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Old 10-09-09, 03:48 PM   #1
HeabyMetawHunta
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Dont know what to get

No clue what to look for in a new bike. My knowledge in bikes is minimal. I live in the San Fernando area in CA and the roads are kind of rough.
I have been riding a nikishi road bike and just run into to many potholes in the street, which I try to avoid but some streets are just really messed up. Problem is ALL streets leading to my job are rough.
I donít enjoy riding a mountain bike as much, and love riding my road bike, but the constant flat tires have driven me to seek a new bike.
I have been reading up hybrids on here, and have come to the conclusion that maybe I can get a road bike but with wider tires, to maybe prevent the higher risk of getting flats? Or would be better off maybe buying a hybrid? Or is there another option I havnt considered?
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Old 10-09-09, 04:23 PM   #2
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www.jamisbikes.com Click on 2009, comes -up on top, NOT the 2010 PDF file.

They make the Aurora models 2 ; Codas & other fast flatbar bikes are available as well. Some have suspension, some are chrmly, others aluminum. It's a good bike with an easy site, offering good examples.

www.trekbikes.com look in Bike Path section & they have the Portland under Road Bikes

www.giant-bicycles.com Transend LX looks good. Others may, it's huge site.

Specialized, Fuji and others have Hybrid types. Fuji has a tourer so does Trek.
Your area has LBS that carry these brands.
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Old 10-09-09, 04:25 PM   #3
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How about some tires for the Nikishi with some flat protection?

My favorite are specialized armadillos.

Btw, I don't see how potholes lead to flats. Unless they're pinch flats and you run your tires at a low pressure.

Another option, is some sort of bicycle that will let you have wider tires. The wider tires can be run at lower pressure to help absorb the impact from the potholes. If you like the feel of your Nikishi, then maybe a touring bike or a cyclocross bike.

If you want a change in style, and like flat bars, then look at hybrids.
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Old 10-09-09, 06:47 PM   #4
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I assume its the potholes, i have to replace my tube every 3 or 4 weeks and i bought new tires. Could be something else?
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Old 10-09-09, 07:19 PM   #5
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If you're not seeing punctures then you're under inflating, your getting pinch flats, popping them like balloons. A good floor pump with a built-in guage is manditory to inflate sufficiantly, I prefer to inflte to max. A spoke might be pokin' at them or some other weird thing.

I use Armadillos myself, 28s. The fattast tires on the bikes I recommended have 32s and some have 28s. A 32 tire is better but still that flat problem doesn't figure. These bikes are five or more hundred dollars.

mike makes alot of good points; another one is a Cyclecross bike, Jamis and others which I didn't list make them too. These bikes are well over a thousand and have stiff wheels using 32 or greater tires.

Often times here, we get such questions, only to learn that the OP askng the original question has no intention or is able to spend mush money so ...? Frankly, I do believe another bike is in order. keep the Nishiki for other conditions, the wheels might not be suited anyway.
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Old 10-09-09, 07:24 PM   #6
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I use Rivendell Ruffy Tuffy tires in 700 X 27C. These are wonderfully responsive tires that hold the road excellently - yet are very quick and nimble. And they have a 2mm band of Kevlar. I take these on dirt and gravel for miles on end. Never had a flat.

Another good one to look into are Continental Gatorskins. Very tough and similar to the Armadillos.
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Old 10-09-09, 07:51 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by HeabyMetawHunta View Post
I assume its the potholes, i have to replace my tube every 3 or 4 weeks and i bought new tires. Could be something else?
What kind of tires did you buy?

And a tube every 3 or 4 weeks isn't too bad... Have you tried patching your tires?

Where are the punctures in the tubes? Are you checking for stuff sticking through your tire?

If you're getting flats from just potholes, you're most definitely underinflating.
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Old 10-09-09, 11:22 PM   #8
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No clue what to look for in a new bike. My knowledge in bikes is minimal. I live in the San Fernando area in CA and the roads are kind of rough.
I have been riding a nikishi road bike and just run into to many potholes in the street, which I try to avoid but some streets are just really messed up. Problem is ALL streets leading to my job are rough.
I donít enjoy riding a mountain bike as much, and love riding my road bike, but the constant flat tires have driven me to seek a new bike.
I have been reading up hybrids on here, and have come to the conclusion that maybe I can get a road bike but with wider tires, to maybe prevent the higher risk of getting flats? Or would be better off maybe buying a hybrid? Or is there another option I havnt considered?
A cyclocross bike - a drop handle racer built a little tougher and with clearance for off road tyres - sounds like the answer. The pros use them for the tougher road races like the Paris Roubaix. Put 35-40mm Marathon Supremes or Extremes on and its hard to imagine any road in the western world being a problem. The two easiest bikes to find are probably the Kona Jake and the Specialized Tricross. If you're happy with drop handle bikes, this really is the way to go - you get the more varied and comfortable hand positions, lower centre of rider gravity for better handling, and aerodynamics of a racer, with the wider tyres of a hybrid.
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Old 10-09-09, 11:31 PM   #9
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If you're not seeing punctures then you're under inflating, your getting pinch flats, popping them like balloons.
It's possible that the end of a spoke is doing the damage. The wheels might need tweaking, but new rim tape is worth a try.
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Old 10-09-09, 11:40 PM   #10
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It's possible that the end of a spoke is doing the damage. The wheels might need tweaking, but new rim tape is worth a try.
I like your Cycle Cross idea too.. Tires are one approach; diagnosing, replacing.

Getting a new bike is never a bad idea if it's the right one. Road bikes can only be expected to do so much. The man uses his bike for transportation which may warrant a perfectly suitable bike. A brother of mine gets a new bike every 10 years, I don't talk him out of it. Gives the old ones away. That I only occassionally do.
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Old 10-10-09, 05:07 AM   #11
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I like your Cycle Cross idea too.. Tires are one approach; diagnosing, replacing.

Getting a new bike is never a bad idea if it's the right one. Road bikes can only be expected to do so much. The man uses his bike for transportation which may warrant a perfectly suitable bike. A brother of mine gets a new bike every 10 years, I don't talk him out of it. Gives the old ones away. That I only occassionally do.
Having ridden all the main categories of bike, I don't think that there is any bike more fun or more practical than a good crosser. Just be ready to swap the stock tyres - most bikes come with knobblies for mud and gravel, and these really mess up handling on the road. They don't always pull speed down by that much, but they can really mess up all-out braking and turning.
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Old 10-10-09, 09:43 AM   #12
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For handling, Marathon Supremes really shine. Their wrap around tread makes for no transitions in the turns, outstanding traction, wet or dry, and absolutely outstanding puncture protection. A really bright reflective sidewall rounds them out for road use.

I use two different sizes on my bike. 35's on the front for quicker, and more precise handling, and 40's on the rear for load capacity and comfort. A good mix, without any adverse effects from either tire.
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Old 10-10-09, 06:02 PM   #13
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Like other posters have mentioned first find out what exactly is causing your flats. Take off the tire and the innertube and inspect both visually and manually as well as the rim. Even if you are in the market for a new bike it is always nice to know what was wrong with the old one.
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Old 10-13-09, 05:00 PM   #14
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I checked out the tubes that popped, and 1 or 2 had little slits on them, but most had little pinhole holes that i couldn't really see. I also noticed my front rim is slighty bent, which i didnt know how i didnt notice this before. Im definetly going to look into cyclocross bikes, seems pretty rugged from what i've read/ seen so far. I wouldn't mind spending maybe 5-6$ on abike, i bought the nikishi used for about $3 and had it tuned up and alltogether cost me about $400 and have had it for about 3 years now. I think it would be a good investment seeing how much i use the bike. now to figure out exactly which bike is right! thanks!!!!
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