Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    2
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    1st MS 150 Ride Help!

    Hi

    This is my first MS 150 experience this coming October. I want to buy a hybrid bike (since I hear that's the best bike style to ride during that distance.... is that so?). I have a road bike with clips, but since my terrible spill... I haven't rode on it again!!!!!!!!!!

    Okay, so do you have a recommendation for a bike that has good speed and under say $300-400?

    Please let me know. I need to begin riding and preparing. Also, where's a good place to buy this bike? Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
    Velocommuter Commando Sirrus Rider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    My Bikes
    '88 Specialized Sirrus, '89 Alpine Monitor Pass, two '70 Raligh Twenties, '07 Schwinn Town & Country Trike, '07 Specialized Sirrus Hybrid
    Posts
    2,548
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by pfitterchick View Post
    Hi

    This is my first MS 150 experience this coming October. I want to buy a hybrid bike (since I hear that's the best bike style to ride during that distance.... is that so?). I have a road bike with clips, but since my terrible spill... I haven't rode on it again!!!!!!!!!!

    Okay, so do you have a recommendation for a bike that has good speed and under say $300-400?

    Please let me know. I need to begin riding and preparing. Also, where's a good place to buy this bike? Thanks in advance!
    When I rode the MS150 I saw quite a few '01 to '07 Specialized Sirrus'. My recommendation is to look for a used on on Craigslist. A used road/Cross or touring bike would also work well. I rode on my '88 Sirrus (at this vintage it was a racing bike as opposed to flat barred road bike/hybrid) which is the more traditional ride. It worked well, but the 39 year old engine was a little too weak in the hills. I was really wanting a granny gear of a triple.
    Riding 19 Years of Specialized Sirrus Tradition.
    Live in Houston? Come to http://bicyclecommutehouston.blogspot.com/
    1988 Specialized Sirrus, 1989 Alpine Monitor Pass MTB, 2007 Specialized Sirrus 700C hybrid, 2007 Schwinn Town & Country trike, 1970 "Resto-Improved" Raleigh 20, 1970 "WIP" Raleigh 20, and 1980 "WIP" Schwinn Town & Country trike

  3. #3
    Senior Member droobieinop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Orange Park, Florida
    My Bikes
    jamis xenith comp '08, trek 750 hybrid (w/drops) c.1995, centurian fixie, kona cindercone mtb c.2000
    Posts
    846
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Spend your money to reconfigure your road bike.

    I assume that it fits and if there is nothing terminal, then its just a matter of getting comfortable with riding again.

    If you feel too bent over, get a raised stem to bring your hands up.
    If you've been riding with toe clips, get some spd style pedals and shoes.
    If you aren't comfortable with narrow tires, put on something wider. Try some 28s or 32s.

    A hybrid bike with a flat bar will not be comfortable over the type of distance that you will be riding. And you won't want to ride a $400 hybrid for 75 miles.
    "change is the only constant"

  4. #4
    Velocommuter Commando Sirrus Rider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    My Bikes
    '88 Specialized Sirrus, '89 Alpine Monitor Pass, two '70 Raligh Twenties, '07 Schwinn Town & Country Trike, '07 Specialized Sirrus Hybrid
    Posts
    2,548
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by droobieinop View Post
    Spend your money to reconfigure your road bike.

    I assume that it fits and if there is nothing terminal, then its just a matter of getting comfortable with riding again.

    If you feel too bent over, get a raised stem to bring your hands up.
    If you've been riding with toe clips, get some spd style pedals and shoes.
    If you aren't comfortable with narrow tires, put on something wider. Try some 28s or 32s.

    A hybrid bike with a flat bar will not be comfortable over the type of distance that you will be riding. And you won't want to ride a $400 hybrid for 75 miles.

    +1 What I said earlier is just one option, but if you already own a roadbike the more cost effective plan is what droobieinop just said here.
    Riding 19 Years of Specialized Sirrus Tradition.
    Live in Houston? Come to http://bicyclecommutehouston.blogspot.com/
    1988 Specialized Sirrus, 1989 Alpine Monitor Pass MTB, 2007 Specialized Sirrus 700C hybrid, 2007 Schwinn Town & Country trike, 1970 "Resto-Improved" Raleigh 20, 1970 "WIP" Raleigh 20, and 1980 "WIP" Schwinn Town & Country trike

  5. #5
    aka Phil Jungels Wanderer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    North Aurora, IL
    My Bikes
    Road & Hybrid
    Posts
    5,507
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Good Advice, and you already know your own bike.... just change it to suit you.....

  6. #6
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    2
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks to all for the feedback... I will probably for economical reasons, make the transition with my own bike.. Who has money to spend like that these days anyway?

    Thanks to all. I will move forward with your advice. You guys are awesome!

  7. #7
    The Improbable Bulk Little Darwin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Wilkes-Barre, PA
    My Bikes
    Many
    Posts
    7,320
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Just in case someone sees this and doesn't have a road bike to tweak. I disagree about a $400 bike not being suitable for a 75 mile ride. With bar ends, I rode my Sedona for 68 miles in one day, and I weighed over 300 pounds. Someone in a better state of fitness would obviously be able to ride 75 miles in a day. Admittedly, at that time, I was in the best shape I had been in for years due to lots of miles on the bike.

    I just say this because I would hate for someone to miss out on a ride they wanted to do simply because they didn't think they could afford a good enough bike, because someone here said a $400 bike would never do.

    I think a ride like the MS 150 is more suited to a drop bar bike for the aerodynamics and for the various hand positions... but I think it can be done on a lot less bike than some people would propose.

    We are all entitled to our opinions, and this is my opposing view.
    Slow Ride Cyclists of NEPA

    People do not seem to realize that their opinion of the world is also a confession of character.
    - Ralph Waldo Emerson

  8. #8
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    8
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I see this post is old.I want to comment for who reads this thread like I did. ANYONE can ride the MS150. I did my first one here in Florida in 2008. at the time I had a Giant Sedona MTB. I had 26x2.125 wide tires.I was around 280lbs big. I did the 50 miles per day 2day event. It is not a race,you ride at the speed you choose. Do not feel intimidated because you see alot of skinny people with Cervelos ,Orbeas ,LOOK etc. I even saw a few HUFFYS!!! Yes we all know Huffy,LOL. So please anyone feeling compelled to do an event do so.The feeling of acomplishment is great!

  9. #9
    Senior Member The Chemist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Shanghai, China
    My Bikes
    Giant FCR3500
    Posts
    492
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by droobieinop View Post
    A hybrid bike with a flat bar will not be comfortable over the type of distance that you will be riding. And you won't want to ride a $400 hybrid for 75 miles.
    Not true. I have ridden my flat bar hybrid (more of a flat bar road bike, really) more than 75 miles in single day on several occasions (including one century) and it was always very comfortable. You don't need drop bars for long distance comfort, IMO.
    Luke Richardson - Shanghai, China
    Giant FCR3500 - "Big Red"

  10. #10
    Senior Member fairymuff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    296
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by The Chemist View Post
    Not true. I have ridden my flat bar hybrid (more of a flat bar road bike, really) more than 75 miles in single day on several occasions (including one century) and it was always very comfortable. You don't need drop bars for long distance comfort, IMO.
    I'll concur with that. I use my flat bar hybrid (with bar ends) for touring, and regularly ride that type of distance without any problem. In fact, I recently rode part of St. James way in Spain, a pilgrim's route that's quite popular with cyclists as well. I'd say that over 90% of the cyclists we encountered rode flat bar bikes (mostly MTBs). Fifty miles per day seemed to be about the average people were doing.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    176
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by droobieinop View Post

    A hybrid bike with a flat bar will not be comfortable over the type of distance that you will be riding. And you won't want to ride a $400 hybrid for 75 miles.
    Bike fit has more to do with comfort than price. Fix what you have and lose the clips if you don't like them.

  12. #12
    Senior Member droobieinop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Orange Park, Florida
    My Bikes
    jamis xenith comp '08, trek 750 hybrid (w/drops) c.1995, centurian fixie, kona cindercone mtb c.2000
    Posts
    846
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    To follow up on this I'd like to say there are many different bikes used on an MS ride however, the most efficient way to do the longer distance is on a road bike of some sort. Be it a full on racer, tourer, cyclocross, fixed gear or any other skinny tire bike.

    Flat bars limit hand position and fat tires have greater rolling resistance. Bar ends and aero bars can be, and are, often used. So are 26" slicks. And always go at a pace that is comfortable for you. Personally, even before I started racing, I wanted to get it over with. Sure I enjoy the ride (though I've never done a MS) but I don't want to spend any more time in the saddle than I have to. I'm always shooting for a personal best, right now that's a sub 5 century.

    Another point of interest here to me is the weight issue stated a few times above. My personal peak weight was 220#, and I mean no disrespect to those of you that were 300# plus. I take it that you've lost many pounds and you should be proud of yourselves. I've lost 60# over the last few years while cycling and working in a shop. What I find interesting the weight to comfort factor here.

    I understand the weight limitations to some wheels and the durability of some tires. A heavier individual, riding at a slower pace, in a more upright position, on sturdy wheels and wider tires will be more comfortable than if they were bent into the drops on a racer. It will likely be a long day in the saddle at 10-15 mph. However, there are plenty of well supported stops with food and mechanical help provided by volunteers who may be giving up a paid day to lend you a hand.
    "change is the only constant"

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •