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  1. #1
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    Buying New Bike - Any of these Awesome?

    Hi All,

    Sorry if this is the wrong forum area, I couldn't seem to figure out which one was for general recommendations.

    I've been searching for a new bike and haven't the slightest clue what I'm doing. I went through ads and found the ones that are A, the type of bike I'm looking for, and B, my size (I'm 5'9 with 32" in-seam, so ~55cm), then went through and tried to find as many details as a I could. There were a lot of bikes.

    Are any of these a good deal? I'll list the bikes I found, then the little discernible research I could muster up. I'm looking for a commuter with a speed-edge at around $200, but more if it's something worth investing in.

    2010 Raleigh Rusho Hour, $150

    Raleight Sprotif, $130

    Fausto Coppi, $200

    Azuki, $94

    Vintage Motobecane, $150

    Trek Road Bike, $175

    Vintage Windor Carrera, $200

    Ross Grand Prix, $180

    From what little research I've done, the Trek and the Fausto Coppi are the best on the list, is that right? The FC says it needs a little restoration, but it almost seems like it's worth it - people seem to speak pretty highly of them.

    Mucho Apprecianado for advice, gracis mi amigo de bicycles
    Hardcore
    Last edited by ReallyHardcore; 02-18-14 at 10:34 AM. Reason: fixed links

  2. #2
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    RH, The Trek appeals to me the most. First priority is that it is the proper size for you.

    Brad

  3. #3
    Humvee of bikes =Worksman Nightshade's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bradtx View Post
    RH, The Trek appeals to me the most. First priority is that it is the proper size for you.

    Brad
    Ditto +1000
    My preferred bicycle brand is.......WORKSMAN CYCLES
    I dislike clipless pedals on any city bike since I feel they are unsafe.

    Originally Posted by krazygluon
    Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
    Aluminum: barely a hundred, which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?

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    Quote Originally Posted by bradtx View Post
    RH, The Trek appeals to me the most. First priority is that it is the proper size for you.

    Brad
    Brad,

    Thank you for the reply! I will go check the trek out 😊

    If 55cm is my prescribed size, is 56cm acceptable?

    Thanks again,
    Hardcore

  5. #5
    Senior Member Tim_Iowa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReallyHardcore View Post
    If 55cm is my prescribed size, is 56cm acceptable?
    Yes (probably). Each bike manufacturer measures and sizes their bikes differently. The best thing to do is get actual measurements of the frame for the seat tube and top tube. At 5'9", 54-57cm seat tube bikes will be in your size range. But you'll have ride them to find out if they actually fit.

    If the top tube is too long, you can raise the stem or get a shorter reach stem to decrease the reach. Do the opposite to lengthen the reach.

  6. #6
    Senior Member mprelaw's Avatar
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    Just as an FYI, the first Raleigh looks like a single speed. A 46t crank with a 16t rear cog would be fine on the flats, but may not be the greatest for any hills.

    The Trek appeals to me the most, too. It would appeal to me more if the seller included more pictures, and took them closer to show more detail. Take someone who knows a little bit about bikes and what to look for in problem areas.

    Here's what concerns me about the Coppi---the amount of rust on it. I wonder how much corrosion there is internally, in places like the seat tube and bottom bracket. Steel can corrode from the inside, too. It was not well cared for, and may have been left outside in the rain for extended periods. Or in a damp shed.

    Hard to judge the Moto without knowing the model, and I can't determine that from the photos. They made several models, from the entry level Nomade and Mirage, up to the race oriented models like the Grand Record, Le Champion, and Team Champion. There was an intermediate level bike called the Grand Jubilee, too. Personally, I wouldn't pay much more than $75-$100 for a Nomade or Mirage. The fact that it has downtube shifters, rather than stem shifters, doesn't mean a lot. My very first road bike was a Nomade with downtube shifters. But my take on it is entry level.

    The best value there is the Trek, assuming it has nothing major wrong with it.

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    I really likt the Coppi but like he said you got tear it down and restore it,,,,,,work and time.........

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    Quote Originally Posted by mprelaw View Post
    The Trek appeals to me the most, too. It would appeal to me more if the seller included more pictures, and took them closer to show more detail. Take someone who knows a little bit about bikes and what to look for in problem areas.
    Thank you for the very thorough response! Very helpful 😊

    The trek owner isn't far from me, so I've sent an email to meet, just to take a look at the bike. I asked for a little more info like gear set, I will ask for model when I get a chance. Unfortunately I don't know anyon who's very bike savvy... Do you know of any primers I could read on the subject? Books or articles?

    The aluminum frame appeals to me the most on the trek - if it's a good frame I figure I can upgrade when I would like, which makes it a more solid investment. I figure using a bike as a primary means of transportation, it would be worth while to learn about them.

    I can ask for more info on the other bikes... If I had more info, would any of them potentially be as good as the trek?

    Thanks again !!
    Hardcore

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fastfingaz View Post
    I really likt the Coppi but like he said you got tear it down and restore it,,,,,,work and time.........
    I have some of both �� and an aim to learn a little about bikes.

    Initial cost + time & money for restoration, better value then the trek?

    thanks for the helps
    Hardcore

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    I'm really similar in height to you: I'm between 5'9" and 5'10" and my inseam is just over 32" from the sole of my feet to my crotch using the method described in Competitive Cyclist's Fit Calculator.

    With that said, I find most 56 cm road bikes to be a little on the large side. I can straddle them, but not comfortably. Standover clearance isn't the most critical measurement, but if your bike's a ball-buster, there's a good chance it'll be too tall and too long. 54 is generally my sweet spot, give or a take a cm for differences between makes & models. Eyeballing those bikes, most of 'em seem to me like they might be just a little tall, but you won't know for certain until you try 'em in person.

    And while I really like vintage bikes like the Coppi, the Trek strikes me as a better value if it fits and is sound mechanically. The Coppi is likely going to need a lot of work. You may need to buy parts and specialty tools for older sizes and standards, making them potentially scarce and expensive.

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    Senior Member billnuke1's Avatar
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    Trek! I myself would buy 2 or 3 of the others just to add to the stable to work on later! Maybe ride, then sell! The Trek will be your best bike for years! I love my 1100! I've got 1100s, 1200s, and 1400's and all are my favorite go to bikes! Depends on where they reside in the garage! I just got another 1200 with installed aero bars, absolute out control bomb(first ride)!
    Oh! What are you riding now? Maybe MTB?

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    The Trek is a great buy. That Coppi is really low end. Not worth it at 1/2 the price. The Moto is old and low end.

  13. #13
    Senior Member billnuke1's Avatar
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    The Trek will keep you on your toes!

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    Quote Originally Posted by SkyDog75 View Post
    I'm really similar in height to you: I'm between 5'9" and 5'10" and my inseam is just over 32" from the sole of my feet to my crotch using the method described in Competitive Cyclist's Fit Calculator.

    With that said, I find most 56 cm road bikes to be a little on the large side. I can straddle them, but not comfortably. Standover clearance isn't the most critical measurement, but if your bike's a ball-buster, there's a good chance it'll be too tall and too long. 54 is generally my sweet spot, give or a take a cm for differences between makes & models. Eyeballing those bikes, most of 'em seem to me like they might be just a little tall, but you won't know for certain until you try 'em in person.

    And while I really like vintage bikes like the Coppi, the Trek strikes me as a better value if it fits and is sound mechanically. The Coppi is likely going to need a lot of work. You may need to buy parts and specialty tools for older sizes and standards, making them potentially scarce and expensive.
    Very useful information, thank you. I will measure and adjust accordingly. And bring along a measuring tape

    And sound advice on the coppi, I will pass on it.

    Quote Originally Posted by billnuke1 View Post
    Oh! What are you riding now? Maybe MTB?
    Thank you for the enthusiasm! No bike right now, and I'm not sure what MTB means, haha. I'm looking forward to the trek!

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    Everyone has mentioned the importance of size, which makes me curious... How much wiggle room is there? I see the fit calculator above gives pretty specific dimensions. If the bike's off a bit, but still a good value, is it worth it? And how much is a 'bit?' Should I be patient until I find one that's exact?

    Thank you all for the wonderful and plentiful advice. I am very very grateful!

  16. #16
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    There's some wiggle room when it comes to sizing, but in my opinion, not more than a few cm. Get your saddle-to-pedal positioning situated. After that, if you can use a reasonable length stem to put the handlebars in the perfect spot, it's your size. In VERY general terms, subject to much debate, here's a starting point:

    * Adjust the seatpost height such that when you're riding, your leg is very slightly bent when the pedal is at the 6 o'clock position. You want leg extension, but if your knee locks or your hips swivel from side to side as you pedal, the saddle's too high.

    * Position the saddle fore/aft on the seatpost such that your knee is directly over the pedal spindle when the pedal is at its most forward position. This school of thought on saddle positioning is often abbreviated KOPS (Knee Over Pedal Spindle) and while it's not an absolute, it's a decent and simple to understand starting point. You can read more HERE on Sheldon Brown's web site.

    * Once you've got those worked out, lean into a riding position. Don't lock your elbows. Are you comfortable with your hands on the brake hoods? In the drops? Some people believe that ideal handlebar position will be near the point where the handlebar is visually aligned with the front wheel's hub when you're in a riding position. Like KOPS, it's not an absolute, but the norm will be pretty close. You may need to adjust both the height/angle of the stem and its length to get to this point, but it should be obvious if you're close enough that a reasonable replacement stem will put the bars in the ideal position.

    If you can meet those three conditions above, there's a pretty good chance the bike fits. It just so happens that for most of us average-sized people, a bike that fits and is built to typical dimensions will also give you a little clearance when standing flat-footed and straddling the bike. On an older bike with a horizontal top tube, it may be just an inch or so of clearance. Maybe even pretty close to being a little too intimate with your intimates. On more recent bikes, the top tube slopes downward from the front toward the seatpost and you'll have a little more clearance.

    If the bike can't be adjusted to fit properly, it won't be a good value for you no matter how cheap it is. After enough miles, "pretty close" can be pretty uncomfortable.


    And not that it matters a bit, but I just noticed you're in the East Bay... my old neck o' the woods.
    Last edited by SkyDog75; 02-18-14 at 10:54 PM.

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    Senior Member Pibber's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReallyHardcore View Post
    I have some of both �� and an aim to learn a little about bikes.

    Initial cost + time & money for restoration, better value then the trek?

    thanks for the helps
    Hardcore

    only better in value if you think it is. that's a lot of work for that bike. if you have the money, buy that one and the trek. ride the trek, restore the Coppi. the restoration won't be cheap. not exorbitant, but not cheap.

    the trek is the best bike in that group, by a long long shot.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReallyHardcore View Post
    Everyone has mentioned the importance of size, which makes me curious... How much wiggle room is there? I see the fit calculator above gives pretty specific dimensions. If the bike's off a bit, but still a good value, is it worth it? And how much is a 'bit?' Should I be patient until I find one that's exact?

    Thank you all for the wonderful and plentiful advice. I am very very grateful!
    For me I have a 4 cm comfort range WRT a drop bar road bike like the Trek. Proper sizing isn't about clearance when straddling the bicycle while stopped, but rather how the three contact points (butt, hands and feet) inter relate when riding. My crotch contacts the top tube on all of my road bikes at a stop. I just lean the bike a little when stopped with one foot still on a pedal.

    Brad
    Last edited by bradtx; 02-19-14 at 03:47 AM. Reason: sp

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    Quote Originally Posted by ReallyHardcore View Post
    Everyone has mentioned the importance of size, which makes me curious... How much wiggle room is there? I see the fit calculator above gives pretty specific dimensions. If the bike's off a bit, but still a good value, is it worth it? And how much is a 'bit?' Should I be patient until I find one that's exact?

    Thank you all for the wonderful and plentiful advice. I am very very grateful!
    Size is very important and I can illustrate for you. I currently ride a Look 481. It is a lovely bike and it fits me perfectly. When I first got it, I chose a 55 cm frame, built it up and rode it for a couple of years. But it never felt quite right and I couldn't get it set up to be as comfortable as my other road bike, also a Look. I always felt just a bit stretched out. I work part time for a company that imported Look frames. The one I had was a reject that had cosmetic issues, we had several others as well. One day I was looking through the reject bin and I spotted a 54 cm in the same model and colours. So I did a frame swap using all the parts from the 55 cm frame. I couldn't believe the improvement, even though they are the same model, the smaller frame fits so much better. It even seems to handle better and is far more comfortable for any kind of riding. Only 1 cm difference in size. Of course comparing one brand to another, you have to actually take measurements to see how one "size" compares to a different "size" from another bike manufacturer. My son is riding one of these frames as well, his is a 52 cm. His previous bike was a Trek aluminum 54 cm frame. We measured both bikes and his Look Is pretty much identical in all dimensions to the "larger" Trek he used to ride
    Last edited by alcjphil; 02-20-14 at 09:57 AM.

  20. #20
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    I made a impulse buy about 14 years ago , I decided to look and buy a new road bike for a duathlon I was competing in that weekend, anyway I started looking, I have several good lbs's in my area anyway I looked, trying many bikes finally I walked into a lbs got on a bike I liked, right price,,, and then , they didn't have my size!I am 5'5" at 145#s well I needed it and I said I'll take this one they told me thats not the right size for you, but I said I need it for the weekend I'll take it! so they did the best fit they could and I took it ! since then I've ridden dozens of duatholons,centurys, MS tours and hundreds miles just riding,,The bike I bought is a trek 2300 54c,, I have one inch of clearence on the ballbuster! but I've never had a problem!!now after 14 years it hangs on a wall in one of my bedrooms,, still looks good,,,and I thought about looking for the right frame 50c but nagh it's too late I don't even get on it anymore , got 5 other bikes I use now,,,,,,

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    Thanks everyone for the replies again! Unfortunately, after many days of waiting, the Trek Owner contacted me and told me the bike had already been sold. It seems I'm back to square one. Perhaps I'll post another round of them, armed with a little more knowledge I can probably narrow down the list even more.

    Thanks again everyone!

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    Quote Originally Posted by SkyDog75 View Post
    There's some wiggle room when it comes to sizing, but in my opinion, not more than a few cm. Get your saddle-to-pedal positioning situated. After that, if you can use a reasonable length stem to put the handlebars in the perfect spot, it's your size. In VERY general terms, subject to much debate, here's a starting point:

    * Adjust the seatpost height such that when you're riding, your leg is very slightly bent when the pedal is at the 6 o'clock position. You want leg extension, but if your knee locks or your hips swivel from side to side as you pedal, the saddle's too high.

    * Position the saddle fore/aft on the seatpost such that your knee is directly over the pedal spindle when the pedal is at its most forward position. This school of thought on saddle positioning is often abbreviated KOPS (Knee Over Pedal Spindle) and while it's not an absolute, it's a decent and simple to understand starting point. You can read more HERE on Sheldon Brown's web site.

    * Once you've got those worked out, lean into a riding position. Don't lock your elbows. Are you comfortable with your hands on the brake hoods? In the drops? Some people believe that ideal handlebar position will be near the point where the handlebar is visually aligned with the front wheel's hub when you're in a riding position. Like KOPS, it's not an absolute, but the norm will be pretty close. You may need to adjust both the height/angle of the stem and its length to get to this point, but it should be obvious if you're close enough that a reasonable replacement stem will put the bars in the ideal position.

    If you can meet those three conditions above, there's a pretty good chance the bike fits. It just so happens that for most of us average-sized people, a bike that fits and is built to typical dimensions will also give you a little clearance when standing flat-footed and straddling the bike. On an older bike with a horizontal top tube, it may be just an inch or so of clearance. Maybe even pretty close to being a little too intimate with your intimates. On more recent bikes, the top tube slopes downward from the front toward the seatpost and you'll have a little more clearance.

    If the bike can't be adjusted to fit properly, it won't be a good value for you no matter how cheap it is. After enough miles, "pretty close" can be pretty uncomfortable.


    And not that it matters a bit, but I just noticed you're in the East Bay... my old neck o' the woods.
    Very ​helpful! Thank you!

  23. #23
    Home School Valedictorian 02Giant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReallyHardcore View Post
    Thanks everyone for the replies again! Unfortunately, after many days of waiting, the Trek Owner contacted me and told me the bike had already been sold. It seems I'm back to square one. Perhaps I'll post another round of them, armed with a little more knowledge I can probably narrow down the list even more.

    Thanks again everyone!
    In my area you have to be ready to act fast, good bikes at good prices go fast. I have had a few that were sold out from under me (assumption the new owner offered more sight unseen to get them).
    We've got no fear, no doubt, all in balls out

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    Quote Originally Posted by 02Giant View Post
    In my area you have to be ready to act fast, good bikes at good prices go fast. I have had a few that were sold out from under me (assumption the new owner offered more sight unseen to get them).
    I'm starting to see. Especially in the bay area, where mass transit is readily available.

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    If I can ask another broad question... how do I go about appraising a bike? I'm sure there are millions of details, but how do I start learning? I know if I'm patient enough, I can get a really good deal if I keep looking, but I have to know enough to be quick enough, haha.

    Do you have any personal advice on appraising a bike? Books that taught you what you know or articles I could read? Websites you frequent that have great information about models or brands? If I spend a few hours reading, hopefully I'll be confident enough to jump into a buy, is my thinking.

    Multitudes of gratitude. This forum is really something else, I've never met so many helpful people. Thank you all.
    Last edited by ReallyHardcore; 02-21-14 at 02:44 PM. Reason: sp

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