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  1. #1
    Mrs. DataJunkie Luddite's Avatar
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    Metric/imperial century on your hybrid

    Has anyone done a metric or imperial century on their hybrid? More than once? Was it comfortable? Do you have special add ons on your hybrid to make this possible?

    I would like to a metric on my hybrid some day...

  2. #2
    Pedal faster not harder.
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    I did a metric century or more every Saturday and Sunday from late March into early April on a fully rigid mountain bike with 1 inch slicks. Once the roads were cleaner I brought out my nicer bikes. A high performance hybrid will more than do the job. I did a 154km ride in June on a Cannondale F4000 mountain bike with 1.5 inch slicks in 5 hours 20 something minutes. Your hybrid will do just fine with a more upright riding position to enjoy the view. Just bring enough liquids and food calories along to get the job done.



    Just imagine it with 1 inch slicks.


    I did a non-stop 154km ride on this mountain bike in June with the shown tires. Averaged 28.5kph for the ride.

    Your Hybrid will do 100km or more just fine. The more important question is will you?
    Last edited by LesMcLuffAlot; 08-29-09 at 10:06 AM.

  3. #3
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    I've done several metrics and rides up into the mid 80s, I have several full centuries on my calendar in the next month or two. All have been and will be done on my Jamis Coda. I ditched the suspension seatpost (I could never get the seat height just right due to the movement) and added bar ends and better grips...other than lights and luggage, that's all it took.
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    When I was younger I rode my mountain bike (one of the first original Norco Bigfoots) from Jasper, Alberta to Vancouver, BC -- just over 1,200 kms. I rode a few 100+ km days on that trip. I had mountain bike tires with a solid ridge in the middle -- I don't think you could even get slicks for a mountain bike back then (mid '80s). Even though the quality of that bike was awful compared to the quality of most inexpensive hybrids of today, I never once doubted that the bike could make it. As McLuffaLot aludes, it's up to the rider, more than the bike.

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    Sure, my 7.5 loves the distance! I put 700x23 tires on it for long rides on paved roads.

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    Senior Member Terrierman's Avatar
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    I've done metrics and one imperial century on my Jamis Coda Elite. Very enjoyable. The bike is not the issue when it comes to that sort of thing, it's the rider.
    It's all downhill from here. Except the parts that are uphill.

  7. #7
    Pax
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    I agree 100%, it's the rider.

    I was riding my road bike (Trek 1500 WSD) on a 50 mile organized ride, as I huffed and puffed along I heard a clunking sound coming up behind me, I turned just in time to make eye contact with a nice Amish man. He was riding a steel framed single speed antique of a bike...hauling a loaded trailer. We swapped pleasantries and he rode off, I saw him 30 or so miles later pulled up outside a feed store, he looked fresh as a daisy.

  8. #8
    Mrs. DataJunkie Luddite's Avatar
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    Les, what do you mean by "high performance?" A hybridized road bike?

  9. #9
    The Improbable Bulk Little Darwin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pax View Post
    I agree 100%, it's the rider.

    I was riding my road bike (Trek 1500 WSD) on a 50 mile organized ride, as I huffed and puffed along I heard a clunking sound coming up behind me, I turned just in time to make eye contact with a nice Amish man. He was riding a steel framed single speed antique of a bike...hauling a loaded trailer. We swapped pleasantries and he rode off, I saw him 30 or so miles later pulled up outside a feed store, he looked fresh as a daisy.
    Are you sure he was Amish? The Amish tend to disallow bicycles. My guess would be Mennonite.
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  10. #10
    The Improbable Bulk Little Darwin's Avatar
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    I have ridden a few metrics on my 2003 Giant Sedona DX. It had slicker tires than it originally had, and for at least my first metric, it still had the suspension fork. It now has a rigid fork. It still has the suspension seat post, but I have it cranked down so that it doesn't move.
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  11. #11
    Senior Member dauphin's Avatar
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    My first century was done on my Sirrus using Shimano spd pedals. That day, I wore a cheap pair of Specialized shoes (Tahoe) and no other special accessories. By the end of that ride, I had severe hot spots on my right foot along with numbness and brusing on that foot. I also had pretty severe numbness in my right hand. Not long after that, I added bar ends and got better shoes, although to this day, I still have problems with my right foot..just not as severe. I probably did some damage there. I think these bikes are fine up to a certain mileage before you start to encounter problems. I think the big thing is to add those bar ends so you can have more hand positions...that's one of the reasons I like the drop bars on my road bike.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Steve in MA's Avatar
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    I did a metric a few weeks ago on my Trek 7.3FX, and I've got a full century coming up in mid-September. Also, my usual Sunday morning ride on it is 40-50 miles. I find it to be very comfortable for distance rides. I think it helps that I've got Ergon grips with bar ends, so I can vary my hand position over the ride. My back and shoulders to be less sore after a ride than friends who are on road bikes.

    Also, the roads around here (Western Massachusetts/Northern Connecticut area) tend to be pretty hilly, so the gearing of my hybrid is very well suited to the courses.

  13. #13
    Pax
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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Darwin View Post
    Are you sure he was Amish? The Amish tend to disallow bicycles. My guess would be Mennonite.
    Could have been, there's a large Mennonite population in that area along with the Amish.

  14. #14
    Mrs. DataJunkie Luddite's Avatar
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    My total for today : 47+km. Almost halfway there and I could have kept on going if my back didn't hurt so much. I have no idea why my back freaked out. Ouch.

  15. #15
    Pedal faster not harder.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luddite View Post
    Les, what do you mean by "high performance?" A hybridized road bike?

    A bike with some sort of foot retention system. Ideally clipless pedals, but clips and strap if that is what you are using. Gearing on the back that is appropratiate, not a 14-34 with huge jumps in the ratios. The gear you're in is to hard and the next easier gear is way to easy. A riding postion that isn't totally upright that puts all your weight on your ass and doesn't share the weight load with your arms and hands. That is fine for a ride to the store. Longer rides that equals discomfort. Tires that can take at least 60psi, but 80-100psi is better. Barends are a great addition to offer more hand postions for comfort and to tuck out of the wind. 2 water bottle cages and a way to carry additional liquids(unless you can stop at a store) plus some easy to eat foods.

    All these things will make distance riding more enjoyable.

  16. #16
    Mrs. DataJunkie Luddite's Avatar
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    Do people take breaks during a century ride? I mean is it expected?

  17. #17
    Pedal faster not harder.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luddite View Post
    Do people take breaks during a century ride? I mean is it expected?
    I may be in small company on this one,

    For me. No. I do not take breaks or stop if at all possible on my distance rides. The whole challenge for me is to do the distance non-stop. The only acceptable reasons for stopping on a LesMcLuffAlot ride are....

    1. Obeying traffic laws. Red lights or Stop signs.

    2. Call of nature. #1 or #2. Must be a seriously pressing issue.

    3. Mechanical issues.

    4. Running into a car full of hot girls who invite you over for a party.

    Number 4 has never happened, but still waiting for it. As long as it's not uber-hot, I can carry enough food and water for 6 or 7 hours of non-stop riding.

    Come and ride with me. It's fun....

    LesMcLuffAlot

  18. #18
    Mrs. DataJunkie Luddite's Avatar
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    It would be the longest ride in history just to get to your area.

    So it is possible to do a metric with a flat bar bike, right? My back was killing me yesterday, but my back was bothering me BEFORE I rode in the mass.

  19. #19
    Pedal faster not harder.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luddite View Post
    It would be the longest ride in history just to get to your area.

    So it is possible to do a metric with a flat bar bike, right? My back was killing me yesterday, but my back was bothering me BEFORE I rode in the mass.
    Definately possible, but expect sore hands. There is lots of advice on this hybrid forum about adding bar ends to increase comfort. I will point out that bar ends were invented to aid in hill climbing. Using them while going uphill, uses more of your biceps and shoulders, gives more leverage and helps transfer power more effectively. The added benefit of them is more hand postions.

    So when you add bar ends the angle you set them at is important. I generally use mine more for out of of the saddle efforts as they mimick the brake hoods position on a road bike handlebar. Or for getting lower to tuck out of the wind. So mine are set a lower angle of attack. This makes them less useful for hillclimbing as they are set rather low to be used comfortably for seated hill climbing. So if you buy some and your LBS sets them at one angle and you want to try a few others. Change the angle a few times until you find one that works best for you.

    I have a extra set of Profile Design bar ends that are barely used. I am willing to gift them to you no charge and ship them no charge if you live in Canada. I ask only that you pay the favour foward to another cyclist ideally, but any human being will do. Just provide a shipping address.



    As for your lower back pain. There could be lots of reasons for that. Cycling is a sport where having a strong lower back is very helpful, but does almost nothing to develop one.

    http://www.ab-core-and-stomach-exerc...exercises.html

    A link to exercises you can do at home with some requiring no additional equipment.

    LesMcLuffAlot

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    Good post and generous offer. Luddite, if you don't have bar ends, grab those. I'd set them pretty level to the ground even for hill climbing.

    I met a guy who rode from San Francisco to Boston and from there to DC, on a hundred plus year old ordinary. I had the good fortune to ride the last leg with him and other cross country riders who converged very near my home in Maryland for a group ride into the capital city. He was over sixty years old. Yes you can.

  21. #21
    Strong with the Fred Big_e's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luddite View Post
    Do people take breaks during a century ride? I mean is it expected?
    I've only did one metric century so far (not on a hybrid). There are small 15 to 20 minute stops (controls), usually at a grocery store or a place with water. Enough time to get your card signed by the store clerk or person manning the control. You are expected to take in food and water before continueing on. There was 3 stops on the metric century I was on. Don't do what I did and try to be cute and not eat anything at the last of the stops. Of course everybody tells me that a metric century is nothing, that means I need to keep working harder.
    There wasn't any hybrids in the group.
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  22. #22
    Mrs. DataJunkie Luddite's Avatar
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    Thanks, Les, I PM'd you.

    A lot of those exercises are reminiscent of Yoga, huh.

    My back was giving me grief while I was waiting around for Critical Mass to start, no idea what set it off.

    I have my seat set up where it should be now, got it adjusted and new rear brake pads today. I wonder if having my seat too low contributed to my back ouchies, I figured that would just create knee pain.

    Incidentally, LBS guy seemed a bit amazed I did 47km in one day on that bike, he designed the bike. This bothers me, I guess he didn't design it for maniacs like me but I hope I can tweak the bike for longer distances.

    Huge thanks to Les for the bar ends, I hope they help me achieve my goal.

  23. #23
    Mrs. DataJunkie Luddite's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LesMcLuffAlot View Post
    A bike with some sort of foot retention system. Ideally clipless pedals, but clips and strap if that is what you are using. Gearing on the back that is appropratiate, not a 14-34 with huge jumps in the ratios. The gear you're in is to hard and the next easier gear is way to easy. A riding postion that isn't totally upright that puts all your weight on your ass and doesn't share the weight load with your arms and hands. That is fine for a ride to the store. Longer rides that equals discomfort. Tires that can take at least 60psi, but 80-100psi is better. Barends are a great addition to offer more hand postions for comfort and to tuck out of the wind. 2 water bottle cages and a way to carry additional liquids(unless you can stop at a store) plus some easy to eat foods.

    All these things will make distance riding more enjoyable.
    I did 47km wearing well, Crocs with regular pedals with an inappropriately low seat. I have panniers to load up with eats/liquids/pump/etc. I am going to add a second drink cage one of these days, too.

    I made a resolution to ride the entire Critical Mass rather than duck out early, I get a lot of Kms in that way.

  24. #24
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    I did almost a metric a week or so ago. I was really wishing that I had a few more hand positions.......

  25. #25
    Mrs. DataJunkie Luddite's Avatar
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    I tend to shake my hands/elbows out periodically, seems to help a bit.

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