Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Hybrid Bicycles Where else would you go to discuss these fun, versatile bikes?

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 05-03-17, 11:40 AM   #1
cycling705
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: USA
Bikes: Specialized Sirrus Sport
Posts: 143
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
Opinion: Specialized Crossroads vs. Giant Roam 3

I own a Specialized Sirrus Sport, but I'm looking to buy a 2nd bike that would be used for family rides (wife & 5 y/o) around our local neighborhoods and paved bike paths.

After research and several test rides, I've narrowed my selection down to the Specialized Crossroads (base model) and the Giant Roam 3.

Although both are $440, if I go with the Roam, I'll add an adjustable stem to make it more of a comfort ride.

Questions:
1. Since the Crossroads already comes with an adjustable stem, is the additional $50 (stem purchase) for the Giant Roam worth it, or are the suspension fork (with lockout) and disc brakes unnecessary for casual riding?

2. Which bike would you buy in light of my needs?

Specs:
Specialized Crossroads: https://www.specialized.com/us/en/bi...ssroads/118542
Giant Roam 3: https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/roam-3

Thanks in advance for your opinions and suggestions.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg specialized_crossroads_2017.jpg (78.7 KB, 288 views)
File Type: jpg giant_roam3_2017.jpg (74.1 KB, 289 views)

Last edited by cycling705; 05-03-17 at 01:00 PM.
cycling705 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-17, 11:56 AM   #2
therealjoeblow
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Bikes: 2015 Giant Roam 1 | 2002 Giant Sedona LX | 1980s Norco Monterey SL
Posts: 275
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 130 Post(s)
The geometry of the Giant Cypress DX (700c wheels) or Giant Sedona DX (26" wheels) compare much more closely to the Crossroads than the Roam does (the Roam compares to the Specialize Crosstrail, not the Crossroad, and is a different style of bike):

https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/cypress-dx

https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/sedona-dx

Both already have the adjustable stem, are lower cost, and better equipped than the Crossroads (rear derailleur is the drive train component that matters most, both of the Giants have Altus RD's, which is one grade better in the lineup than the Tourney (bottom of the line) on the Crossroads.

As far as the suspension debate - I'm not going to even start on that battle again. Decide for yourself if you WANT it, no-one can tell you if you NEED it, and the opinions will be way too diverse to be of any help.
therealjoeblow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-17, 12:10 PM   #3
therealjoeblow
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Bikes: 2015 Giant Roam 1 | 2002 Giant Sedona LX | 1980s Norco Monterey SL
Posts: 275
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 130 Post(s)
BTW, you posted 3 messages with the same content and variations of the title

Specialized Crossroads vs. Giant Roam 3

Opinion: Specialized Crossroads vs. Giant Roam 3

Poll Opinion: Specialized Crossroads vs. Giant Roam 3

Since active comment has started here, I would suggest you delete the other 2 before the mods get on to you.
Cheers
TRJB
therealjoeblow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-17, 12:13 PM   #4
finch204
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Bikes: 2013 Trek 4.7 Madone with Flatbars
Posts: 145
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 55 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cycling705 View Post
I own a Specialized Sirrus Sport, but I'm looking to buy a 2nd bike that would be used for family rides (wife & 5 y/o) around our local neighborhoods and paved bike paths.
I know the rule with bikes is n+ 1, but was just curious, why don't you want to use the Sirrus for family rides around the neighborhood?
finch204 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-17, 12:31 PM   #5
cycling705
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: USA
Bikes: Specialized Sirrus Sport
Posts: 143
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by therealjoeblow View Post
BTW, you posted 3 messages with the same content and variations of the title

Specialized Crossroads vs. Giant Roam 3

Opinion: Specialized Crossroads vs. Giant Roam 3

Poll Opinion: Specialized Crossroads vs. Giant Roam 3

Since active comment has started here, I would suggest you delete the other 2 before the mods get on to you.
Cheers
TRJB
Sorry about that - it was honest mistake. Thanks for the note. I had the moderators remove the other two posts.

Last edited by cycling705; 05-09-17 at 01:53 PM.
cycling705 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-17, 12:55 PM   #6
cycling705
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: USA
Bikes: Specialized Sirrus Sport
Posts: 143
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by finch204 View Post
I know the rule with bikes is n+ 1, but was just curious, why don't you want to use the Sirrus for family rides around the neighborhood?
Fair question. The Sirrus is too aggressive and uncomfortable for leisure rides at 5 MPH.
cycling705 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-17, 12:57 PM   #7
AU Tiger
Senior Member
 
AU Tiger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: central Pennsylvania
Bikes: 2014 Fuji Absolute 1.5, 2017 Kona Fire Mountain
Posts: 296
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 56 Post(s)
Last year when I wanted to add a second bike for trails which were rougher than what my hybrid could handle, I was originally looking at the Roam. But then I decided that if I was going to get a bike with a suspension fork, I might as well get a mountain bike. The reason is that the suspensions on them tend to be better quality. And I'm not talking about a high-end air shock. I'm just talking about beefier stanchions and the ability to adjust rebound and damping. So I ended up with a Kona Fire Mountain. It's a good bike for trails with lots of roots and bumps. But because it's so heavy, I still use the hybrid for typical rail trails and that type of thing.
AU Tiger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-17, 12:59 PM   #8
cycling705
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: USA
Bikes: Specialized Sirrus Sport
Posts: 143
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by therealjoeblow View Post
The geometry of the Giant Cypress DX (700c wheels) or Giant Sedona DX (26" wheels) compare much more closely to the Crossroads than the Roam does (the Roam compares to the Specialize Crosstrail, not the Crossroad, and is a different style of bike):

https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/cypress-dx

https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/sedona-dx

Both already have the adjustable stem, are lower cost, and better equipped than the Crossroads (rear derailleur is the drive train component that matters most, both of the Giants have Altus RD's, which is one grade better in the lineup than the Tourney (bottom of the line) on the Crossroads.

As far as the suspension debate - I'm not going to even start on that battle again. Decide for yourself if you WANT it, no-one can tell you if you NEED it, and the opinions will be way too diverse to be of any help.
I agree with you. However, I don't believe the Cypress DX has a lockout capability on the suspension fork. As for the Sedona, it's just a personal lack of preference. Thanks for the info. Much appreciated.

Last edited by cycling705; 05-03-17 at 02:03 PM.
cycling705 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-17, 02:01 PM   #9
finch204
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Bikes: 2013 Trek 4.7 Madone with Flatbars
Posts: 145
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 55 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cycling705 View Post
Fair question. The Sirrus is too aggressive and uncomfortable for leisure rides at 5 MPH.
Understood.
finch204 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-17, 02:19 PM   #10
cycling705
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: USA
Bikes: Specialized Sirrus Sport
Posts: 143
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by finch204 View Post
I know the rule with bikes is n+ 1, but was just curious, why don't you want to use the Sirrus for family rides around the neighborhood?
Quote:
Originally Posted by cycling705 View Post
Fair question. The Sirrus is too aggressive and uncomfortable for leisure rides at 5 MPH.
Quote:
Originally Posted by finch204 View Post
Understood.
By the way, my wife asked the same question. I'm not sure my response to her (the same one I gave you) was as well received.

Last edited by cycling705; 05-03-17 at 02:26 PM.
cycling705 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-17, 02:22 PM   #11
cycling705
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: USA
Bikes: Specialized Sirrus Sport
Posts: 143
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by AU Tiger View Post
Last year when I wanted to add a second bike for trails which were rougher than what my hybrid could handle, I was originally looking at the Roam. But then I decided that if I was going to get a bike with a suspension fork, I might as well get a mountain bike. The reason is that the suspensions on them tend to be better quality. And I'm not talking about a high-end air shock. I'm just talking about beefier stanchions and the ability to adjust rebound and damping. So I ended up with a Kona Fire Mountain. It's a good bike for trails with lots of roots and bumps. But because it's so heavy, I still use the hybrid for typical rail trails and that type of thing.
Thanks for your feedback - interesting and helpful.
cycling705 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-17, 04:07 PM   #12
therealjoeblow
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Bikes: 2015 Giant Roam 1 | 2002 Giant Sedona LX | 1980s Norco Monterey SL
Posts: 275
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 130 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cycling705 View Post
I agree with you. However, I don't believe the Cypress DX has a lockout capability on the suspension fork. As for the Sedona, it's just a personal lack of preference. Thanks for the info. Much appreciated.

Ah, ok, then good reasoning to look at the Roam 3.

In that case, my opinion would be that the Roam 3 with an adjustable stem is a better bike between your two original choices. It has Acera RD which is 2 grades better than Tourney, disc brakes (mechanical) which are arguably better than rim brakes, threadless headset instead of quill, 8 speed trigger shifters vs 7 speed revo-grip shifters (possibly personal preference, but I think the revo grip shifters are bottom of the barrel, if I was going grip, I would use SRAM GripShift, they are at least reliable with some longevity), better cassette (altus vs tourney freewheel), etc...

Also, you can definitely close the price gap on the adjustable stem. Here in Canada, Mountain Equipment Coop sells a very high quality self-branded adjustable alloy stem for $23CDN which is $17.25USD - you definitely do not need to spend $50USD on that!

https://www.mec.ca/en/product/5021-1...djustable-Stem

Cheers
TRJB
therealjoeblow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-17, 04:09 PM   #13
dbf909
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: South Florida
Bikes: '79 Schwinn LeTour IV, '11 Giant Roam1, '17 Giant Roam3, '15 Giant Defy1, '17 Jamis Earth Cruiser1 (x2)
Posts: 44
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
I have a couple of Roams and only have positive experience - they are great bikes. As previously noted, the two bikes that you are comparing are fairly different. The Giant model that is a closer comparison to the Sirrus is the Escape - basically a Roam without the suspension fork or disc brakes.

I think that if you compare the Sirrus with the Escape, at the same groupset level, the Giant will be less $.

I love the Roam and take advantage of the front suspension in the riding that I do. It works well for me. However, if you are just looking for something for 5 mph family cruise rides, especially on trails or MUPs, the Escape would be a better option. It's a bit lighter and can be had for less $.

Last edited by dbf909; 05-03-17 at 04:13 PM.
dbf909 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-04-17, 08:37 AM   #14
finch204
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Bikes: 2013 Trek 4.7 Madone with Flatbars
Posts: 145
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 55 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cycling705 View Post
By the way, my wife asked the same question. I'm not sure my response to her (the same one I gave you) was as well received.
Haha. My wife was the same way when I bought my first bike and wanted to get another one. After I have gone from a Verve to a Madone to a flat bar Madone, and she has gone from a Verve to a FX, she seems to have understood now that certain bikes are better suited for different kind of rides.

While I understand this is the hybrid bicycles section, I would just like to point out that if you're really looking at 5 mph family rides, you might want to consider a cruiser bike as well. The Electra Cruiser Lux 7D Fat Tire bike looks like a fun bike for family rides.
finch204 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-04-17, 12:54 PM   #15
prj71
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Bikes:
Posts: 765
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 399 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by AU Tiger View Post
But then I decided that if I was going to get a bike with a suspension fork, I might as well get a mountain bike. The reason is that the suspensions on them tend to be better quality. And I'm not talking about a high-end air shock. I'm just talking about beefier stanchions and the ability to adjust rebound and damping.
Someone gets it.
prj71 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-17, 10:47 AM   #16
cycling705
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: USA
Bikes: Specialized Sirrus Sport
Posts: 143
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by therealjoeblow View Post
Ah, ok, then good reasoning to look at the Roam 3.

In that case, my opinion would be that the Roam 3 with an adjustable stem is a better bike between your two original choices. It has Acera RD which is 2 grades better than Tourney, disc brakes (mechanical) which are arguably better than rim brakes, threadless headset instead of quill, 8 speed trigger shifters vs 7 speed revo-grip shifters (possibly personal preference, but I think the revo grip shifters are bottom of the barrel, if I was going grip, I would use SRAM GripShift, they are at least reliable with some longevity), better cassette (altus vs tourney freewheel), etc...

Also, you can definitely close the price gap on the adjustable stem. Here in Canada, Mountain Equipment Coop sells a very high quality self-branded adjustable alloy stem for $23CDN which is $17.25USD - you definitely do not need to spend $50USD on that!

https://www.mec.ca/en/product/5021-1...djustable-Stem

Cheers
TRJB
Thank you. Very helpful. I'm kind of a novice in this area - will the change in stem type cause any problems with how the bike handles? In other words, are adjustable stems OK for the type of geometry found on the Roam 3?
cycling705 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-17, 10:50 AM   #17
cycling705
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: USA
Bikes: Specialized Sirrus Sport
Posts: 143
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbf909 View Post
I have a couple of Roams and only have positive experience - they are great bikes. As previously noted, the two bikes that you are comparing are fairly different. The Giant model that is a closer comparison to the Sirrus is the Escape - basically a Roam without the suspension fork or disc brakes.

I think that if you compare the Sirrus with the Escape, at the same groupset level, the Giant will be less $.

I love the Roam and take advantage of the front suspension in the riding that I do. It works well for me. However, if you are just looking for something for 5 mph family cruise rides, especially on trails or MUPs, the Escape would be a better option. It's a bit lighter and can be had for less $.
Thank you. What do you use your Roam for? If I'm only going to be riding in neighborhoods and paved bike paths, is the suspension feature over-kill?
cycling705 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-17, 01:25 PM   #18
AU Tiger
Senior Member
 
AU Tiger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: central Pennsylvania
Bikes: 2014 Fuji Absolute 1.5, 2017 Kona Fire Mountain
Posts: 296
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 56 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cycling705 View Post
If I'm only going to be riding in neighborhoods and paved bike paths, is the suspension feature over-kill?
I'll answer based on my MTB with front suspension. Yes, for neighborhoods and paved paths, the front suspension is overkill... unless, of course, there is some physical condition that necessitates it. Especially with the nice wide 45mm tires that are on the Specialized Crossroads - those will go a long way in smoothing out the ride. Plus, the Crossroads has a much less aggressive geometry compared to the Roam, which is something you said you wanted. So of the two you mentioned here, I think the Crossroads is better in two ways: lighter and more relaxed.
AU Tiger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-17, 01:56 PM   #19
cycling705
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: USA
Bikes: Specialized Sirrus Sport
Posts: 143
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by AU Tiger View Post
I'll answer based on my MTB with front suspension. Yes, for neighborhoods and paved paths, the front suspension is overkill... unless, of course, there is some physical condition that necessitates it. Especially with the nice wide 45mm tires that are on the Specialized Crossroads - those will go a long way in smoothing out the ride. Plus, the Crossroads has a much less aggressive geometry compared to the Roam, which is something you said you wanted. So of the two you mentioned here, I think the Crossroads is better in two ways: lighter and more relaxed.
Great points. Is it fair to say the Roam is better suited for gravel and mostly smooth dirt paths, and occasional paved paths (which is where the lockout feature comes into play on the fork)? Thanks for your input.

Last edited by cycling705; 05-05-17 at 01:59 PM.
cycling705 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-17, 02:26 PM   #20
dbf909
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: South Florida
Bikes: '79 Schwinn LeTour IV, '11 Giant Roam1, '17 Giant Roam3, '15 Giant Defy1, '17 Jamis Earth Cruiser1 (x2)
Posts: 44
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cycling705 View Post
Thank you. What do you use your Roam for? If I'm only going to be riding in neighborhoods and paved bike paths, is the suspension feature over-kill?
I ride the Roam(s) mainly on Levy roads out in the Everglades. No hills at all but a fair amount of wind. The roads are primarily two-track and rough weathered unmaintained gravel and rock - no pavement. I have ridden some pavement with the Roam early on (the fork lockout works well for that) but now these bikes are rendered for levy and canal path riding only since I have other bikes for pavement.

Given that these levy and canal roads are are pretty rough, the front suspension is very effective in making it quite a bit more comfortable on my hands, arms and shoulders. I am a big fan of the suspension fork although I wouldn't do real technical mountain bike trails with it. As most will say it is pretty inadequate for that. We have some great/difficult mountain bike trails at a public park near me - some of the best in the state. I wouldn't take the Roam out there though. However, for the trails that I ride (there are hundreds of mile of them around where I live), the Suntour NEX fork works very well.

All of that said, If you plan to ride only on pavement (bike paths and neighborhoods), the suspension fork is largely unnecessary. It does add weight and a bit of cost as well. I would spend that $ on a bike with a carbon fork and a better groupset if I were in your shoes. Those models will likely come with more pavement appropriate tires as well.

Last edited by dbf909; 05-05-17 at 02:31 PM.
dbf909 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-17, 02:38 PM   #21
cycling705
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: USA
Bikes: Specialized Sirrus Sport
Posts: 143
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbf909 View Post
I ride the Roam(s) mainly on Levy roads out in the Everglades. No hills at all but a fair amount of wind. The roads are primarily two-track and rough weathered unmaintained gravel and rock - no pavement. I have ridden some pavement with the Roam early on (the fork lockout works well for that) but now these bikes are rendered for levy and canal path riding only since I have other bikes for pavement.

Given that these levy and canal roads are are pretty rough, the front suspension is very effective in making it quite a bit more comfortable on my hands, arms and shoulders. I am a big fan of the suspension fork although I wouldn't do real technical mountain bike trails with it. As most will say it is pretty inadequate for that. We have some great/difficult mountain bike trails at a public park near me - some of the best in the state. I wouldn't take the Roam out there though. However, for the trails that I ride (there are hundreds of mile of them around where I live), the Suntour NEX fork works very well.

All of that said, If you plan to ride only on pavement (bike paths and neighborhoods), the suspension fork is largely unnecessary. It does add weight and a bit of cost as well. I would spend that $ on a bike with a carbon fork and a better groupset if I were in your shoes. Those models will likely come with more pavement appropriate tires as well.
Very helpful. Thank you much.
cycling705 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-17, 04:00 PM   #22
AU Tiger
Senior Member
 
AU Tiger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: central Pennsylvania
Bikes: 2014 Fuji Absolute 1.5, 2017 Kona Fire Mountain
Posts: 296
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 56 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cycling705 View Post
Is it fair to say the Roam is better suited for gravel and mostly smooth dirt paths, and occasional paved paths (which is where the lockout feature comes into play on the fork)? Thanks for your input.
Yeah, that's probably accurate.

Have you considered the Specialized Roll? That line looks to have some nice options for leisurely riding like you've described. And they have 2.3" MTB tires which in my opinion would do more for smoothing out rides than the fork on the Roam would, even on bumpy gravel. And unlike the Crossroads, the Roll has thumb shifters instead of grip shifters - those grips shifters would be a deal-breaker for me, but you may not mind them.
AU Tiger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-17, 04:01 PM   #23
andrei_r
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Montreal, Canada/ Brasilia, Brazil (currently)
Bikes: Giant FCR 3 with lots of mods, Brazilian made Caloi 100.
Posts: 263
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 61 Post(s)
Adjustable stem

There was some talk about the adjustable stem, but if I understood you were considering putting it on the Roam. Why not just slap one on your Sirrus? Keep it down for your usual riding and raise it for the rides with the family. Save a lot of money and garage space in the process and get some extra points with the wifey.
andrei_r is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-17, 01:55 PM   #24
cycling705
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: USA
Bikes: Specialized Sirrus Sport
Posts: 143
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by AU Tiger View Post
Have you considered the Specialized Roll? That line looks to have some nice options for leisurely riding like you've described. And they have 2.3" MTB tires which in my opinion would do more for smoothing out rides than the fork on the Roam would, even on bumpy gravel. And unlike the Crossroads, the Roll has thumb shifters instead of grip shifters - those grips shifters would be a deal-breaker for me, but you may not mind them.
Quote:
Originally Posted by andrei_r View Post
There was some talk about the adjustable stem, but if I understood you were considering putting it on the Roam. Why not just slap one on your Sirrus? Keep it down for your usual riding and raise it for the rides with the family. Save a lot of money and garage space in the process and get some extra points with the wifey.
Thank you both.

I did consider the Specialized Roll, as well as the adjustable stem on the Sirrus. The Roll just seems to be too casual for what I need. The adjustable stem would have been an option on the Sirrus but the chain stays won't allow for much more than 32-35c on the tires. (I'm wanting 38-45s.)

I agree with AU Tiger from an earlier post - I'm not crazy about the grip-shifters on the Crossroads. Overall, I'm leaning toward the Roam 3 with an adjustable stem. My LBS said if I plan to ride solely on city streets and paved paths, the adjustable stem will be fine on the Roam 3, and it may help soften the ride for any rough streets. Is that a fair assessment?

Thanks again to everyone. This forum is tremendously helpful.
cycling705 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-17, 05:34 PM   #25
AU Tiger
Senior Member
 
AU Tiger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: central Pennsylvania
Bikes: 2014 Fuji Absolute 1.5, 2017 Kona Fire Mountain
Posts: 296
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 56 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cycling705 View Post
Thank you both.

I did consider the Specialized Roll, as well as the adjustable stem on the Sirrus. The Roll just seems to be too casual for what I need. The adjustable stem would have been an option on the Sirrus but the chain stays won't allow for much more than 32-35c on the tires. (I'm wanting 38-45s.)

I agree with AU Tiger from an earlier post - I'm not crazy about the grip-shifters on the Crossroads. Overall, I'm leaning toward the Roam 3 with an adjustable stem. My LBS said if I plan to ride solely on city streets and paved paths, the adjustable stem will be fine on the Roam 3, and it may help soften the ride for any rough streets. Is that a fair assessment?

Thanks again to everyone. This forum is tremendously helpful.
It sounds like you've given it a lot of thought and have some pretty good reasons for going with the Roam. With the adjustable stem and wider tires, I think you'll be happy with it. Giant definitely gives you a lot for your money.
AU Tiger is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:03 PM.


 
  • Ask a Question
    get answers from real people!
Click to start entering your question.
I HAVE A QUESTION