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Old 09-22-15, 07:38 PM   #1
ganchan
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Second (more upright) handlebar position for Jamis Coda Sport?

My Jamis Coda Sport has a fairly aggressive flat-bar rider position -- which is exactly what I need 90 percent of the time. Sometimes, however, I'd like a second hand position -- NOT a more "aero" position (I'm already aero enough), but an upright "comfort bike" position so I can flex by back, straighten out my neck, and take in a better view for a minute or two before going back to my regular position.

Is there some kind of handlebar or bar-end arrangement that would give me both the Coda's default aggressive position and a more upright position? Maybe bar ends that sweep straight back (or back and slightly downward), or a handlebar like this Nitto, only flipped toward me?.... http://www.amazon.com/Nitto-B263AA-b.../dp/B005M9CND6

Last edited by ganchan; 09-22-15 at 08:10 PM.
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Old 09-22-15, 11:48 PM   #2
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North Roads or cruiser bars.
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Old 09-23-15, 12:16 AM   #3
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Old 09-23-15, 05:28 AM   #4
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Have you looked at trekking bars? If not, the ol drop bar does all that albeit at a higher cost.

You can also google "alt bars" for other options.

I wouldnt recommend an adjustable stem for on-the-fly adjustments. Changing angles on that stem requires practically disassembling the entire front end
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Old 09-23-15, 10:57 AM   #5
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Yeah, a North Road or similar has the classic look that would go well with this bike. But from my current rider position, leaning into the bar as I am, it's hard to visualize what the different bar shape would do to my position -- and I think the default position might be a little more upright than ideal. Anyone here tried this style of bar on Jamis Coda Sport?

What about mustache bars? Are the inner sections of the bar comfortable to ride in for extended periods?

Regarding the trekking bar, I'm not sure how that style would give me a more upright option. Would I maybe raise the stem, so that the aero position on the trekking bars equals my current flat-bar level? I'm not real familiar with this bar's various possibilities....
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Old 09-23-15, 11:02 AM   #6
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I would use a shorter and/or more upright stem with the stock bars, then install a set of bar ends to get close to the original stretched out position.

FWIW, this is what makes drop bars so great - they give multiple hand positions without modifications - set them up so riding on the brake hoods or in the drops is comfortable most of the time, then use the bar tops as an upright position. If you use my above idea of shorter stem and bar ends, the bar ends can duplicate riding on the brake hoods - the most commonly used drop bar position.

Also, when I really want to sit up and relax for a few minutes, I ride no hands and stretch my back and neck out.
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Old 09-23-15, 12:56 PM   #7
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Regarding the trekking bar, I'm not sure how that style would give me a more upright option. Would I maybe raise the stem, so that the aero position on the trekking bars equals my current flat-bar level? I'm not real familiar with this bar's various possibilities....
A shorter reach effectively raises your position.
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Old 09-23-15, 02:22 PM   #8
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I wouldnt recommend an adjustable stem for on-the-fly adjustments. Changing angles on that stem requires practically disassembling the entire front end
So loosening and retightening 3 bolts equates to disassembling the entire front end?
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Old 09-23-15, 04:47 PM   #9
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Its seven bolts at least. Eight if you loosen the preload

This stem requires removing the faceplate in order to seperate it enough to change the angle. Plus, the handlebar angle changes when your stem angle changes. However, loosening it is not enough to change the angle.

I dont remember if the top cap can stay or not, but at this point your front end is practically undone.

I have one, and I wouldnt recommend it for on-the-fly adjustments. Maybe yours is different
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Old 09-23-15, 07:49 PM   #10
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I had a similar stem to the one Doctor Morbius mentioned - actually on a Coda Sport - and it required exactly three screws to adjust the stem: the angle bolt on the side of the stem and two of the bolts in the front plate of the stem to allow you to slightly rotate the handlebar within the stem so your brake levers and shifters retain their position relative to the bar.

This was the more upright position:

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Old 09-23-15, 09:09 PM   #11
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Its seven bolts at least. Eight if you loosen the preload

This stem requires removing the faceplate in order to seperate it enough to change the angle. Plus, the handlebar angle changes when your stem angle changes. However, loosening it is not enough to change the angle.

I dont remember if the top cap can stay or not, but at this point your front end is practically undone.

I have one, and I wouldnt recommend it for on-the-fly adjustments. Maybe yours is different
Yours must be a lot different. 3 bolts tops. The Zoom stem on my MTB only requires 2 bolts to be loosened and retightened.

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Old 09-24-15, 10:12 AM   #12
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I would use a shorter and/or more upright stem with the stock bars, then install a set of bar ends to get close to the original stretched out position.

FWIW, this is what makes drop bars so great - they give multiple hand positions without modifications - set them up so riding on the brake hoods or in the drops is comfortable most of the time, then use the bar tops as an upright position. If you use my above idea of shorter stem and bar ends, the bar ends can duplicate riding on the brake hoods - the most commonly used drop bar position.

Also, when I really want to sit up and relax for a few minutes, I ride no hands and stretch my back and neck out.
Yep. My default position is on the hoods, but on longer rides, I will use the bends and the tops to give my hands and back a change of position.

Unfortunately, switching from flat bars to drops is a bit expensive and cumbersome, and so you might want to look into bar ends, swept back bars, riser bars, or trekking bars.

Another possibility is the Jones H bar, which offers a wide, swept back position, a neutral position, and an aero position. Another variation of this is the Velo Orange Casey Crazy bar.
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Old 09-24-15, 10:38 AM   #13
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Its been a while since I regreased that headset so I tore it apart.

Here is why you need to disassemble the entire stem on the model you first posted: the detents are the entire length of the bore. It makes for a strong connection but assembly / reassembly is a chore, especially since the large screw acts as a third cinch bolt. It turns out that you don't need to remove the faceplate completely, but the preload cap needs to be loosened and readjusted. So its six bolts on this particular stem



The stem I have is identical to the first picture you posted.



In any case, I still wouldn't recommend an adjustable stem for OP. Do you guys really dismount, adjust the stem, and ride on? A proper handlebar set to the right height seems like a better option.

Adjustable stems are great for finding your ideal position on a new bike, but on-the-fly adjustments seem too much of a hassle - even if it is "only" 3 bolts.
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Old 09-24-15, 11:04 AM   #14
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Another possibility is the Jones H bar, which offers a wide, swept back position, a neutral position, and an aero position. Another variation of this is the Velo Orange Casey Crazy bar.
Of those two, the Velo is definitely closer to my budget range, though trekking bars would be closer still. Never been a big fan of bike tape in general, but maybe I can get some rubberized "grip gloves" that would make it a non-issue...or cover the bars with foam instead.

Oddly enough, on yesterday's ride I felt more upright than I had previously. Maybe it's a matter of perspective, or of getting used to the new posture after coming from a comfort bike.

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Old 09-24-15, 11:07 AM   #15
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Of those two, the Velo is definitely closer to my budget range, though trekking bars would be closer still. Never been a big fan of bike tape in general, but maybe I can get some rubberized "grip gloves" that would make it a non-issue....

Oddly enough, on yesterday's ride I felt more upright than I had previously. Maybe it's a matter of perspective, or of getting used to the new posture after coming from a comfort bike.
Bar tape is awesome, as it doesn't limit you to just the one grip position. I like the idea of the Jones bar and the Casey Crazy Bar for flat bar hybrids, but haven't made the switch myself, as my hybrid and mountain bikes are pretty much relegated to backup bikes these days.
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Old 09-29-15, 10:57 PM   #16
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The VO Porteur is starting to look good to me....

VO Porteur Handlebar
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Old 09-30-15, 09:27 AM   #17
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The VO Porteur is starting to look good to me....

VO Porteur Handlebar

I had an earlier version of those - I can't remember who made them but they looked pretty much identical. They were the least comfortable handlebar I have ever used. I gave them to my buddy who uses them on his café bike, but acknowledges that they are hella uncomfortable and he wouldn't use them if the café was more than one km away.
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Old 09-30-15, 10:18 AM   #18
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I had an earlier version of those - I can't remember who made them but they looked pretty much identical. They were the least comfortable handlebar I have ever used. I gave them to my buddy who uses them on his café bike, but acknowledges that they are hella uncomfortable and he wouldn't use them if the café was more than one km away.
That'a a pity. I like the minimal rise on them....

So far in my researches, Albatross bars are leading the field in terms of wrist comfort. but I was riding my flat bar today, and honestly, I'm not quite sure how much room for sweep-back I've got. I like the idea of a more natural wrist position in the longterm, because I'm a writer and I want to protect the ol' carpal tunnels and such. So far, though, the flat bar isn't causing any significant discomfort. The ergonomic grips on it also let me rest on my palms, which might not be good in the long run but at least takes my thumbs out of the equation. (I have arthritis in the top joint of both thumbs.) I wonder if a North Road-style bar would create any extra thumb pressure.... I'd better talk to my LBS....
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Old 09-30-15, 11:55 AM   #19
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That'a a pity. I like the minimal rise on them....

So far in my researches, Albatross bars are leading the field in terms of wrist comfort. but I was riding my flat bar today, and honestly, I'm not quite sure how much room for sweep-back I've got. I like the idea of a more natural wrist position in the longterm, because I'm a writer and I want to protect the ol' carpal tunnels and such. So far, though, the flat bar isn't causing any significant discomfort. The ergonomic grips on it also let me rest on my palms, which might not be good in the long run but at least takes my thumbs out of the equation. (I have arthritis in the top joint of both thumbs.) I wonder if a North Road-style bar would create any extra thumb pressure.... I'd better talk to my LBS....
If flat bars are almost comfortable enough, then flat bars + bar ends could give you another hand position to move to when you get tired. Minimal investment, possible big payout.
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