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Old 02-06-10, 06:23 AM   #1
highroller
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Got a puncture.

I'm using tyres with kevlar bead which is supposed to prevent puncture. I have only started using them 2 weeks ago along with new presta tubes and didnt bring spares thinking the kevlar would stop these sort of small punctures. I was thinking of catching the train, but as I was a few hundred metres away from the train station the train arrived and departed. They were doing maintenance at the next stop and were using buses from their until my destination, but buses dont allow bikes on board. Luck the ticket machine was busted or I would have blown my money. So I had to walk 8-9km home.

The tube had a small hole but I couldn't find any penetration mark on the tyre tread after thoroughly examining it with a magnified glass for over 30 minutes. So I dont know how the puncture happened.

Is there any inner tube lining that can be used as an additional barrier between the tyre and the tube?
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Old 02-06-10, 10:28 AM   #2
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A kevlar belt by itself probably does reduce your risk of punctures, but nothing really eliminates it.

There's a product in the USA called Mr Tuffy; not sure if it's available where you live, though I'd imagine there's something like it. It's a belt that fits between your tire and tube. It is effective against punctures from most road debris, but of course will do nothing for snakebite flats, puncture-weed flats, that sort of thing. It also really changes the feel of your ride--you'll have to decide whether you prioritize ride quality or puncture proofing.

Schwalbe's Marathon Plus tire has a reputation for being heavy but bulletproof; in Schwalbe's line, I believe anything with "plus" in the name has a puncture-resistant layer in the tread.
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Old 02-06-10, 04:36 PM   #3
irclean
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A cheap but effective method is to take an old tube and cut it in half - inner from outer. Use the outer half to line the inside of your tire and Bob's your uncle. Be forwared that it does add some rotating weight, but you may or may not notice.
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Old 02-08-10, 10:32 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by highroller View Post
The tube had a small hole but I couldn't find any penetration mark on the tyre tread after thoroughly examining it with a magnified glass for over 30 minutes. So I dont know how the puncture happened.
One way to find the object that caused the puncture it is to run a cotton ball around the inside of the tire. The cotton will snag on whatever caused the puncture. Two likely candidates are a small piece of glass or a short wire thrown off from the blowout of an auto or truck belted tire.

It's a good idea to always carry a spare tube and a patch kit. No tire is puncture proof, not even Schwalbe Marathons. Other things besides simple punctures can damage a tube.

Hitting a large piece of glass or metal, could cut through the sidewall. Bumping a valve or bending it when you fill the tire can damage the valve stem where it sticks through the wheel. Hitting a pothole when there isn't enough air in the tire can give you a pinch flat.

A spare tube plus a patch kit is easy insurance.
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Old 02-08-10, 11:56 PM   #5
MilitantPotato
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Kevlar is a type of fabric, it stops larger objects from getting through, but is useless for thin/sharp objects like glass shards, wire, and thorns. Need a thick layer of dense rubber for real flat protection. Kevlar is more for some help, and decent weight. Kevlar can stop a bullet but be pierced by a knife, not sure why it's so popular in tires.
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Old 02-09-10, 04:52 PM   #6
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I have tires with kevlar (specialized armadillo) and have not gotten a single flat from glass, rocks, or thorns. They're pretty good at preventing flats from outside objects (I've pulled out numerous pieces of glass and rock embedded in the outside). However it did not prevent the flat that happened when I overinflated the tube. Always carry a spare tube if you don't want to walk home.

As for the OP's problem, check the rim and rim tape to make sure nothing the inside is causing the puncture.
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