Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > > >

Great Lakes Illinois | Indiana | Iowa | Michigan | Minnesota | Ohio | Wisconsin

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 06-04-11, 09:29 PM   #1
cbreeden
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Madison, Wisconsin
Bikes: None! :(
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Commuting in Madison Wi

Hello,

I am looking to start biking to and from school (about a 5 mile commute). I live in Madison Wisconsin and I am not very knowledgable of all my options, and what would be my best choice for a bike. I am willing to spend up to $700 or so.

Because of the 4 seasons, I was thinking that a hybrid would be best for me. I am pretty sure that I will be doing most of my riding in designated bike paths and side streets. So far I have looked at a Trek FX 7.5 (we found some new 2010 models for about $700) and a Giant Roam 2 which was going for about $500. At first I was leaning toward the Trek FX 7.5, but I started to get worried about how the Trek would hold up compared to the Giant during the winter with the snow on the ground. My basic understanding is that the Giant's wider wheels may be better suited for Madison winters.

I really am at a lost when it comes to considering other models, and what other factors I should be considering. Any advice would be very much appreciated! Thank you!
cbreeden is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-11, 09:34 PM   #2
10 Wheels
Galveston County Texas
 
10 Wheels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: In The Wind
Bikes: 2010 Expedition, 03 GTO
Posts: 29,894
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 301 Post(s)
http://www.bikeforums.net/forumdispl...Winter-Cycling
__________________
[SIZE=1][B]What I like about Texas[/B]
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PGukLuXzH1E

Set F1re To The Ra1n ( NY Night Rain Ride)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7jfcWEkSrI
10 Wheels is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-11, 02:01 PM   #3
IceNine
El Duderino
 
IceNine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Madison, WI
Bikes: 84 Raleigh Portage, 83 Trek 620
Posts: 481
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Winter biking is fairly hard on a bike because the salt on the roads gets all over your frame and drivetrain. Therefore I prefer a dedicated beater bike for winter with studded tires. An internal gear hub or fixie is also not a bad option to consider for winter. (Another option is a different wheel set for summer and winter that you can quickly swap depending on conditions.)

$700 isn't going to go far if you are buying new, due to all the add-on bits that you need for commuting. The best option would probably be to get a vintage mountain bike with no suspension and purchase two new sets of tires, a Hakka W106 studded tire set for winter and a smooth puncture-proof tire set for summer. Attach fenders and some sort of rack, get a good flashlight and twofish flashlight holder, a Superflash blinky, and you are good to go. If you are handy, you can make your own set of panniers. I made a pair out of ginger buckets. It gets dark here by 4:30 in winter, so good lights are imperative for winter commuting.

The tires are an often under-looked piece of the equation--don't scrimp there. You can start off with the conventional mountain bike drivetrain, but consider upgrading to an internal gear hub if you plan to use the bike in winter.

I'm guessing on prices but here's what I'd budget if starting from scratch:

Craigslist Mountain bike $120
Hakka studded tires $160
Summer tires $100
Rack $50
Fenders $40
Superflash $25
Twofish $15

I guaranty that with awesome smooth summer tires plus awesome studded tires, an old mountain bike would blow away any 2010 models you are looking at in your price range.

Last edited by IceNine; 06-05-11 at 02:08 PM.
IceNine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-11, 07:17 PM   #4
CPcyclist
Senior Member
 
CPcyclist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Wisconsin
Bikes: Lemond Arrivee, Felt F1 Road, Tomac Revolver(full), GT race (hardtail)
Posts: 1,646
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
IceNine is right an old mountain bike with the proper tires will take you farther. Plus since you will be locking it up it will look like a less desirable taget for theft or vandalism.
CPcyclist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-11, 08:20 PM   #5
dedhed
SE Wis
 
dedhed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Bikes: '68 Raleigh Sprite, '02 Raleigh C500, '84 Raleigh Gran Prix, '91 Trek 400
Posts: 3,024
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 27 Post(s)
You can bump some of those prices on accessories by shopping sales too. For example REI recently had 25% off all planet bike. I picked up the superflash for $18, rack for $25, and the fenders would have been about $30. I bought my panniers at a REI scratch & dent sale for $35, and my previous pair used for $20. I always figure $100 to do the basic set up for commuting accessories. pump, tool/spare tire bag, rack, minimal lighting.

+1 on the used Mt. bike. Plenty of older lightly used Trek 700 and 800 series bombproof steel Mt/hybrids out there. Not to mention Gary Fishers and Giants. You might find a better deal on the Milwaukee Craigslist though.
dedhed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-11, 09:09 PM   #6
Henry III 
is just a real cool dude
 
Henry III's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: The Thumb, MI
Bikes:
Posts: 3,092
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Go check out Dream Bikes and you could build or buy something up quite nice. I picked up my Bianchi Nyala MTB for $100 earlier this year. All tuned up and ready to go and wasn't beat to hell. Go check them out before shelling out some crazy money. They'd got a pretty decent selection of bikes...mtb,road, hybrid, older stuff all extremely reasonable and ready to ride. I built that up into my winter commuter and worked great. I actually still have and pulled off my studded tires, fenders and rear rack as I'm not commuting anymore(laid off). Even with riding it from the end of January till the last snowfall it still works great even with the salt and snow. I'd say check them out before finding some mystery bike on CL. Atleast they've been gone through and you know they work and if something goes wrong you can bring it back. Plus it's just a really cool place since it's nicely run Co-op as it's backed from Trek so their parts bins have alot of Bontrager parts to say the least. You able to go in and actually work on your own bike with their tools which I wish someplace around here had.
Henry III is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-12, 06:24 PM   #7
vanwormer
Junior Member
 
vanwormer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Bikes:
Posts: 15
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Ahhhhh. . . . Madison: Beautiful!
vanwormer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-12, 08:37 AM   #8
jimbojonez
Senior Member
 
jimbojonez's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Bikes: 2011 Trek 7.5 FX
Posts: 74
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I ride year around in Madison and i have 2 bikes

-Marin 29er Hardtail mountain bike for the winter and mountain biking during the summer. Complete with disc brakes, spiked tires and fenders.

-Trek 7.5 FX, this is my main bike for trail and occasional road riding depending on weather.

I highly recommend a separate bike for the winter. IMO a mountain bike equipped with spiked tires and fenders is perfect. The disc brakes come in handy but you can get buy without them.

I also recommend having access to a hose and buying a leaf blower for rinsing off and dry after wet rides in the winter. Assume anytime you bike gets wet in the winter that it has salt on it and rinse off regularly.

If you ride in the winter, be sure to bike across the lakes (assuming we get a normal winter, last winter i only went across twice)
jimbojonez is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-12, 10:18 PM   #9
fastnhard
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Bikes:
Posts: 6
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Madison is an awesome city. I went to school there. Great for biking as well. It's rated in the top 5 cities for biking lifestyle as well if I remember correctly.
fastnhard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-12, 07:10 PM   #10
CPcyclist
Senior Member
 
CPcyclist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Wisconsin
Bikes: Lemond Arrivee, Felt F1 Road, Tomac Revolver(full), GT race (hardtail)
Posts: 1,646
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I second Dream Bike... good for you good for the community...
CPcyclist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-12, 08:14 PM   #11
ImChris
Senior Member
 
ImChris's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Bikes: Trek Madone, Araya commute
Posts: 418
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by CPcyclist View Post
I second Dream Bike... good for you good for the community...

Dream Bike is an amazing option! You can always find great stuff, with great help! Talk to the people there about what you are looking to accomplish with biking and they should be able to show you what they have that fits what you want.

Have fun! Madison is an amazing place to commute by bike. I love it here!

.Chris
ImChris is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:29 AM.