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Old 03-15-17, 06:12 PM   #851
Tommy1955
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BTW, I do have short legs and my stand over is short so I got the 15". I could however stand over the 17.5" but it was touching me (if you know what I mean) and that made me a little nervous at my age. I have enough aches and pains and certainly don't need to worry about that kind of pain too.
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Old 03-16-17, 09:57 AM   #852
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I have a new 2017 FX3 (white) and I absolutely love it. I'm 62 and 5' 6" around 165 lbs.. I ride it almost every day (15 to 20 miles) and 25 to 35 miles on Saturdays and Sundays. Yes I changed the seat but I've changed the seat on every bike I've had so far. I personally think it absorbs bumps well. I did also change the tires and got Bontrager AW2 HardCase Lite tires. I'm glad I did and they roll great. It does have puncture resistant layer with those tires.


I want to take the FX2 and FX3 out on the streets to see how much of a difference there is between the carbon and steel forks, and also how much of a difference the ergo grips and handlebar on the FX3 actually make. Did you ever do a comparison? Also, do these bikes get a lot of flats if you don't have the puncture resistant tires?
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Old 03-16-17, 12:12 PM   #853
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wut size you get?
700 c
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Old 03-16-17, 02:03 PM   #854
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I want to take the FX2 and FX3 out on the streets to see how much of a difference there is between the carbon and steel forks, and also how much of a difference the ergo grips and handlebar on the FX3 actually make. Did you ever do a comparison? Also, do these bikes get a lot of flats if you don't have the puncture resistant tires?
I didn't do a comparison between the FX2 and FX3. I started out with a 2016 Trek FX 7.1 in November of 2016 and had it for a few months. When 2017 got here, I decided to get a new 2017 FX3. I spoke with a Trek representative and told them that I wanted to upgrade by 7.1 bike. They told me that I wouldn't really feel a difference unless I upgraded to at least the new FX 3 with the lighter aluminum frame and carbon forks and that it would have narrower tires and better grips. So I upgraded to the FX3 and I do feel a big difference. As far as how many flats you get, well that really depends on where you ride, the surface of the road/path and how well you watch where you're going. The 2017 FX3 bike comes stock with a 700x32 AW1 tire which has some puncture protection and has metal or steel webbing. The AW2 tires which I bought have the puncture protection but is not steel or metal webbing so it's lighter. I like it a lot and haven't had any flats yet (shouldn't talk about it). Hope this helps.
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Old 03-16-17, 02:21 PM   #855
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700 c
thanks but that's a given. since you mentioned gravel grinding I was curious about the width. 32mm? 35mm? wider?
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Old 03-17-17, 04:30 PM   #856
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Has anyone used a front mounted child bike seat on their Trek FX? My son will be 1 year old soon and I'm looking at getting the Thule RideAlong mini for him so we can go on bike rides.
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Old 03-19-17, 07:53 PM   #857
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Hi everyone! I've never joined a bike forum before, but since I'm closing in on buying a new bike, I thought I'd get some opinions. I've narrowed it down to an FX 2 or an FX 3 as far as the Trek bikes go. I'm waiting for the snow to melt and dry up before the bike shop will let me take one for a short outdoor ride. They have an small indoor loop, but of course every bike feels smooth on a concrete floor, so I want to ride them on the mean streets.


I'm about 5'8", 155lbs, and have recently started biking again. I don't want to be stretched out and in a pushup stance on a bike, and also tend to get a sore neck from looking up when my handle bars are too much lower than my seat, so I'm looking at Hybrids and Fitness bikes. One of my questions is I'm wondering how far up the component chain (especially in the derailleur department) I have to go to have a reliable bike with good longevity. My MTB has Deore but it sounds like I don't need to get up that high since I'll be on city streets and paved bike paths almost 100% of the time on this bike.


Also, how much of a difference do the carbon fork and "ergo" grips make on FX3 as compared to the steel fork and regular grips on the FX2 in regards to smoothing out the ride? I'm trying to drown out road bumps, and also trying to keep excess weight off my hands and wrists (thus the more upright posture of a fitness bike). The 17.5" FX2 felt pretty good on the concrete floor, and I really preferred the seat on it over the one on the FX3 as well, and it kind of ticks me off that if I spend an extra $220 to jump up to the FX3, that I'll then have to spend even more to get a comfy seat. My last question for this post (I swear!) is how important are puncture resistant tires?


Thanks, and hope to hear from you guys!
So I was in the same postion as you. I was looking at both the FX2 and FX3. I was able to test ride the FX2 at lbs near my house and wasn't very impressed. I test rode the FX2 thinking that's where I Wanted to be price wise but liked the idea of the carbon fork on the FX3. So I talked to the sales guy at the lbs and asked if it was worth the extra money. He told me that the carbon fork would definitely soak up more of the road vibrations and that I would be getting better components. At this point I was sold on the FX3 but didn't want to spend the money so I decided to wait and look around. I ended up finding a new 2015 FX 7.4 and a bike shop that was farther away but I got it for under $600 out the door. The FX 7.4 is pretty much like the FX3 and let me tell you I'm glad I got the carbon fork the components feel way nicer also shifting ect...I did change the tires to bontrager Aw2 hard case lite 700x28 and I like these tires more than the 32's. So in my opinion after test riding the bikes go for the FX3 you'll be happier and yes the grips are nicer also.

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Old 03-19-17, 08:53 PM   #858
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Has anyone used a front mounted child bike seat on their Trek FX? My son will be 1 year old soon and I'm looking at getting the Thule RideAlong mini for him so we can go on bike rides.
No I have not used a front mounted seat. I've been using the co-pilot with the blackburn EX-1 rack the rack comes with the seat. I got this seat about 8 years ago and its still holding up well after using it for both of my boys. If you have a smaller frame FX you may need to purchase the longer seat stay brakets for the rack but no big deal you can get brakets for under $10. I like co-pilot seat because it can be removed easy and you have a rear rack for bags if you wanted.
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Old 03-19-17, 09:09 PM   #859
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So I was in the same postion as you. I was looking at both the FX2 and FX3. I was able to test ride the FX2 at lbs near my house and wasn't very impressed. I test rode the FX2 thinking that's where I Wanted to be price wise but liked the idea of the carbon fork on the FX3. So I talked to the sales guy at the lbs and asked if it was worth the extra money. He told me that the carbon fork would definitely soak up more of the road vibrations and that I would be getting better components. At this point I was sold on the FX3 but didn't want to spend the money so I decided to wait and look around. I ended up finding a new 2015 FX 7.4 and a bike shop that was farther away but I got it for under $600 out the door. The FX 7.4 is pretty much like the FX3 and let me tell you I'm glad I got the carbon fork the components feel way nicer also shifting ect...I did change the tires to bontrager Aw2 hard case lite 700x28 and I like these tires more than the 32's. So in my opinion after test riding the bikes go for the FX3 you'll be happier and yes the grips are nicer also.
Interesting to hear that you like the 700x28 better than the 32s. That's about the only thing I might change. I'm riding with AW2 32s but at some point may change to 28s before the 32s wear out completely and keep them for emergency spare tires. My only question would be is that do you think the 28s are a little rougher ride? The bike store commented that I might not really feel a difference but I don't know.
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Old 03-20-17, 07:38 AM   #860
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speedf8 – The fit and components of the Trek FX2 is very good, without overspending for components that provide little to no advantage. I don't have experience with carbon forks, but I can tell you that aluminum frames will provide a big shock if you're experienced only with steel. I didn't like mine after the first 20 mile ride – the stiff frame rattled my teeth out! But I found that some fat slicks (40mm Kenda Kwest), a web sprung seat (Viscount Comfort Plus), ergonomic grips (Ergon GC2-L), and larger flat pedals smoothed it out. I eventually switched out my 110mm handlebar stem for a 90mm to pride a perfect fit for my 25" frame. I doubt puncture resistant tires do much to ward off flats – I resist anything that increases tire cost and weight. Instead, I carry a small pack with a spare tube, repair kit and a small frame-mount pump. I've heard too many horror stories about carbon components, so for me it's a non-starter. I think the FX2 looks better with fat tires, and the ride is fast and stable.
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Old 03-20-17, 07:59 AM   #861
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Interesting to hear that you like the 700x28 better than the 32s. That's about the only thing I might change. I'm riding with AW2 32s but at some point may change to 28s before the 32s wear out completely and keep them for emergency spare tires. My only question would be is that do you think the 28s are a little rougher ride? The bike store commented that I might not really feel a difference but I don't know.
depends where you ride. i went from 32c to 25c on my trek fx 7.4 and the bike is a bit more twitchy now but i do not feel the bumps any more than when i had 32c tires. i must add that parts of my usual route are newly paved but the other, older portions are not so bad to begin with. so if you ride/usual route is very bumpy, i'd stick with the wider tire. if you think you can get away with a narrower tire, you may like it bc it makes the ride faster and pedaling becomes much easier.

hope this helps.
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Old 03-20-17, 10:00 AM   #862
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No I have not used a front mounted seat. I've been using the co-pilot with the blackburn EX-1 rack the rack comes with the seat. I got this seat about 8 years ago and its still holding up well after using it for both of my boys. If you have a smaller frame FX you may need to purchase the longer seat stay brakets for the rack but no big deal you can get brakets for under $10. I like co-pilot seat because it can be removed easy and you have a rear rack for bags if you wanted.
Thanks for the info!
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Old 03-20-17, 10:01 AM   #863
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depends where you ride. i went from 32c to 25c on my trek fx 7.4 and the bike is a bit more twitchy now but i do not feel the bumps any more than when i had 32c tires. i must add that parts of my usual route are newly paved but the other, older portions are not so bad to begin with. so if you ride/usual route is very bumpy, i'd stick with the wider tire. if you think you can get away with a narrower tire, you may like it bc it makes the ride faster and pedaling becomes much easier.

hope this helps.
Thanks, I'm sure you're not familiar with the area but here in Houston, I mainly ride Terry Hershey Park and George Bush Park. All asphalt, some areas concrete and some wood bridges that have wood planks. Some areas are pretty good and some areas have the asphalt kinda torn up due to floods. Maybe I should stick with the 32s instead of the 28s.
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Old 03-20-17, 11:12 AM   #864
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speedf8 The fit and components of the Trek FX2 is very good, without overspending for components that provide little to no advantage. I don't have experience with carbon forks, but I can tell you that aluminum frames will provide a big shock if you're experienced only with steel. I didn't like mine after the first 20 mile ride the stiff frame rattled my teeth out! But I found that some fat slicks (40mm Kenda Kwest), a web sprung seat (Viscount Comfort Plus), ergonomic grips (Ergon GC2-L), and larger flat pedals smoothed it out. I eventually switched out my 110mm handlebar stem for a 90mm to pride a perfect fit for my 25" frame. I doubt puncture resistant tires do much to ward off flats I resist anything that increases tire cost and weight. Instead, I carry a small pack with a spare tube, repair kit and a small frame-mount pump. I've heard too many horror stories about carbon components, so that's a non-starter. I think the FX2 looks better with fat tires, and the ride is fast and stable.


Oh man, I just typed a HUGE update and it floated off into the internet somewhere. Okay, this is going to be a shortened version of that one:


It dried up around here enough on the weekend to be able to test ride bikes outdoors. I was pretty much sold on the FX2, but also tried a Cannondale Quick 7. Turns out the FX2 with its tensile steel fork felt really harsh to me in that I could feel every little imperfection in the road magnified. The Quick 7 has a cromo fork that seems to be at a further angle our from the bike and maybe a little longer, and Cannondale has pulled off a miracle with the frame in that it is designed to absorb bumps and provide "suspension". I even road the $170 (Canadian) more expensive FX3, and it had about the same ride quality as the Quick 7. The FX3 wins hands-down for weight since it's like 2.5-3lbs lighter than the Quick 7, but for the $650 CDN, I'd have to go with the Cannondale.


After taking my MTB out for a 20km ride around the city yesterday, I am now having to really consider whether I can ride a hybrid around here. Having always ridden a beefy MTB, I've never paid attention to how often I have to hop onto of off of curbs to avoid traffic/ road hazards, and how often I ride "offroad" within the city, be it gravel alleys, or non-paved parking lots, etc. For the next couple weeks or so, I'm going to ride my MTB with the mindset that it is a hybrid, and see if I can keep to the streets and something closer to the riding style that a hybrid would require. If I find that I will be able to ride the speedy 700c that I've been dreaming of, it's going to have to be that Cannondale. Normally I wouldn't go on a Trek thread and praise a Cannondale, but we're all riders and the ride is what's important, so I figured that nobody would get too bent out of shape about a different make of bike getting some praise.
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Old 03-20-17, 11:35 AM   #865
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I didn't do a comparison between the FX2 and FX3. I started out with a 2016 Trek FX 7.1 in November of 2016 and had it for a few months. When 2017 got here, I decided to get a new 2017 FX3. I spoke with a Trek representative and told them that I wanted to upgrade by 7.1 bike. They told me that I wouldn't really feel a difference unless I upgraded to at least the new FX 3 with the lighter aluminum frame and carbon forks and that it would have narrower tires and better grips. So I upgraded to the FX3 and I do feel a big difference. As far as how many flats you get, well that really depends on where you ride, the surface of the road/path and how well you watch where you're going. The 2017 FX3 bike comes stock with a 700x32 AW1 tire which has some puncture protection and has metal or steel webbing. The AW2 tires which I bought have the puncture protection but is not steel or metal webbing so it's lighter. I like it a lot and haven't had any flats yet (shouldn't talk about it). Hope this helps.


I was able to try the FX2 and FX3 on the weekend, and the FX3 was way smoother as far as eating up rough roads. I posted about this as well, but I also rode a Cannondale Quick 7, which seemed to have about the same ride as the FX3. The FX3 is 2.5-3lbs lighter and so it felt a lot quicker accelerating, but the Quick 7 won my heart and mind for $170 Canadian less than the FX3.
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Old 03-20-17, 04:01 PM   #866
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I went with the 28's because I wanted to make the bike feel closer to a road bike. If I keep the bike long enough and start to wear out componets I'll gear it more towards road componets. It will be my go fast bike I don't know if I can do a traditional road bike with drop bars. I have a mountian bike so the FX isn't my all around bike. I test rode the Quick also forgot which one but i really like it but the Trek FX 7.4 won in the end.
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Old 03-20-17, 04:04 PM   #867
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Can anyone suggest spd pedals that won't break the bank? Also anyone have a topeak sidekick in small size, what do you think?
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Old 03-21-17, 06:44 AM   #868
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I don't know if I can do a traditional road bike with drop bars. I have a mountian bike so the FX isn't my all around bike.
I am with you 100% re: drop bars. After my trek fx 7.4, I bought a $3,400 trek emonda sl6 with drop bars. I bought it bc I felt maybe I was missing out on something due to so many people riding drop bars. I was wrong. I much prefer the fx over the sl6. Why? The flat bar vs the road/drop bar.

I feel like I don't have as good of a control over the drop bars - specifically since my hands are bent and hanging onto the hoods bc that's where the brakes are. The flat bar feels so much more confidence inspiring and natural to me. I can ride the top of the drop bar in a similar position to the flat bar BUT the drop bar positioning is far too narrow for me.

I'm still giving myself maybe this season to mull over my opinion of drop bars. I will swap them out for flat bars if I still feel like I dislike them after riding the bike this season.

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Old 03-21-17, 08:15 AM   #869
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After taking my MTB out for a 20km ride around the city yesterday, I am now having to really consider whether I can ride a hybrid around here. Having always ridden a beefy MTB, I've never paid attention to how often I have to hop onto of off of curbs to avoid traffic/ road hazards, and how often I ride "offroad" within the city, be it gravel alleys, or non-paved parking lots, etc. For the next couple weeks or so, I'm going to ride my MTB with the mindset that it is a hybrid, and see if I can keep to the streets and something closer to the riding style that a hybrid would require. If I find that I will be able to ride the speedy 700c that I've been dreaming of, it's going to have to be that Cannondale. Normally I wouldn't go on a Trek thread and praise a Cannondale, but we're all riders and the ride is what's important, so I figured that nobody would get too bent out of shape about a different make of bike getting some praise.
Sounds like a Trek DS or Specialized Crosstrail or Cannondale Quick CX is more of what you're looking for. Get one with the hydraulic lockout for the suspension and you are set.

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I am with you 100% re: drop bars. After my trek fx 7.4, I bought a $3,400 trek emonda sl6 with drop bars. I bought it bc I felt maybe I was missing out on something due to so many people riding drop bars. I was wrong. I much prefer the fx over the sl6. Why? The flat bar vs the road/drop bar.

I feel like I don't have as good of a control over the drop bars - specifically since my hands are bent and hanging onto the hoods bc that's where the brakes are. The flat bar feels so much more confidence inspiring and natural to me. I can ride the top of the drop bar in a similar position to the flat bar BUT the drop bar positioning is far too narrow for me.

I'm still giving myself maybe this season to mull over my opinion of drop bars. I will swap them out for flat bars if I still feel like I dislike them after riding the bike this season.
I have found that drop bars aren't enjoyable if you don't ride on roads or paved paths with long straights. I think the reason I feel this way is because drop bars are really fun when you want to go fast. If you don't ride roads/paved paths that allow you to go fast, I feel like you lose the fun with drop bars. Of course there is also the issue with possible back and neck and shoulder pain. This is why I prefer my Madone with flat bars or the Trek FX for my type of riding.
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Old 03-21-17, 02:20 PM   #870
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@rumrunn6 can't speak for the other poster @aurelian07 however, I've used a 2016 trek 7.2 with the stock H2 hard case lite tires in the 35 width for 500 miles of gravel last season. They worked fine, as you typically do not need actual "tread" running on gravel. They do have some puncture protection, and they held up well, but they are heavy, which is pretty typical for OEM tires where the manufacturer is trying to put a tire on that resists flats, and basic all-arounder, but these tires in a 35 width come in at a pretty chunky 635 grams per each.

I do like the 35 size width-wise. I can't tell substantial difference when I went down to a 33 by Clemente with their cyclocross mxp gravel tire...very supple, does gravel nicely and roads. Currently testing some Kenda Kwik Trax 32's that came on a C'Dale Quick 4....do not like the ride. I don't think it is the size, but the stiff sidewalls(30 tpi) are not my cup of tea. They handle and roll on gravel ok, but find them somewhat harsh and doggy on pavement. I told myself I'd give them 100 miles on gravel before ditching, which should be the next week or so...then, on go the Compass Rat Trap Pass 700x35's....MUCH nicer ride, roll very fast (have on yet another bike).

If you're looking at options, I've also got a lot of road and gravel miles on a set of 700x38 Challenge Gravel Grinders. Also a really good supple light weight tire. File tread for the contact patch with side nubs. Rolls fast on road and gravel, very plush.
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Old 03-21-17, 02:24 PM   #871
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A few thoughts on flat vs drop bars, and fat vs skinny tires:
Orlando has made some bike-centric improvements by adding bike lanes and bike paths wherever they can. But their attempts fall short because many roads are already too narrow and shop keepers insist on maintaining convenient parking. We also experience a lot of road maintenance around town, so, bike lanes often end where construction or a row of parked cars begins. For me it adds interest having to constantly juggle between the road, sidewalk, and the occasional dirt/grass path. This is what the hybrid was built for and it makes me wonder how the road biker contends with these challenges. My impression is that many of them feel entitled to the road as they zip through dangerous passages at a fast clip, and they may well be. But we've also experienced a lot of bicycling deaths due to collisions with cars. I can't help but think that riding fast, in a "heads-down" posture has something to do with it. So I've adopted a personal protocol for metropolitan riding. I've relinquished the desire for speed in exchange for a more casual, sightseeing appeal. With flat/riser bars and fat tires, I feel confident negotiating curb cuts and rough pavement. The "heads-up" posture facilitates readiness for sudden door and pedestrian hazards with my hands always near the brake levers. A quick trip for me averages 17mph, but I'm just as happy at 13mph. I think this attitude is in keeping with the better spirit of the adventure, which can also affect the way car drivers react to your presence. What do you think?
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Old 03-21-17, 02:54 PM   #872
rumrunn6
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@rumrunn6 If you're looking at options, I've also got a lot of road and gravel miles on a set of 700x38 Challenge Gravel Grinders. Also a really good supple light weight tire. File tread for the contact patch with side nubs. Rolls fast on road and gravel, very plush.
oh hey thanks! end of January I started thinking about tires. cpl weeks later I got a set of WTB Riddlers 700x45. finally got to ride them mid March! very happy but it was an interesting challenge to fenderize my bikes to fit them. got them on an old hybrid but will be moving them to my FX in coming weeks
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Old 03-21-17, 04:21 PM   #873
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A couple more thoughts on flat vs drop bars, fat vs skinny tires:
Orlando has made some bike-centric improvements by adding bike lanes and bike paths wherever they can. But they often fall short because some roads are too narrow and shop keepers insist on maintaining convenient parking. We're also experiencing a lot of road maintenance around town, so, bike lanes often end where construction or a row of parked cars begins. It adds interest for me since I have to constantly juggle between the road, sidewalk, and the occasional dirt/grass path. This is what the hybrid was built for – and it makes me wonder how the road biker contends with these challenges. My impression is that many of them feel that they are entitled to the road as they zip through dangerous passages at a fast clip, and they may well be. But we've also experienced a lot of bicycling deaths due to collisions with cars. I can't help but think that riding fast, in a "heads-down" posture has something to do with it. So I've adopted a personal protocol for street riding. I've relinquished the desire for speed in exchange for a more casual, sightseeing appeal. With flat/riser bars and fat tires, I feel confident negotiating curb cuts and rough pavement. The "heads-up" posture facilitates readiness for sudden door and pedestrian hazards with my hands always near the brake levers. A quick trip for me averages 17mph, but I'm just as happy at 13mph. I think this attitude is in keeping with the better spirit of the adventure, which can also affect the way car drivers react to your presence. What do you think?
Those are good points. For that kind of riding, the hybrid with the flat bars have the advantage.

I believe roadies do take up the road when they need to for their safety. Just like how they take the whole lane during a turn if a car is coming up behind them on mountain roads. More than likely, they avoid roads like the ones you mentioned. When riding in the city, the idea is to find roads with low traffic volume even if it means taking a back alley over a congested road with bike lanes. That way you decrease the chances of running into accidents. If they do that, then I think they will be fine with drop bars. Otherwise, they will have to ride on the hoods most of the time so they can access the brakes faster. However, riding slow in a road bike is not fun and that is also when my butt hurts.
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Old 03-21-17, 05:35 PM   #874
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A couple more thoughts on flat vs drop bars, fat vs skinny tires:
Orlando has made some bike-centric improvements by adding bike lanes and bike paths wherever they can. But they often fall short because some roads are too narrow and shop keepers insist on maintaining convenient parking. We're also experiencing a lot of road maintenance around town, so, bike lanes often end where construction or a row of parked cars begins. It adds interest for me since I have to constantly juggle between the road, sidewalk, and the occasional dirt/grass path. This is what the hybrid was built for and it makes me wonder how the road biker contends with these challenges. My impression is that many of them feel that they are entitled to the road as they zip through dangerous passages at a fast clip, and they may well be. But we've also experienced a lot of bicycling deaths due to collisions with cars. I can't help but think that riding fast, in a "heads-down" posture has something to do with it. So I've adopted a personal protocol for street riding. I've relinquished the desire for speed in exchange for a more casual, sightseeing appeal. With flat/riser bars and fat tires, I feel confident negotiating curb cuts and rough pavement. The "heads-up" posture facilitates readiness for sudden door and pedestrian hazards with my hands always near the brake levers. A quick trip for me averages 17mph, but I'm just as happy at 13mph. I think this attitude is in keeping with the better spirit of the adventure, which can also affect the way car drivers react to your presence. What do you think?

I like how you think.
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Old 03-28-17, 07:31 AM   #875
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thanks but that's a given. since you mentioned gravel grinding I was curious about the width. 32mm? 35mm? wider?
I will have to look at them, there is still snow in New Brunswick . I'm still waiting for the sun
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