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  1. #1
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    Is this a proper locking method?

    I live in Chicago, and want to make sure it's secure. I've heard of people using the "Sheldon Brown" method instead, and locking the back wheel, but it still seems like the wheel could be cut off. Also I know people suggest locking the back wheel with the u lock instead of the cable since it's more valuable, but on a fixie with no gears, is it really any more valuable?

    This is usually the method I use. Is this proper?

    If not, and I should use the sheldon brown method? Should I lock part of the frame as well as the wheel? I see a lot of people just locking the wheel.
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    Last edited by romnation; 03-20-14 at 07:13 PM. Reason: fixed picture

  2. #2
    Senior Member Dave Cutter's Avatar
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  3. #3
    Senior Member john4789's Avatar
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    Looks fine. I personally use the U-Lock on the back wheel plus frame as it is a little more valuable (hub more expensive plus cog and lockring). Also, you might want to consider using a locking cable lock which has its own locking mechanism instead of the plain cable. That way they need to cut your U-lock and your locking cable to get your whole bike. Your situation as of now is cut the U-lock and get the whole thing. Not that it makes it much safer, but feels right and is a little extra deterrent for the same weight.

    Just as important is where you lock it. High traffic, well lit areas will keep your bike safer. Watch out for sucker poles.

    One last thing, I often use two U-locks if I need to lock up in a high-risk situation (bad part of town or over night on the street).

  4. #4
    imi
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    Is this a proper locking method?

    That's a pretty looking bike.
    How long are you leaving it? Just while in a shop, or longer. Hopefully not overnight?
    Parts theft is unfortunately all too common

  5. #5
    imi
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    Quote Originally Posted by john4789 View Post
    One last thing, I often use two U-locks if I need to lock up in a high-risk situation (bad part of town or over night on the street).
    I would never leave my bike if I thought it was a high risk area, or overnight on the street. Just sayin'...

  6. #6
    apocryphal sobriquet J.C. Koto's Avatar
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    It looks fine, however, I'd be sure the rack itself can't be disassembled where the bolt in the top rail meets the bar on the end where you have your lock.

  7. #7
    The Improbable Bulk Little Darwin's Avatar
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    Looks secure enough to me. You can almost always do more, so security is really about making it "secure enough" for your comfort level.
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  8. #8
    Bicycle Repair Man !!! Sixty Fiver's Avatar
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    I would reverse the locks and use the shackle to secure the frame and / or wheel to the rack with the cable securing the front wheel which is less expensive than the rear.

    Locking the frame and rear wheel serves as a better visual deterrent but the SB method of locking the rear wheel separate from the frame makes stealing either nearly impossible.

    I like my mini shackle and cable although the cable can be used with the u-lock as well... the mini can disable the bicycle so that even if the other locks were bypassed you would still have to carry it away.


  9. #9
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    cable quick to cut then your rear wheel may be gone , but they would need both a bolt cutter and a wrench .


    Hardened , heavy security chain would be better than a cable. at least in Chicago / NYC

  10. #10
    Senior Member overbyte's Avatar
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    I bought one of those "New York" chains. It is heavvvvyyyy. It would definitely slow down someone trying to cut the chain and grab the bike. But given enough time and in an obscure location, I'm sure I could cut through it with a portable battery-powered circular saw fitted with a metal cutting blade. I once cut through a 1/2" diameter stainless steel bar that way in about 3 minutes, not for any nefarious purpose, just to shorten it to fit something. The same could be done to U-locks, cables, and whatever else we can think of to secure the bike. The best advice I have is to park the bike in a public location in good light so a thief may think about being seen, and lock every part you can to something strong and stationary. Go through both wheels and the frame triangle and around the secure object. And if you have an expensive saddle, like a Brooks, I'd open the seat tube clamp and take the seat with you off of the bike.

    I bought a locking device that has a thin cable only, but at both ends it locks into a box mounted on the seat tube. The mounting U-bolt nuts are concealed inside of the box, so nothing can be removed without cutting the cable or opening the box. Doing either of those things causes a loud alarm to blast, similar to a smoke detector. A warning tag on the cable advises the would-be thief that cutting the cable will sound an alarm. I'd also add tag that says cutting the cable will activate a tracking device hidden inside the bike. Perhaps if the thief looks at that setup, he might go to the next bike instead of risking the theft of yours. I don't know how effective this system would actually be. A thief may just cut the cable, grab, and run off with the alarm sounding, but then again, he may drop the bike and run.
    Last edited by overbyte; 03-21-14 at 09:53 AM.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    Keep in mind that the "Sheldon Brown Method" predates modern battery powered portable cutting tools. Now one tool can defeat all kinds of locks.

    Bicycle security is a game of one-up-man-ship with the thief which you will always eventually lose. If I had to leave my bike in an iffy neighborhood, I'd use a semi-expendable bike and I'd try to park it close to a nicer bike.
    My greatest fear is all of my kids standing around my coffin and talking about "how sensible" dad was.

  12. #12
    Bicycle Repair Man !!! Sixty Fiver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Retro Grouch View Post
    Keep in mind that the "Sheldon Brown Method" predates modern battery powered portable cutting tools. Now one tool can defeat all kinds of locks.

    Bicycle security is a game of one-up-man-ship with the thief which you will always eventually lose. If I had to leave my bike in an iffy neighborhood, I'd use a semi-expendable bike and I'd try to park it close to a nicer bike.
    If someone is carrying a cutoff wheel it won't matter how well your bike is locked.

    Parking next to nicer bikes with crappy locks may be the best strategy of them all.


  13. #13
    Senior Member john4789's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by imi View Post
    I would never leave my bike if I thought it was a high risk area, or overnight on the street. Just sayin'...
    One point to add, my 'locking on the street bike' is a used beater bike that i payed almost nothing for. It is also my rain/winter commuter. If that bike were stolen using two U-locks, the capitol loss of the locks would be on par with the bike. I ride that bike if I expect to be in the noted situations, which isn't very often but does occur from time to time.

  14. #14
    Humvee of bikes =Worksman Nightshade's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Retro Grouch View Post
    Keep in mind that the "Sheldon Brown Method" predates modern battery powered portable cutting tools. Now one tool can defeat all kinds of locks.
    The one and only way to secure a bike today is good insurance on it.
    My preferred bicycle brand is.......WORKSMAN CYCLES
    I dislike clipless pedals on any city bike since I feel they are unsafe.

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