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  1. #1
    Ha ha ha ha ha giantcfr1's Avatar
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    Reviw your hybrid here if you've owned and ridden it for 3 or more years

    My 2007 Cannondale Bad Boy disc:

    I got my Bad Boy after I had a head on accident with a motorbike whilst riding my Giant CFR1.
    For the price of a replacement carbon frame I was able to take ownership of a complete hybrid, (after negotiating with insurance) for half the price.

    Now to the shock of many here, I bought the bike unseen and for looks only.
    My friend had a matte black Cannondale Capo Optimo which I absolutely loved, so I went to a shop and asked what other Cannondale came with the same looks.
    The shop assistant search the web, and I loved the look of the Bad Boy, and asked him to order one for me.
    When it finally arrived I was amazed at the quality components it had.
    I was instantly happy with the size and geometry and rode it home.

    Over the past 8 years it's had many changes with only two major disappointments. The Avid bb5 calipers it came with both failed the same way.
    The calipers have a small weak spring which snapped in both instances.
    The OEM seatpost snapped but thankfully no crash due to it.

    I only replaced parts as they wore out, except in later years when I wanted to bling it up a bit.
    Points of interest which are still original are the Sunrim rims, Shimano hubs, Shimano cranks, frame and fork, headset, sram front shifter and sram rear derailleur, and bottom bracket. The Sram Front shifter and derailleur are in working condition, but I decided to go 1 x 9.

    I replaced the following as bling only because of fading... handlebars, stem, seatpost clamp and saddle.
    I replaced the following for performance only... chainring, hydraulic brakes and rear cassette.

    Overall this bike is one I have no intention of ever replacing. It has evolved over the years into my perfect go to bike.
    Original form...
    Current form...
    Last edited by giantcfr1; 11-29-15 at 05:04 AM.
    Road Bike: 2004 ORBEA Mitis2+Carbon, Freekin' groovy Urban / Mountain Road Cruising Bike: 2007 CANNONDALE Bad Boy Disc, MTB: 2012 Trek Gary Fisher Collection Marlin WSD 29er

  2. #2
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    2010 Specialized Sirrus Comp. Bought it new in '10, and rode it more or less stock (Specialized Bicycle Components) for a full season with only the following changes:

    1. Had the stock wheels re-tensioned etc. before it left the store;
    2. Added XT pedals, Ergon grips, and Spec. Avatar saddle (hated the stock one).

    Frame/fork fit perfectly, rode well, and the bike all-up (w/pedals) was decently light -- around 21.5 lbs. So, I decided to re-make it to my liking Spring 2011 and replaced the drive-train, brakeset and tires. Also changed out the headset to one with proper sealed-cartridge bearings:

    1. SRAM Apex/Rival mix, w/10spd Double-tap flatbar shifters;
    2. TRP CX-9 brakes w/Avid SD7 levers;
    3. XTR/Dura-ace cables (brake/shift); and
    4. Conti GP4000II tires (25).

    Spring '14, added Giant PRSL1 wheelset and this past Spring Spec. Roubaix Pro (new series) tires in 30/32 width. Result is as pic below; weight is now 19.5 lbs. on the nose, with pedals:

    Sirrus 15.jpg

    Since 2011 the bike has been completely trouble-free; just routine maintenance, new chain/cassette -- the usual.

    Unless I were to change to another bike to cover the same riding, I won't be getting rid of this one -- no reason to. I've been mulling over both the Giant Toughroad SLR1 and the Spec. Crosstrail Pro ('16) -- ability to run wider tires still and front suspension respectively -- but unless I convince myself I need one or the other I won't bother.

    If, as is likely, I keep the Sirrus for at least another season I will go to a 1x10 drivetrain: strip off the front der./shifter and change out crank to Rival 1/38 tooth chainring. I've test-ridden 1x10 and 1x11 'road' set-ups, and really like them; a bit more weight off the bike would just be an added treat, but wouldn't be the reason for making the change.
    "Tragedy is when I cut my finger. Comedy is when you fall into an open sewer and die." Mel Brooks

  3. #3
    The Improbable Bulk Little Darwin's Avatar
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    My 2003 Giant Sedona DX has held up to my extra large body very well.

    I have gone through several sets of tires, and finally wore out the saddle and pedals a few years back. I rode it with clipless pedals for a while.

    About 5 or 6 years ago, I swapped the fork for a chromoly suspension corrected rigid fork which improved the ride immensely. Also about 3 years ago I swapped out the grip shifters for some trigger shifters.

    Last year my Giant was relegated to the backup role in my stable because I stumbled upon a nice used Trek 7.3 FX at a great price, and wanted to switch to 700c.

    The Sedona was virtually trouble free for the 10 years it served as my primary bike at weights ranging from 300-365 pounds. I did have to have one broken spoke replaced on the rear wheel, and have the wheel trued. But, at my weight, with riding mostly on gravel and crushed stone, I consider that pretty good.

    I rode 3 metric centuries during the years I rode the bike, and failed at another, but that was because of the rider, not the bike.

    Shifting has always been crisp.

    The only real down side is that for me the suspension seat post, and suspension fork were unnecessary. Without a lockout, the fork was a real power robber, especially when climbing hills at my weight, it would go through the whole length of its travel every time I pedaled. The preload adjustment was virtually useless for me as well... No significant reduction in the pogo stick effect. Within a few months of riding it, I did discover that I could completely lock the suspension seat post, which I did.

    It had all the mount points I needed for a rear rack and water bottles, and did well with fenders when I used them briefly.

    As routine maintenance I did replace the chain more often than I needed to, just to make sure it worked problem free, and replaced the cassette twice when it started to look worn.

    Over all, a nice $350 investment over 10 years ago.
    Slow Ride Cyclists of NEPA

    People do not seem to realize that their opinion of the world is also a confession of character.
    - Ralph Waldo Emerson

  4. #4
    Ha ha ha ha ha giantcfr1's Avatar
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    Thank you for supporting this thread, lads.
    I believe it shows that by purchasing the right bike first up, allows us to enjoy many years of care free cycling, as long as simple maintenance is followed.
    I urge our fellow riders to learn the basics, and be more involved / responsible in their bike maintenance. Upgrading and replacing components is part of the joy of cycling.
    Road Bike: 2004 ORBEA Mitis2+Carbon, Freekin' groovy Urban / Mountain Road Cruising Bike: 2007 CANNONDALE Bad Boy Disc, MTB: 2012 Trek Gary Fisher Collection Marlin WSD 29er

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by giantcfr1 View Post
    Thank you for supporting this thread, lads.
    I believe it shows that by purchasing the right bike first up, allows us to enjoy many years of care free cycling, as long as simple maintenance is followed.
    I urge our fellow riders to learn the basics, and be more involved / responsible in their bike maintenance. Upgrading and replacing components is part of the joy of cycling.
    I thought and think this a very good idea, gcfr1. Most of us have 'new bike lust' -- I certainly am susceptible to shiny new things -- but the simple fact is that if one's existing frame/fork is well made, light enough, rides well and fits correctly, 'new bike' doesn't do a damn thing except add shiny! The only real exception to that is if one finds oneself wanting to make a substantive change, e.g. in 'hybrids' wants to obtain/get rid of front suspension, or wants wider tire capacity -- that kind of thing. So I think a 'keepers/updating' thread is a very good idea.
    "Tragedy is when I cut my finger. Comedy is when you fall into an open sewer and die." Mel Brooks

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by badger1 View Post
    I thought and think this a very good idea, gcfr1. Most of us have 'new bike lust' -- I certainly am susceptible to shiny new things -- but the simple fact is that if one's existing frame/fork is well made, light enough, rides well and fits correctly, 'new bike' doesn't do a damn thing except add shiny! The only real exception to that is if one finds oneself wanting to make a substantive change, e.g. in 'hybrids' wants to obtain/get rid of front suspension, or wants wider tire capacity -- that kind of thing. So I think a 'keepers/updating' thread is a very good idea.
    @giantcfr1That's a beautiful Cannondale. Ive always had a soft spot for the handmade in USA Cannondales. Hmmm.... my size
    @badger1
    That's a nice bike I would like to own. Nice weight. My size too

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by DorkDisk View Post
    @giantcfr1That's a beautiful Cannondale. Ive always had a soft spot for the handmade in USA Cannondales. Hmmm.... my size
    @badger1
    That's a nice bike I would like to own. Nice weight. My size too
    Thanks, DD -- it's been a great bike for this old man. Specialized (well, Merida of course) didn't make that frame for the Sirrus for very long; just a couple of years, I think: E5 main frame w/carbon seat stays and fork. I knew when I tried it out back in '10 that it was/could be the basis for a great 'all round' bike. Stock drivetrain was clunky/heavy (old Tiagra triple), and the brakes were awful, but the potential was there.

    BTW, I share your like for gcfr1's 'Dale; told him so often enough!
    "Tragedy is when I cut my finger. Comedy is when you fall into an open sewer and die." Mel Brooks

  8. #8
    Ha ha ha ha ha giantcfr1's Avatar
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    Thanks guys. I always appreciate compliments on my Cannondale. Here on the Gold Coast, I've never seen another. It's surprising the number of people that ask me what it is at traffic lights. I'm used to the brand variety of Kyoto, and am greatly disappointed at the lack of variety here on the Gold Coast. (Sadly I moved back here in April)
    Road Bike: 2004 ORBEA Mitis2+Carbon, Freekin' groovy Urban / Mountain Road Cruising Bike: 2007 CANNONDALE Bad Boy Disc, MTB: 2012 Trek Gary Fisher Collection Marlin WSD 29er

  9. #9
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    A writeup (aka reviw) of this hybridized fred sled:

    One day around 1998 I found this 1985 Shogun Kaze "funny bike" nestled between some new tricycles and children`s bikes. It was <30 days to my birthday and it was so priced so low I rationalized that I would be losing money by not buying it. It also was a rescue bike, I couldn't leave it there next to tricycles. I have a heart

    The Kaze looked a bit large for me, but I have long legs and can straddle some huge frames and the odd geometry looked like it could work. I didn't even test ride it - couldn't, as it had a flat front tire. About three years later, I stumbled upon a Kaze frame in a smaller size so I bought it and transferred all the parts over. Kaze in my life was meant to be

    image069.jpg

    The made-in-Japan frame has a lugged Tange 2 tubeset, hellenic seatstays (meets forward of seat tube) , semi-horizontal dropouts, and a radically downward sloping toptube. Main tubes are straight, round, and small diameter which looks good on old bicycles. The seatstays are tapered and the chainstays are ovalized and tapered. The lugs are not fancy but have some nice curves to them. Other details include a pump peg at the head tube and a chain catcher on the drive side chainstay. The fork has a fully sloped crown and still looks odd to me after all these years with its short legs and long steerer tube. The frame has a very 80s fade paint job and graphics. Tange 2 had 0.9/0.6/0.9 mm walls and frames weigh in the 4.75-5lb range IIRC and I would guesstimate the complete weight at around 22lbs.

    This bike has a complete 600EX (eventually became Ultegra) gruppo, minus seatpost but with the 600 aero pedals. Unlike today, bikes then had complete gruppos, including headset, bottom bracket, hubs, quick releases and often even pedals and seatposts; and this bike is no exception. This was Shimano's first generation indexing and also came with 42/52t biopace ovalized chainrings. The cranks are silver with flat arms for a long lasting finish that makes it easy to detect damage. The shifter are down-tube mounted which requires a slight balance shift because of the further placing due to the frame's geometry. The derailleurs are all metal, good looking, smooth, lightweight, and shift perfectly. The headset has beautiful cutaways on the locknuts. The brakes are single pivot with wheel guides and brake well with good modulation. The front wheel is a 24" 28h - laced radially for a lighter, stiffer, and more aero wheel while the 700c rear is more conventionally laced. Rims are Araya tubular old school - hard annodized and narrow.

    The rest of the original build was a Nitto stem with a custom negative rise that matches the top tube angle, Nitto aero bars, and a SR fluted Al seatpost. Riding this bike, I'm reminded of how little drivetrain tech has changed. The old stuff works flawlessly. In fact, nothing beats a double crankset with friction shifting (and modern rings). Overall, this bike is a good example of a mid-low priced Japanese bike of the mid 80s - good quality and a little bland.

    Steel is smooth. But not this bike. This is a stiff bike, both laterally (good) and vertically (not too good.) The small radial laced wheel and compact angles of the frame send every jolt straight up your scranium. In all fairness, this is a go fast bike - it sacrifices comfort for speed, which is its design goal, and it does that very well. I am definitely not a high top speed rider, I still have a stash of 48t dura ace chainrings I used on 130bcd road cranks before compact gearing came out. I'm a skinny off road climber and spin a high cadence. Even this 145lb weakling can flex some frames though, but this bike takes it all and turns it into forward motion. I only know two words in Japanese, and "kaze" is one of them - like I said, this bike and I was meant to be. "Kaze" means "wind" in Japanese and I think its a speed metaphor, not a comfort one.

    The bike was used mostly as specced - I threw on some round 39/48 rings and some clipless pedals. Chain is an old Sachs SL - my all-time favorite. One day I cracked an old brittle washer on the right shifter so I replaced them with modern indexed Sunrace 6 sp, which I must admit actually shift better than the old 600. The front has a Suntour-like micro ratchet mechanism which gives great tactile and acoustic feedback.

    It was the quest for a more comfortable ride that led me to do a simple flat bar conversion a few years ago. The parts I used were:

    Nitto Pearl stem - Higher rise and longer quill for a more upright position.
    Generic crabon flatbar - To soak up bumps and improve weight balance. 25.4 for more compliance
    Tektro BMX brake levers - cheap, with great ergonomics
    cheap Kraton grips
    Nitto handlebar shim - for 25.4 bar in 26.0 stem.

    The modifications were surprisingly effective. The crabon bars did wonders for comfort - soaking up much of the road chatter. Weight balance is further aft which adds confidence on fast corners and aids handling on sketchy conditions. Its still fast and uncomfortable so its essential nature has not changed. I would like to eventually add a modern wheelset - better rims and clincher for easier maintenance. I've considered running thumbshifters but I rather like the fact that shifting takes a bit more effort; it adds to the unforgiving nature of this bike and makes me a better rider.

    image072.jpg image070.jpg image071.jpg

    The Shogun Kaze occupies the "speedy road-bias hybrid" category within my fred sled flotilla. All in, I have about $200 sunk into this bike. This is the bike I use the least but it remains one of my favorites because it has personality (is ugly and quirky)

  10. #10
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    You absolutely cannot part with your Kaze, DD. It is so odd it is beautiful, to my eyes (and yes, that's a compliment). BTW, I think the flat-bars improve the look.
    Great story!
    "Tragedy is when I cut my finger. Comedy is when you fall into an open sewer and die." Mel Brooks

  11. #11
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    2001 Giant Cypress DX, bought it new Oct 2000, and it's been a fantastic bike, with over 20,000 miles since. I've replaced the pedals, tires, cranks, BB, chain, freewheel, rear derailleur, and all the brake and shifter cables. 99% rode on paved trails and roads in Florida, I've maintained it extremely well, and still looks really good. Though, the frame seems to be flexing a bit more and the forks are shot, so today I ordered a 2016 Fuji Crosstown 1.1 disc. Going to retire the Giant to a guest/rain bike because I just can't see it leave me.

    Just cleaned it up and removed my tool bag and bar bag for a 25 mile charity bike ride tomorrow.


  12. #12
    Ha ha ha ha ha giantcfr1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DorkDisk View Post
    A writeup (aka reviw) of this hybridized fred sled:

    One day around 1998 I found this 1985 Shogun Kaze "funny bike" ...I only know two words in Japanese, and "kaze" is one of them - like I said, this bike and I was meant to be. "Kaze" means "wind" in Japanese and I think its a speed metaphor, not a comfort one. ...
    Love it....It reminds me of my time in Japan. There was a messenger company called Kaze. I've always had a fascination with Japanese TT bikes.
    Last edited by giantcfr1; 12-05-15 at 06:21 AM.
    Road Bike: 2004 ORBEA Mitis2+Carbon, Freekin' groovy Urban / Mountain Road Cruising Bike: 2007 CANNONDALE Bad Boy Disc, MTB: 2012 Trek Gary Fisher Collection Marlin WSD 29er

  13. #13
    Ha ha ha ha ha giantcfr1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scooty Puff Jr View Post
    2001 Giant Cypress DX, bought it new Oct 2000, and it's been a fantastic bike, with over 20,000 miles since. I've replaced the pedals, tires, cranks, BB, chain, freewheel, rear derailleur, and all the brake and shifter cables. 99% rode on paved trails and roads in Florida, I've maintained it extremely well, and still looks really good. Though, the frame seems to be flexing a bit more and the forks are shot, so today I ordered a 2016 Fuji Crosstown 1.1 disc. Going to retire the Giant to a guest/rain bike because I just can't see it leave me.

    Just cleaned it up and removed my tool bag and bar bag for a 25 mile charity bike ride tomorrow.

    Thanks for your review. Good luck on your ride
    Road Bike: 2004 ORBEA Mitis2+Carbon, Freekin' groovy Urban / Mountain Road Cruising Bike: 2007 CANNONDALE Bad Boy Disc, MTB: 2012 Trek Gary Fisher Collection Marlin WSD 29er

  14. #14
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    I got a Giant Escape 2 years ago and have been very happy with it. I was looking for a bike that was close to being a flat bar road bike and this one fit the bill. Aluminum frame with a carbon fork, 9-speed with a triple crank. I swapped out the tires and shortened the handlebar and added toe clips. (I've also used clipless.) I ride with other who use road bikes and I go right along with them except on hills. It weighs about 28 pounds. Because of the range of gears I can get up just about any hill, but not very quickly. The Altus and Acera components have been okay. The brakes need adjusting too frequently (maybe I'm a poor mechanic). I really enjoy this bike but recently picked up a used cross bike that weighs about 20 pounds and comes with a 10-speed double with a good range of gears (12-32T). I've only ridden it a few times so far, but it may become my number one.

  15. #15
    aka Phil Jungels Wanderer's Avatar
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    I've had my Specialized Crosstrail Sport (9spd with a triple) for about 8 years now, and it has been a great bike!

    I've kind of turned it into a roadified utility bike, with Planet Bike fenders, with long mudguards, narrower Schwalbe Marathon Supreme tires (35 and 40mm), rack, various panniers, tail trunk, and various lights. I've also added comfort items like Brooks B-17, Specialized Ergo grips, Specialized P2 Barendz, frame pump, higher rise stem, Shimano PDM 324 dual sided pedals, Cateye Strada w/cadence wired computer. etc.

    It is a fabulous do it all bike, and after about 35,000 miles, it has been almost bulletproof.

    I am anal about maintenance, and probably over do stuff, (but stuff other than brake pads, chains, tires, etc.,) is all doing very well indeed. The only major repair/replacement so far was a new back wheel (36 spoke), and the one on there now is starting to show it's age with some minor cracking at spoke holes. Even the lockout front suspension still works well - without leaks.

    It normally weighs about 250# with me and other junk hung on it, and has carried some too heavy loads from time to time.

    I only hope my Sirrus does as well! (no, I'm not giving up the Crosstrail!)

    I'm very satisfied with this purchase! And, would do it again, but with disk brakes.
    Last edited by Wanderer; 12-05-15 at 08:13 AM.

    "Retirement is the best job I ever had!" Me, 2009


    Specialized Crosstrail Sport - '08
    Nishiki Sport - misappropriated from my youngest son (circa 1984)
    Marin Stinson - misappropriated by my youngest grandson - '01
    "The Beast" - 1990 Schwinn Airdyne (in the basement for winter torture)

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