Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 07-30-14, 10:41 AM   #26
Willbird
Senior Member
 
Willbird's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Very N and Very W Ohio Williams Co.
Bikes: 2001 Trek Multitrack 7200, 2104 Fuji Sportif 1.5
Posts: 2,442
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
Pretty crazy, I have ridden 800+ miles in the last 60 days, and have not been involved in a cycle/cycle pass of any kind :-).

The one girl that I see now and then who rides on the wrong side of the road always switches sides about 1/2 mile before I would pass her on the same side going different directions.

Bill
Willbird is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-14, 10:44 AM   #27
CharlyAlfaRomeo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 619
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scooter123 View Post
I hear this claimed from time to time, but in my experience it's bogus. We have large group rides that attract bicyclists of all levels of experience in central NC every year. I pass dozens of cyclists this way, and all but the youngest children do the right thing. If you're frequently seeing people veer into your path when you alert them, try doing it a little sooner and allowing them more space.

If we treat strangers on bicycles as potential obstacles instead of potential friends, it's rude behavior. It sends the wrong signal to new riders. We're better than that.
That's nice that in your experience in GROUP RIDES everybody plays nice but on public paths and roads my experience is different.

FYI in a group ride setting "hold your line" is a perfectly acceptable and common practice. Usually told to people who can't ride in a predictable manner.

In a group setting you don't normally tell people anything when you come by because its expected that everyone will ride predictably and yes, in a GROUP RIDE you are expected to go over most obstacles in your path so that you don't cause carnage behind you due to your lack of bike handling skills.

As far as riding solo in a public setting thanks for the advice but I do ring a bell many times from a long way back when approaching people and its always the ones that can't hear all that get startled when you get closer and do all kinds of silly crap that endangers other users. I continue to ring my bell and warn people from quite a distance but stopped saying "on your left" a long time ago. My rides are much safer for it.

Last edited by CharlyAlfaRomeo; 07-30-14 at 12:07 PM.
CharlyAlfaRomeo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-14, 10:53 AM   #28
dicktill
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Allegany NY (rural, hilly, Western NY state)
Bikes: 1973 Schwinn World Voyageur (orange & lugged!), 2000 Airborne Zeppelin (27-speed Ultegra), 1999 Specialized Crossroads (hybrid), 2011 Montague Navigator (full-sized folding)
Posts: 178
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I can only speak for myself: I ride roads only, and solo only; I appreciate some sort of warning (bell, "hey", "on your left", "good afternoon", etc.) when a faster rider (i.e., most anyone) comes up to pass me.

Thanks in advance, Dick
dicktill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-14, 10:59 AM   #29
Booger1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Gaseous Cloud around Uranus
Bikes:
Posts: 3,719
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 21 Post(s)
In SoCal, yelling "on your left" gets mixed reactions.....Somebody that rides will understand....The other 95% anything could happen....and that's if they heard you over the sound the earbuds are making in the first place.

Just because your out in public doesn't mean you have to pay attention to your surroundings....In fact,quite the opposite seams to be true....That's the time to escape reality....

Last edited by Booger1; 07-30-14 at 11:09 AM.
Booger1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-14, 11:25 AM   #30
jputnam
Senior Member
 
jputnam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Pacific, WA
Bikes: Custom 531ST touring, Bilenky Viewpoint, Bianchi Milano, vintage Condor racer
Posts: 1,261
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
If the rider you're passing happens to be an experienced cyclist familiar with the culture of group rides in English-speaking, drive-on-the-right countries, "on your left" can be very effective.

If the rider you're passing is just someone on a bike, they're not in the middle of a conversation with you and probably won't catch the first word or two out of your mouth anyway. You say "left," they veer left like you asked them to. You say "line," they look for a line somewhere. Assuming they heard you and speak English, of course.

Assuming you're on an open street, not a closed course, they're also free to ignore you. As the overtaking vehicle, it's your job to provide safe passing clearance, including leaving reasonable room for the overtaken vehicle to avoid road obstacles.
jputnam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-14, 12:09 PM   #31
coykiam
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: New York, NY
Bikes:
Posts: 20
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I usually just say "excuse me" especially if its a couple of trail walkers. If it's a rider then I say "on your left." I seem to get better reaction doing it this way.
coykiam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-14, 12:16 PM   #32
RPK79
Senior Member
 
RPK79's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: SE MN
Bikes: Fuji Roubaix Pro & Fuji Track Classic
Posts: 8,066
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 383 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by dicktill View Post

Thanks in advance, Dick
No need for name calling.
RPK79 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-14, 12:50 PM   #33
Rider_1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Bikes:
Posts: 207
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Use a bell! For one reason, your voice can't be heard as far away as you need to start warning people that you are approaching. I'll start the process about 40 +feet away, depending on the situation, and continue to ring at meaningful intervals as I get closer. I am regularly thanked by others for such courteous behaviour. I my bell work is an art!

Last edited by Rider_1; 07-30-14 at 12:54 PM.
Rider_1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-14, 12:59 PM   #34
look566 rider
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Central Ohio
Bikes: Bianchi Infinito w/Chorus 2011 Look 566 (deceased May 28, 2016), '04 Cannondale Optimo 800, '87 d'Arienzo-Basso w/full Campy & '51 Rudge Sports, '72 Raliegh Superbe and '62 Raliegh Gran Sport (currently under restoration).
Posts: 549
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
I pretty much use "Bike back" almost with everyone. I have a loud voice, so I call out early enough to get there attention so they can get there act together.

I use this because I have had every situation mentioned in this thread happen to me, women gabbing, path users without a clue, families with wild kids. Calling out "Bike back" almost always gets them to acknowledge there is someone else on the path besides them.

And don't forget about the ear bud zombies that wouldn't hear you at all!
look566 rider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-14, 01:10 PM   #35
t x
Senior Member
 
t x's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Alameda, CA
Bikes: Windsor The Hour Plus, 2014 Novara Verita, Windsor Oxford
Posts: 205
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlyAlfaRomeo View Post
I stopped saying "on your left" or "passing left" when I realized that this caused about 80% of people to swerve to the left in front of me.
I've been experimenting recently and have noticed that those people tend to react better if I use complete sentences. When I say "on your left" they tend to move left, but when I say " Careful! I'm coming up on your left side" they tend to hold their line. I don't have an explanation for this but I think they might only hear "left" in the shorter phrase and so move in that direction, whereas the longer phrase gives them time to actually pay attention to what I'm saying. YMMV
t x is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-14, 01:54 PM   #36
gl98115
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Bikes:
Posts: 323
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by modelmartin View Post
"Hold your line" on the road sounds like boy racer talk.
Correct. On the track it would be "Stick" or "Stay".
gl98115 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-14, 02:38 PM   #37
hueyhoolihan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Above ground, Walnut Creek, Ca
Bikes: 7⃥ 9 road bikes
Posts: 6,401
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
what's the socially acceptable protocol for passing this decidedly strange bunch?



i *like* door number three.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 57633.jpg (37.5 KB, 14 views)
File Type: jpg strange_tandem_sm.jpg (16.5 KB, 11 views)
File Type: jpg 03.jpg (28.3 KB, 10 views)
hueyhoolihan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-14, 02:43 PM   #38
ThermionicScott 
Gratuitous glib and snark
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: CID
Bikes: 1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX, 1980s Raleigh mixte (hers)
Posts: 13,397
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 131 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by RPK79 View Post
No need for name calling.
Womp-womp...
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
RUSA #7498
ThermionicScott is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-14, 02:46 PM   #39
linnefaulk
Senior Member
 
linnefaulk's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: florida
Bikes: 1990 Trek 820, 1995 Trek 1220
Posts: 1,805
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I had a Fred pass me today. He never made a sound and didn't return my greeting. I saw him in my mirror so I knew he was coming up behind me. He had headphones in (illegal in Florida.)
linnefaulk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-14, 03:02 PM   #40
CharlyAlfaRomeo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 619
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by linnefaulk View Post
I had a Fred pass me today. He never made a sound and didn't return my greeting. I saw him in my mirror so I knew he was coming up behind me. He had headphones in (illegal in Florida.)
Passed by a Fred?

For shame, for shame.
CharlyAlfaRomeo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-14, 04:57 PM   #41
gl98115
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Bikes:
Posts: 323
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by t x View Post
I've been experimenting recently and have noticed that those people tend to react better if I use complete sentences. When I say "on your left" they tend to move left, but when I say " Careful! I'm coming up on your left side" they tend to hold their line.
What if you said "Hold your line"?
gl98115 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-14, 05:08 PM   #42
linnefaulk
Senior Member
 
linnefaulk's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: florida
Bikes: 1990 Trek 820, 1995 Trek 1220
Posts: 1,805
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlyAlfaRomeo View Post
Passed by a Fred?

For shame, for shame.
No shame here. He was riding a road bike, I was riding my 24 year old mountain bike.
linnefaulk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-14, 05:12 PM   #43
CharlyAlfaRomeo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 619
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by linnefaulk View Post
No shame here. He was riding a road bike, I was riding my 24 year old mountain bike.
I'm just being cheeky, everyone gets passed.
CharlyAlfaRomeo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-14, 05:25 PM   #44
linnefaulk
Senior Member
 
linnefaulk's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: florida
Bikes: 1990 Trek 820, 1995 Trek 1220
Posts: 1,805
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlyAlfaRomeo View Post
I'm just being cheeky, everyone gets passed.
No worries. The forums seemed to be filled with more than a touch of sarcasm. Which is just how I like it.
linnefaulk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-14, 05:38 PM   #45
CharlyAlfaRomeo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 619
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by linnefaulk View Post
No worries. The forums seemed to be filled with more than a touch of sarcasm. Which is just how I like it.
What I meant to say was everyone gets passed, except me.
CharlyAlfaRomeo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-14, 06:52 PM   #46
linnefaulk
Senior Member
 
linnefaulk's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: florida
Bikes: 1990 Trek 820, 1995 Trek 1220
Posts: 1,805
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlyAlfaRomeo View Post
What I meant to say was everyone gets passed, except me.
Probably because you are all over the road like a drunk.
linnefaulk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-14, 08:30 PM   #47
CharlyAlfaRomeo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 619
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I prefer to call it blocking.
CharlyAlfaRomeo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-14, 08:53 PM   #48
Hauptmann6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Kalamazoo
Bikes: Giant Escape 2
Posts: 70
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Yup, a 20 year old girl just about took out me, a friend of mine and his son by swerving out of her group in front of us. They were just going fast enough to stay up. And she didn't understand why we were all yelling at her.
Hauptmann6 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-14, 08:55 PM   #49
Hauptmann6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Kalamazoo
Bikes: Giant Escape 2
Posts: 70
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scooter123 View Post
I hear this claimed from time to time, but in my experience it's bogus. We have large group rides that attract bicyclists of all levels of experience in central NC every year. I pass dozens of cyclists this way, and all but the youngest children do the right thing. If you're frequently seeing people veer into your path when you alert them, try doing it a little sooner and allowing them more space.

If we treat strangers on bicycles as potential obstacles instead of potential friends, it's rude behavior. It sends the wrong signal to new riders. We're better than that.
Group rides are VERY different than random rides on a MUP.
Hauptmann6 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-14, 01:39 PM   #50
DaveZ
DeadheadDave
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Sacramento
Bikes: 1 Trek road bike, 1 Nishiki road bike (old), 1 Cannondale
Posts: 64
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
you beat me to it!
DaveZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:21 PM.