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I had a similar problem with my Hard Rock. The solution was rotating the handlebars a few degrees. It went from painful hands in <20 minutes to never painful. Try it out.
    "He who serves all, best serves himself" Jack London

    Quote Originally Posted by Bjforrestal View Post
    I don't care if you are on a unicycle, as long as you're not using a motor to get places you get props from me. We're here to support each other. Share ideas, and motivate one another to actually keep doing it.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •