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Old 04-26-14, 05:04 AM   #1
pizza777
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126mm rear wheel in 120 spacing

Hi, I have a single speed bike and I want to convert my wheels to quick releases for ease of repair. The problem is my rear spacing is 120mm and I can only seem to find 126mm rear wheels that are quick release. I've heard it's easy to change the spacing from 126 to 120 by changing the bolts or cutting off some length? Could I also just squeeze the 126mm wheel into the gap and just stretch the metal a bit. Also I'm worried about putting a quick release wheel in a horizontal spacing. Is it the quick release strong enough to keep the wheel in place in a horizontal fork?

I'm thinking of order this wheel on ebay? What do you guys/gals think?

Bike Rear Wheel 700 x 23 28c 126mm Hub 6 7 SPD New | eBay

Last edited by pizza777; 04-26-14 at 05:26 AM.
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Old 04-26-14, 05:24 AM   #2
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Lots of questions and I'm not quite sure by what you mean by some of them.

You can spread the frame to 126 mm assuming we are talking about a steel frame: Bicycle Frame/Hub Spacing

You can simply push apart the drop outs to mount the wheel; it will be a little tougher getting the wheel in and out though.

Not so easy to change the dimension of the wheel from 126 mm to 120. You can put in the correct length axle and spacers but you will also need to redish the wheel since the extra length will come out of the freewheel side. I doubt there is much that can come out of the non-drive side in terms of spacers and the like.

A quick release can hold the wheel in your dropout; that is what it is designed to do (this has nothing to do btw with whether you are running a clincher tire or not). Do you know how to properly use a quick release? If not, google around and watch a youtube video.
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Old 04-26-14, 05:26 AM   #3
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Woops, I meant is the quick release skewer strong enough to hold the wheel in place. Would you suggest getting that wheel on ebay? I'm pretty sure my bike is steel. And 6mm stretch doesn't seem like that much so I was thinking of just squeezing it in there.

Last edited by pizza777; 04-26-14 at 05:32 AM.
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Old 04-26-14, 05:34 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pizza777 View Post
(1) Woops, I meant is the quick release strong enough to hold the wheel in place. (2) Would you suggest getting that wheel on ebay? (3) I'm pretty sure my bike is steel. And 6mm stretch doesn't seem like that much so I was thinking of just squeezing it in there.
(1) Yes.
(2) Probably not. See what you can get from a bike shop. It will be good to have a mechanic look it over and make sure it is right first. You can get inexpensive wheels from lots of different sources; there are mail order bike stores that also have inexpensive wheels. Cheap wheels are a pain to buy mail order because of shipping. Plus what do you do if the wheel is bad? Talk to your bike shop and check out craigslist as well.
(3) If it's not steel, don't spread it.
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Old 04-26-14, 05:36 AM   #5
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Thanks for the info! I'll stop by my local shop today and see what they say.
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Old 04-26-14, 08:42 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pizza777 View Post
Woops, I meant is the quick release skewer strong enough to hold the wheel in place. Would you suggest getting that wheel on ebay? I'm pretty sure my bike is steel. And 6mm stretch doesn't seem like that much so I was thinking of just squeezing it in there.
QR skewers work for everyone else, no reason they won't work for you

You may be able to replace the axle to a hollow one, but could be more trouble than it's worth to find compatible parts.

Yes, you can just squeeze it in there. The "correct" way is to CAREFULLY bend the STEEL frame open so that it becomes a 126mm frame, but not required.
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Old 04-26-14, 09:43 AM   #7
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126 as shown that would be for a 6~7 speed freewheel . you have a single speed ?, a lot of extra work is required .

de dishing and altering the axle spacing combination.

The Internal cam QR ala Campag and Shimano's has more clamping power , vs the external cam types..

popular with derailleur bikes,, being vertical dropouts these-days ..

and you just change the axle and are not needing to change the whole wheel ..

if the locknuts on the outside end of the axle assembly is toothy that helps too ,,



No. I dont suggest getting a wheel on Ebay .. particularly if you really dont know what you need as the OP suggests .

they will just ask payment , no suggestion of not needing to buy it in the first place.

a bike shop is a 2 way conversation

Last edited by fietsbob; 04-26-14 at 09:51 AM.
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Old 04-26-14, 04:13 PM   #8
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The frame material makes a difference too. Steel can be cold set (using a 2x4 to spread the frame), but I wouldn't do it with aluminum. Not sure about titanium.
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Old 04-26-14, 04:49 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pizza777 View Post
Woops, I meant is the quick release skewer strong enough to hold the wheel in place.
No,not if you have track ends. Unless you're running a conversion with vertical dropouts and a tensioner,you need nuts to get the proper amount of torque. Also,this question would be better asked over in the SS/FG forum.
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Old 04-26-14, 05:26 PM   #10
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yes a QR (the oldschool internal cam design) is strong enough to hold a rear single speed or fixed wheel in place on track ends and horizontal or vertical road drop outs. it has for decades.

my only guess is that people that state otherwise have little experience with single speed bicycles in general. i wonder if they think that all the derailleur equipped road bicycles that had horizontal rear dropouts before the 90's, and were ridden by professionals were pulling their rear wheels out of the dropouts.

i will say that some of the more recent skewers have a lot to be desired though, in as much as they are designed to deal with vertical dropouts that don't demand as much from them.

Last edited by hueyhoolihan; 04-26-14 at 05:32 PM.
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Old 04-27-14, 12:58 PM   #11
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Your bike frame is steel right?

Steel is the only material that can be cold set. If in doubt get a magnet and test it.



I just did a cold set on my frame the other day. I used a wooden shovel handle to do it.
In my limited experience I learned a few things that may help you;

Go slowly and use gentle tugs
count the number of tugs and repeat exactly the same amount on the other side
remember that you will misalign the dropouts in the process, Sheldon Brown recommends having a bike shop do the alignment because expensive tools are required. If you don't align you'll end up with a bent axle.

I also did basic alignment as per Sheldon Brown by tying a string from dropout to headtube to opposite dropout. I got the chainstays in alignment and dropouts roughly equal. When I get the frame back from the powder coater I'll have a bike shop align it fully.

It isn't a difficult operation or anything. Take your time and no problem.

-P
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Old 04-27-14, 05:48 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hueyhoolihan View Post
my only guess is that people that state otherwise have little experience with single speed bicycles in general.
Tried to use a QR on my old 1x1,didn't make it through the test ride. Wound up using a locking skewer and chain tug.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hueyhoolihan View Post
i wonder if they think that all the derailleur equipped road bicycles that had horizontal rear dropouts before the 90's, and were ridden by professionals were pulling their rear wheels out of the dropouts.
If memory serves,those weren't horizontal track ends,they were angled semi's.

Quote:
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i will say that some of the more recent skewers have a lot to be desired though, in as much as they are designed to deal with vertical dropouts that don't demand as much from them.
Exactly. Most modern QR's aren't up to the task.
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Old 05-03-14, 01:04 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by pumabicycle View Post
Your bike frame is steel right?

Steel is the only material that can be cold set. If in doubt get a magnet and test it.



I just did a cold set on my frame the other day. I used a wooden shovel handle to do it.
In my limited experience I learned a few things that may help you;

Go slowly and use gentle tugs
count the number of tugs and repeat exactly the same amount on the other side
remember that you will misalign the dropouts in the process, Sheldon Brown recommends having a bike shop do the alignment because expensive tools are required. If you don't align you'll end up with a bent axle.

I also did basic alignment as per Sheldon Brown by tying a string from dropout to headtube to opposite dropout. I got the chainstays in alignment and dropouts roughly equal. When I get the frame back from the powder coater I'll have a bike shop align it fully.

It isn't a difficult operation or anything. Take your time and no problem.

-P
Do you guys know how much this would cost approximately. Also, I picked up a 15mm ratchet and has made removing the bolts a breeze. Is one enough or would it be an improvement to tighten both sides at the same time with two ratchets?
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Old 05-03-14, 01:58 PM   #14
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cost in what? CHF, Euros, SEK? $ Pesos ?

5 speed is still 120, it would be a freewheel combination, the wheel you linked to is of that type
some axle shortening and re dishing the spokes , more labor than parts. adapt the wheel to the frame.

other than buying the wheel and freewheel.

you could get a internal gear hub 5 speed too.

low maintenance simple to operate.

Last edited by fietsbob; 05-03-14 at 02:06 PM.
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Old 05-04-14, 01:01 AM   #15
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cost in what? CHF, Euros, SEK? $ Pesos ?

5 speed is still 120, it would be a freewheel combination, the wheel you linked to is of that type
some axle shortening and re dishing the spokes , more labor than parts. adapt the wheel to the frame.

other than buying the wheel and freewheel.

you could get a internal gear hub 5 speed too.

low maintenance simple to operate.
USD. I really don't like my wheel set and I'm looking for a nicer set that's fairly affordable, lightweight, and can be used with 23mm tires.

Would like to know how much it would cost for a bike shop to properly cold set my rear spacing to 126mm. Or is 120mm the standard for fixed gear bikes now and should I not bother?
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Old 05-04-14, 07:09 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by pizza777 View Post
USD. I really don't like my wheel set and I'm looking for a nicer set that's fairly affordable, lightweight, and can be used with 23mm tires.

Would like to know how much it would cost for a bike shop to properly cold set my rear spacing to 126mm. Or is 120mm the standard for fixed gear bikes now and should I not bother?
Just call and ask. Then you will have a "real" answer instead of random guesses from the internet.
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Old 05-04-14, 09:17 AM   #17
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Track hubs in classical era, were 110 and , 120.. its already a fixie frame no derailleur hanger ?
you that Cost Conscious? I'd just leave it as is and run a 5 speed freewheel ..

and use a hanger that the axle nut holds on.



and .. + 1 you ask the person doing the work for a price , not Us,
No virtual pry-bar, we would not be doing the work .
though may suggest somewhere to ship the frame to a known shop that they may have used before.


if you have more than one option,?

treat it like the county with your tax money on a road project.* , and take Bids from each.

* (ignoring the good-old-boy factor, of favorite contractors)

Last edited by fietsbob; 05-04-14 at 09:25 AM.
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Old 05-04-14, 10:16 AM   #18
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If you don't want or need the additional space 126mm OLD provides, just saw off the excess length on the axle. You will need to remove some spacers and possibly re-dish the wheel.

Last edited by JohnDThompson; 05-04-14 at 10:19 AM.
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