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  1. #1
    Junior Member canismajor's Avatar
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    Question Frame size and geometry advice

    I'm new to 21st century bicycling and looking for a hybrid that will be comfortable for 2-3 hours of exercise on roads and paths. I've done a little research around the web and on these forums, and I've decided on a Trek 7.2 '09. When I took one for a short test ride I didn't like how much of my weight was on the handlebars, the 7000 series was much better in this regard. The sales rep said they could put different handlebars on that would tilt towards me more. Would that really make it feel like the 7000, or does the frame geometry matter more? I have RSI in my hands so it's important that the bike doesn't force me to lean down on the bars.

    The next problem was the frame size, I didn't notice much change between a 20" frame and a 22", except that the latter was harder to mount. Why do people say that sizing is so important? I'm 6' tall with about a 34" inseam, if that helps. The shop I visited was a Trek dealer so I haven't ridden any other brands.

  2. #2
    Senior Member MorganRaider's Avatar
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    If you have RSI, I would strongly consider going with a 7000 series. I am not sure you can get relief with a flatbar hybrid like the FX series. However, if you have your heart set on the 7.2FX, try a stem with a higher angle like a 105 mm with 17 deg Rise. Now, you can probably put a 45 deg stem on the FX, but it will affect the power transfer efficiency in your pedaling. I think the 7.2 comes with a 100 mmm 10 deg. Also try gel padded gloves and decent had grips such as Ergon brand.

    Frame size - based on your height and inseam, you should be in the 22.5"

    Sizing or Fit is extremely important because if it's not right, injuries will happen sooner than later. If the fit is right, your less likely to get injured. Also if the bike feels good, you are more likely to ride. You can really get messed up with injury if you 1. Don't have a bike that fits and 2. Ride too much too soon.
    At the higher stem angle, it may put more strain on your knees because your working the quads more than the gluets. Remember to get the saddle height right, and don't mash the higher gears. In other words pedal faster with lower gears - less strain on knees.

    Try to find a LBS with a certified fitter and pick their brain and be sure the bike fits you before plunking down the visa.

    Also be aware of a recall on some TREK hybrids and make sure the store has it covered. Here is the link.
    http://www.healthycanadians.ca/pr-rp...=&StartIndex=1
    I hope that helps.
    Last edited by MorganRaider; 09-11-09 at 08:27 PM.

  3. #3
    Junior Member canismajor's Avatar
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    Great tips, thanks MorganRaider. I might upgrade some of the components on a 7000 instead of changing handlebars on a 7.2.

  4. #4
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    Have you considered the square of the hypotenuse? You know it's equal to the squares of the other two sides. That's my contribution to geometry questions.

  5. #5
    Senior Member MorganRaider's Avatar
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    No problem:

    I just ran across this. It's pretty helpful.
    http://www.jacksbikes.com/index1.html

    I saw this '10 7300 model at my LBS yesterday and my jaw dropped. The color scheme is TIGHT.
    Great looking bike. The stem is adjustable so you should be able to get it dialed in pretty well. The picture on the web site does not do it justice. There would be no shame in going from that gold 7.2FX to this.

    http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes...h/hybrid/7300/

    I will put a plug in for TREK - they back their warranty. I have not experienced other brands so that's not to say they don't
    Last edited by MorganRaider; 09-11-09 at 09:06 PM.

  6. #6
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    Hey first post on hybrid forum.Rivendell site has great advice for fitting.Im 6ft and 34 inseam,based on Rivendell advise you need 23inchs from bottom bracket to top tube(stand over) and seat will be 30 inchs from bb.It works for me.

  7. #7
    Senior Member JonathanGennick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by canismajor View Post
    The next problem was the frame size, I didn't notice much change between a 20" frame and a 22", except that the latter was harder to mount. Why do people say that sizing is so important?
    There are probably two things going on here: Many people can fit more than one size of frame--the "I'm in between sizes syndrome". And it is sometimes difficult to really notice a difference between sizes on a short test-ride. Ride each bike for an hour, and you'd probably begin to notice some things.

    It's possible that the larger of the two sizes would have the bars higher relative to your seat. That might help with your RSI. It might be worth taking another test-ride with that in mind. Maybe ask the LBS to put on a shorter stem, to make the reach from saddle to bar more like that on the smaller-framed bike.

    My only other thought is to say that very small changes can sometimes make all the difference. A few years ago I bought a flat-bar bike that gave me pain after only a couple of miles of riding. At first I thought I'd made a huge mistake, but then I began experimenting with bar and stem combinations. I went through at least four bars and probabaly a half-dozen stems before finding a combination that worked. The difference between what worked and what didn't work was on the order of a 1/4" difference in rise in the bars. An Easton low-rise bar caused pain. An Easton mid-rise bar was great. An Easton high-rise bar put me too upright.

  8. #8
    Senior Member meanwhile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by canismajor View Post
    I have RSI in my hands so it's important that the bike doesn't force me to lean down on the bars.
    Did you tell the bike store this? They should have explained to you that stems and handlebars are easily changed - you need a shorter and higher stem to keep weight off your hands. Ergon grips might help too.

  9. #9
    I Love My Dream
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    Quote Originally Posted by ddez View Post
    Hey first post on hybrid forum.Rivendell site has great advice for fitting.Im 6ft and 34 inseam,based on Rivendell advise you need 23inchs from bottom bracket to top tube(stand over) and seat will be 30 inchs from bb.It works for me.
    Works really well if your being fitted for a Rivendell bike, I'm not too sure otherwise.
    It's none of my business what other people think of me.

  10. #10
    I Love My Dream
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    Quote Originally Posted by canismajor View Post
    I have RSI in my hands so it's important that the bike doesn't force me to lean down on the bars.
    Top tube length then becomes far more important than standover height.
    It's none of my business what other people think of me.

  11. #11
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    As they say on Rivendell, raise dat stem! Comfort is just as important as ergonomics, especially on a two to three hour ride.

  12. #12
    aka Phil Jungels Wanderer's Avatar
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    Hard to fault the 7000 series ---- like others, the 7300 might end up being a "best buy" for the money. The 7500 series (even though it has some nice features, if money isn't an object) is a lot more money, for not much more benefit. Makes the 7300 look pretty good. I'd ride 'em all, and then decide.....
    Last edited by Wanderer; 09-19-09 at 12:06 PM.

  13. #13
    Junior Member canismajor's Avatar
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    Thanks to all of you for the advice. I ended up going with a 20" frame for the shorter top tube length, high-rise bars, an adjustable stem, and Ergon GR2s.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by NormanF View Post
    As they say on Rivendell, raise dat stem! Comfort is just as important as ergonomics, especially on a two to three hour ride.
    Yup!

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