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Old 11-06-16, 04:59 AM   #1
JasonG1976
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Which Specialized Crosstrail? Help!

Hello.
I am new to this forum and have been reading about hybrids. Went to three bike stores in my area, and found that I like the Crosstrail best of all.

But, like everything else, there are choices within choices.

I want to upgrade from the base level, but each upgrade comes with an increased price. I am trying to decide between the disc and the more expensive sport. Are the difference in the components worth the increase in price? Will I feel the difference in the ride, and or will some components last longer than others?

Any opinion you can offer will be considered.

Thank you.

Jason
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Old 11-06-16, 06:42 AM   #2
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Welcome to the forum.
Now that you have narrowed down to what bike brand and style you like , ask yourself these things.
Do you like to ride or love to ride?
Are you younger , stronger , more likely to ride rough trails or smooth clean trails?
As you go up the ladder of models of crosstrail , the component sets get more durable , better shifting , smoother and longer lasting.
The front fork action gets better as you go up also.
Here's what I've found for myself for comparison.
I'm an old guy , pretty light 160lbs , arthritic not particularly the pillar of health.
My Giant Roam is a non disc model similar to the base crosstrail.
If I had to buy again , I would go for disc brakes , the rest of the bike thrills me every ride.
The cheaper forks on the base model bikes are not super durable or made for large really fit riders.
For me , it's fine.
I don't ride rough trails or nasty off road stuff ever.
I like to ride more than I thought I would , I enjoy it more each week , I'm going to try to wear my bike out.
Knowing what I know now , I would stretch my wallet to the next model up if I did it again.
The dual sport bikes like these are very comfortable and durable for general riding.
Pride of ownership aside , nearly all with serve you well , but more is better if you're bigger , younger , or stronger.
Maintenance is a big thing , properly maintained , a friendly dealer , all these things will make a huge difference in your riding.
Hope this helps .
Mick
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Old 11-06-16, 09:09 AM   #3
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Hello.
Are the difference in the components worth the increase in price? Will I feel the difference in the ride, and or will some components last longer than others?
Yes, but subjective. You would probably get significantly more enjoyment out of the lighter frame models, along with the components that come with those models. 2 chain rings vs 3 make a significant improvement. But worth is subjective. The best advice would be to ride all the variations you can.

You will likely not notice much ride differences unless you transverse rough terrain.

I found the higher end components rarely need adjustment.

Definitely disk brakes, but there is a different feel to each variation, you may love one over another.

So test ride as many different components as you can to see if any of them make any difference in feel. Don't worry about durability, just what feels best to you. Higher end components typically shift smoother and have more convenience features, but buy the least money one with the component you likes.

Last edited by ColdCase; 11-06-16 at 09:13 AM.
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Old 11-06-16, 06:24 PM   #4
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Whichever you decide, I would hope you would get back to us and let us know how you like the brain suspension fork. I'm assuming you are going after the 2017 models. I've been curious on how it works on hybrid bikes.

I agree with ColdCase, you need to go ride! I have a 2015 Crosstrail Sport and I really like the Hydro disc brakes and the Alivio setup. But I find having the granny gear a total waste of space and would have preferred the gearing the current Sport has. I've tested the granny gear twice after buying the bike and never used it since. So depending how and where you will ride, you may not need this. But then again, if you are only going riding occasionally, then you may not need the Sport.

Are you planning on riding gravel trails? How long of rides are you planning for the short term and long term? I'm not so asking for myself as trying to give you suggestions on what you need to ask yourself when looking at the different bikes.

Happy Shopping!
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Old 11-06-16, 07:37 PM   #5
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travbikeman,

Sorry, but what do you mean by "GRANNY GEAR"?

If I can be more specific , I am 40 years old and weigh 175. I am looking for 10-20 miles rides on paved and maybe dirt trails. Not any kind of mountain bike.

I have $1000 to spend on a hybrid. If not the Specialized Cross Trail, then what else do you recommend?

Thank you.

Jason
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Old 11-06-16, 08:25 PM   #6
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travbikeman,

Sorry, but what do you mean by "GRANNY GEAR"?

If I can be more specific , I am 40 years old and weigh 175. I am looking for 10-20 miles rides on paved and maybe dirt trails. Not any kind of mountain bike.

I have $1000 to spend on a hybrid. If not the Specialized Cross Trail, then what else do you recommend?

Thank you.

Jason
It is the small of 3 chain rings on the triple cranks. Its good for going up real steep hills, but useless if you don't go up these kind of hills.

10 to 20 miles can be done with any of these crosstrails. Best idea is to test ride to find what you like.

My personal opinion is the sport is the best bang for the buck on the Crosstrails. But, there are other equally good bikes for less money from Giant, GT, Fuji and others.
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Old 11-06-16, 09:18 PM   #7
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travbikeman,

Sorry, but what do you mean by "GRANNY GEAR"?

If I can be more specific , I am 40 years old and weigh 175. I am looking for 10-20 miles rides on paved and maybe dirt trails. Not any kind of mountain bike.

I have $1000 to spend on a hybrid. If not the Specialized Cross Trail, then what else do you recommend?

Thank you.

Jason

In the Specialized range, as travbikeman mentioned, the 2017 Sport version looks quite compelling.


Giant has two contenders in the Roam 1 and Toughroad SLR 2


https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/roam-1


https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/toughroad-slr-2


Trek has the DS3


DS 3 | Trek Bikes




I was in a similar position to you and I went with the Giant Toughroad SLR 2 and have been very happy with it.


Due to having a carbon fork(obviously a tougher version than what one would find on a road bike) and being made from Giant's highest grade of aluminium, the Toughroad will be 4lbs lighter than it's suspension forked rivals at similar price points.


This below video is what I like to point to in order to show what sort of riding the Toughroad is well suited to.


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Old 11-07-16, 06:08 AM   #8
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ColonelSanders,

Saw the video, and looked at your suggestion. Thanks. Assume that most of my riding will be on paved roads. Would you still go with the Giant over the Spec. Sport?

Giant is not easy to find where I live, but I will check it out.

Thanks.
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Old 11-07-16, 06:20 AM   #9
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ColonelSanders,

Saw the video, and looked at your suggestion. Thanks. Assume that most of my riding will be on paved roads. Would you still go with the Giant over the Spec. Sport?

Giant is not easy to find where I live, but I will check it out.

Thanks.
Unless you have a bad back or neck, then the suspension fork may not be the best option, especially when compared to a mountain bike style carbon fork.

Before the Toughroad came out approx 18+months ago, I was set on getting either a Trek 8.6DS or a Crosstrail Expert, as I saw something like a Sirrus or FX as being not rugged enough for my usage.

What swayed me to the Toughroad and its carbon fork, is besides the bike being 4 lbs lighter(obviously not all the weight savings is due to the rigid carbon fork), is that I would never need to worry about servicing the suspension fork.

Now I don't know how often a suspension fork is supposed to be serviced, but that is a level of cost and complication I didn't want.
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Old 11-07-16, 08:48 AM   #10
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I have $1000 to spend on a hybrid. If not the Specialized Cross Trail, then what else do you recommend?

Thank you.

Jason
The Trek DS4 is close to your budget and has suspension fork with remote lockout and decent components. I really liked the one I test rode and ordered it.
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Old 11-07-16, 10:24 AM   #11
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ColonelSanders,

Saw the video, and looked at your suggestion. Thanks. Assume that most of my riding will be on paved roads. Would you still go with the Giant over the Spec. Sport?

Giant is not easy to find where I live, but I will check it out.

Thanks.
If you're gonna mostly be on paved roads and trails, wouldn't the Sirrus be a better option than the Cross Trail?
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Old 11-07-16, 10:29 AM   #12
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If you're gonna mostly be on paved roads and trails, wouldn't the Sirrus be a better option than the Cross Trail?
I agree. I think the Sirrus would suit you better, unless your "dirt trails" are rough. The Sirrus comes with 30mm tires, so it should be able to handle light dirt trails.
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Old 11-07-16, 10:47 AM   #13
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I agree. I think the Sirrus would suit you better, unless your "dirt trails" are rough. The Sirrus comes with 30mm tires, so it should be able to handle light dirt trails.
This may be simplistic and not 100% accurate, but my understanding of Specializedís hybrid line is that they make two Ė the CrossTrail which is for people who plan to ride mostly on dirt and trails, and the Sirrus which is for people who will ride mostly on paved roads. Either one can handle both types of surfaces, but you need to take a good hard look at how and where you plan to do your riding in order to know which one will be best for you. I have a Sirrus Sport Disc (2016) that I ride 95% on paved surfaces and itís awesome. And when I do go offroad, or on light trails, or over curbs through potholes and bumps, etc., it handles that stuff just fine too.
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Old 11-07-16, 12:10 PM   #14
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I am looking for 10-20 miles rides on paved and maybe dirt trails. Not any kind of mountain bike.

I have $1000 to spend on a hybrid. If not the Specialized Cross Trail, then what else do you recommend?

Thank you.

Jason
Giant Toughroad. The shock on the Specialized Crosstrail is useless extra weight.
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Old 11-07-16, 12:13 PM   #15
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If you're gonna mostly be on paved roads and trails, wouldn't the Sirrus be a better option than the Cross Trail?
No. Sirrus is just a road bike with flat bars. The tires are too narrow for any serious length of riding on dirt trails. While it can be done, it's not comfortable.
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Old 11-07-16, 12:13 PM   #16
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Guys,

Thanks. I have read all that you have written , and just to drive myself nuts, I went to look at the specs for the Sport Sirrus and Cross Trail.

And, I have no idea what the difference in the components mean....and if any one of the components are of a higher quality than any of the ones in the other bike.

Who knows about this stuff?

Confused, but moving forward.

Jason
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Old 11-07-16, 12:38 PM   #17
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Guys,

Thanks. I have read all that you have written , and just to drive myself nuts, I went to look at the specs for the Sport Sirrus and Cross Trail.

And, I have no idea what the difference in the components mean....and if any one of the components are of a higher quality than any of the ones in the other bike.

Who knows about this stuff?

Confused, but moving forward.

Jason
Biggest difference between the Crosstrail Sport and the Sirrus Sport, would be the fork, one has suspension and the other has a carbon fiber fork(which I know, it was obvious). The other big difference is really geometry. This is where you need to test ride the bikes to find what fits you well. You may end up testing both of these and can't stand it because it doesn't fit you. Where as other bikes might fit you better. Tire size, pedals and other things like that are easily changeable to meet your needs on both bikes.

You stated that you will do mostly pavement riding. I would suggest the Sirrus or other brands without the suspension then. I got the suspension mainly because I ride alot on paths like the Chesapeake and Ohio canal that I feel the suspension works...ok. The suspension does add weight, which does lessen the feeling you have when riding. It doesn't have any maintenance, or at least my LBS is telling me so. If it does, mine is going to die a horrible death then the way I've been riding it the last two years.

Last edited by travbikeman; 11-07-16 at 12:42 PM.
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Old 11-07-16, 12:44 PM   #18
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This may be simplistic and not 100% accurate, but my understanding of Specialized’s hybrid line is that they make two – the CrossTrail which is for people who plan to ride mostly on dirt and trails, and the Sirrus which is for people who will ride mostly on paved roads. Either one can handle both types of surfaces, but you need to take a good hard look at how and where you plan to do your riding in order to know which one will be best for you. I have a Sirrus Sport Disc (2016) that I ride 95% on paved surfaces and it’s awesome. And when I do go offroad, or on light trails, or over curbs through potholes and bumps, etc., it handles that stuff just fine too.
The CrossTrail is a mountain bike oriented hybrid bike. The Sirrus is a road bike oriented hybrid bike. Both are still hybrid bikes which should be able to handle dirt trails. OP hasn't specifically stated what kind of dirt trails he is going to ride on and for how long. So at this point, either bike will work for him. But if he rides 90% paved roads, he will have more fun with a Sirrus just like you.

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No. Sirrus is just a road bike with flat bars. The tires are too narrow for any serious length of riding on dirt trails. While it can be done, it's not comfortable.
I don't think the 30mm are too narrow for "light" dirt trails. I mean the Domanes can be ridden on light dirt trails and they have 28mm tires. I agree with you on the comfort statement. Depending on how long OP will ride on the dirt trails, it will not be as comfortable on Sirrus as it will be on the CrossTrail.

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Guys,

Thanks. I have read all that you have written , and just to drive myself nuts, I went to look at the specs for the Sport Sirrus and Cross Trail.

And, I have no idea what the difference in the components mean....and if any one of the components are of a higher quality than any of the ones in the other bike.

Who knows about this stuff?

Confused, but moving forward.

Jason
What kind of dirt trails are you going to ride in? And how much of your ride will be spent on dirt trails?

Here is the Shimano MTB groupset hierarchy:
https://www.evanscycles.com/coffeest...heir-hierarchy

Here is the Shimano road bike groupset hierarchy:
https://www.evanscycles.com/coffeest...heir-hierarchy

You mention a $1000 budget. If so, I would look at the Specialized CrossTrail Elite or Sirrus Elite. If you are going to ride mostly paved roads, you will have more fun in the Sirrus. If you are undecided, the CrossTrail with the suspension lockout should be a good choice.
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Old 11-07-16, 04:25 PM   #19
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My opinion, always buy the best bike you can afford! Nobody is ever sorry they bought the best, but buyers remorse often follows cheaping out.

Buy the best Crosstrail you can afford, with disc brakes. You won't be sorry, as it's a great do it all bike.

Again, MHO
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Old 11-08-16, 04:35 AM   #20
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I have been reading poor reviews about the components of the Cross Trail. Some have called it poorly made as it does not hold up.

So I am looking at the Giant ToughRoad SLR 2, and will compare the ride.

I guess at some point I will have to stop reading and testing, and just make a decision.

It is amazing how complicated buying just about anything gets, from cars to refrigerators, to computers, et al...JUST TOO MANY CHOICES!!!

Thanks guys
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Old 11-08-16, 09:48 AM   #21
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I have been reading poor reviews about the components of the Cross Trail. Some have called it poorly made as it does not hold up.

So I am looking at the Giant ToughRoad SLR 2, and will compare the ride.

I guess at some point I will have to stop reading and testing, and just make a decision.

It is amazing how complicated buying just about anything gets, from cars to refrigerators, to computers, et al...JUST TOO MANY CHOICES!!!

Thanks guys
Yea, I have to admit, I have had to replace many parts. But I'm rather abusive with My Crosstrail Sport. It's gone through streams higher than the bottom bracket, lots of mud, dust, wet leaves getting into the drive train and have taken it over rock piles larger than what the wheels could have handled. Plus it doesn't help that I'm a clyde and it has had to take my heavy weight. I was nearly 380lbs when I first got it 2 years ago (now down to 290lbs). Frame has so far taken my weight, even the seat post hasn't complained. Oh and the cheaper suspension and yes it's cheaper has only bottomed out on my twice since buying it. I'm considering getting a better shock if I don't replace the bike with a RockShox Paragrim.

2 years and nearly 1800 miles later, I have had to replace the chain and bottom bracket that was a real mess when I had around 800 miles on it and replaced with higher quality components. Wheels that couldn't handle the small rocks that I went over on a side of a trail earlier this year, which they weren't supposed to anyways and replaced the cheap plastic pedals that you generally find on all bikes. Other parts I replaced were more for fit, like the seat, grips and handlebar stem to give me a more comfortable ride. The derailleurs, granted had to have them adjusted a number of times have taken my abuse. Am actually surprised the Alivio has done this well. Was thinking I would have had to change the rear derailleur out by now with a Deore.

But from your description of riding 10-20 miles mostly pavement. I'm doubting if you would have any of the issues that I've had. I believe I've abused the Crosstrail as much if not more than others on this site. But welcome being told no that I haven't.

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Old 11-08-16, 10:14 AM   #22
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Admittedly, my Crosstrail Sport is 8 years old, and does have over 35,000 miles on it. But it has been a real workhorse.

Right now, my Grandson rides it more than I do, because he can't find many comfortable bikes for his 6'7" body - and the Crosstrail in XL works really well for him. I spend more time on my Sirrus, just so I don't have to readjust stuff to his tallness!

It spends almost all of it's life on pavement in one form or another. I weigh 200#, my Grandson around 150. It carries groceries, and other stuff on a regular basis.

I am absolutely anal about keeping it clean and properly lubed. The only parts I have replaced are tires every year, and brake pads a few times. All of the original running gear are still on the bike, and work as well as new. (even the cassette). The fork still works well, and still does not leak. The rear wheel was replaced in the first month, as it kept breaking spokes. No problem since then. I am starting to see some minor cracks in the aluminum rims at the spoke holes, so I am watching them - so far, so good. At 35,000 I guess that is to be expected.

I do have three chains for it, and they get rotated about every month, during a thorough cleaning and lubrication.

If I had to make a choice on keeping only one, it would be the Crosstrail - because it is so versatile. It is a workhorse, that likes to go fast.

As far as not holding up, that has not been my experience! It has been a great bike. It is starting to show a little age, but it deserves the look!

MY only regret, is NOT buying disc brakes when it was new!

Would I buy another one - you bet I would. But I would spend more, and get everything I want, including hydraulic disc brakes.

Last edited by Wanderer; 12-02-16 at 03:06 PM.
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Old 11-08-16, 02:09 PM   #23
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Admittedly, my Crosstrail Sport is 8 years old, and does have over 35,000 miles on it. But it has been a real workhorse.


Would I buy another one - you bet I would. But I would spend more, and get everything I want, including hydraulic disc brakes.
Wow! That is over 4300 miles a year. That's impressive!

I too agree with wanting to spend more. I kind of wish I had gotten a Crosstrail with the E5 Premium alum and better components myself. Along with the next size up. I feel as if I bought one size too small for me.
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Old 11-08-16, 02:31 PM   #24
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Yeah, that's when I was younger, and trying to do at least 1,000 every month (Mar thru Nov - 30-40 miles every day) --- then I got older and slowed down by heart problems a couple years back.

Now, at 70, I still ride. Just not as far or as hard! Darn it! Cardiac drugs really slow you down!

Sucks to get old!
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Old 11-29-16, 03:51 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by travbikeman View Post
I got the suspension mainly because I ride alot on paths like the Chesapeake and Ohio canal that I feel the suspension works...ok. The suspension does add weight, which does lessen the feeling you have when riding. It doesn't have any maintenance, or at least my LBS is telling me so. If it does, mine is going to die a horrible death then the way I've been riding it the last two years.
I rode the length of the C&O with a group this last June and felt that my CrossTrail was the perfect bike for it. That trail is pretty rough in spots and a couple of riders who were on more road-oriented, non-suspension bikes (Trek CrossRip and a road-going tandem) were pretty beat up at the end of the longer days, and were also sliding around a lot in the muddy sections. The CrossTrail with suspension and 700x38 Trigger tires went through it all with flying colors.

It also does well as a "gravel bike." We have 100s of miles of dirt & gravel miles in my area, but some of them get pretty washboarded and potholed between gradings, so again a bike with suspension is a big plus.

IMO, weight is not a big factor for me on a bike like this since I'm often toting stuff in a trunk bag and am not going for speed or style points.

Last edited by DougG; 11-29-16 at 03:56 PM.
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