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  1. #1
    Max-4
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    What Size Rocky Mountain Metro 50-D?

    I am in love with the Rocky Mountain Metro 50-D Hybrid Bike from a Canadian company in BC. I am looking for a bike to be able to ride about 75% road and 25% gravel trails with. This bike does not have any front suspension which I like and seems to be pretty well equipped for the money. It has 700C size wheels and a suspension seat post and an adjustable handle bar stem. Looks like it will be a real nice bike for riding around town or exploring some nice hidden paths.

    Problem is both my local dealers dont have any in stock and they will have to order one in. Now it comes in either a 20" or 22" frame measured from the center crank to the top of the seat post stem. I am about 6'2" and weigh 216lbs and I have an inseam of 33.4".

    The 20" frame comes with 808mm of standover height and the 22" frame comes with 841mm of standover. For my height and inseam length which bike would I be better suited with. With a ridgid front fork, fast commuter style bike like this how big are they supposed to fit on you? I am a pretty experienced cyclist and can handle a bike, I just wasnt sure how an all around hybrid is supposed to fit.

    Bike im looking at:
    http://www.bikes.com/main+en+01_102+...ID=3&SCATID=28

  2. #2
    Powered by Veggies Midol_Mohawk's Avatar
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    I have a rocky mountain road bike, they make some great stuff! ride it before you buy it though. as far as standover height is concerned, i would pick a height closer to road bike geometry vs mountain roadbike geometry. however if you will be taking it off-road 1/4 of the time, you may need a little extra standover. i think in your specific case you really need to test ride it.

    Just saw this...IDK how much the LBS is charging you, but I got my Prestige 30CR through them

    http://www.realcyclist.com/roadbike/.../RMB0031M.html
    "I hope people will think that I am:

    Independent minded. Original. A person with a sense of humor. Somebody who doesn't take himself too seriously."
    -Sheldon Brown

  3. #3
    Max-4
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    So I did get to actually stand over a 22" Metro yesterday and with a pair of running shoes on my family jewels are almost resting on the top bar, not touching but close. If i was to pull the bike up until it was firm against my pubic bone I would say I have about 1.5"-2".

    How is a hybrid like this supposed to fit? Is there another feature I should be looking at that will tell me if the larger 22" frame is better than a 20"?

  4. #4
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    I would think that if your duties are stricktly on the paved roads and paths, the standover height that allows you to flatfoot without fear of "ringing the bells" is best. It's supposed to be a measurement up to the pubic bone with 2-4" or some such but it seems to me that if you are not the owner of an especially long and dangly pair or bells the fishing tackle sitting atop the top bar sounds juuuust a tad close. It really does sound like you are at the cusp where you may justify one or the other. I don't think the metro is the off-road type but if that is in your plan somewhere I would def go for more clearance with the 20" frame, just stretch that seatpost out an inch or so.

    Did you notice the top tube length/reach to bars on the Metro? I also have one (2009) and it strikes me as shorter than what I'm familiar with. I'm not the most versed with regard this so I cant state as to how a hybrid necessarily "should" fit but I find that the comparatively shorter top tube length makes for a longer more comfortable time in the saddle when compared to my mtb bike that has a definite stretch and reach to the bars (both stems are approx the same length). The 700c wheels, the short wheelbase makes for a comfortable yet agile ride I find. I believe the 2010's have a different fork than that of the 2009's so that will also redefine the ride qualities from last year, I suspect it will be a smidgen more relaxed as the fork has more of a forward curve to it thus it seems to have a slightly longer wheelbase.

    I'm very impressed by the quality of product I see with the Rocky Mountain line, such a great balance of component and price. Hopefully someone more experienced with this bike/type can chime in. I'm new to hybrids and have only had mine for a couple of months.

    If you were able to get a "stand over", were you not able to get a test ride at all?

  5. #5
    Max-4
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    Test Ride...

    Im sorry, so I did get to ride the 22" frame for about 5 mins in a big parking lot. I am able to come to a stop and jump to a standover position without "ringing the bells" the pair of jeans that I was wearing brushed the top tube in my crotch giving me the sense that it was there.

    If I had to give an accurate measurment I would say that with my running shoes on I have about 2.5" of true standover height from the top tube to my pubic bone. The feeling of the tube hitting my jewels I think came from the jeans I was wearing.

    So by my calculations from the Rocky Mountain site the 20" frame will give me 3.5" to 4" of true standover clearence. Is that too much? With these bikes is it not better to get something on the larger side, it will allow me to raise the bars higher for more comfort right?

    I didn't have any problems jumping from the seat to a standover position on the 22", I did not crush the jewels on the top tube.
    Last edited by Max-4; 03-29-10 at 08:10 PM.

  6. #6
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    I would think that if you are wearing apparel typical to what you will wear when riding, and I think a typical hybrid kind of guy isnt to caught up in the tight lycra much at all, likely a jeans/shorts tshirt/pullover kinda guy/gal not to suggest they arent serious about their biking tho. But if you like a loose pair of pants and you get the sense you can jump off the bike, land on your feet and skooch backward i.e in the scenario that you came to an abrupt/unplanned stop and need to react yet be controlled and safe and you dont get the sense you will crack the nuts, then I would say gofer 22.

    Like I said, I have a 22" and mine fits perfectly, I have a very comfortable reach to the bars which are at a virtually neutral height thus the fine balance between racy and relaxed, they are "just right". You are close in height me and frankly a test ride generally lets you know if she fits or not. Like the fellas here say, and is normal when finding the right bike, test ride until you happen on the right one, so how's about test sitting and riding the 20" also?

    I did re-discover that I do in fact dislike straight handlebars. The lack of adjustability got on my nerves and I changed my bars. I say this because I discovered that the length of cable (brake and gears (mine has the alfine)) was just sufficiently long enough for the stem/bars that it ships with stock, I put on-one mary bars on and had a rough time getting enough cable length to not bind them up when going to an hard right/left turn. So if you plan on using other bars, see about having them fit them and having enough cable length not to be an issue. This is assuming you are buying it from a shop local to you and not via mail like I did.

  7. #7
    Max-4
    Guest
    The store I went to only had the 22" in stock and it is not where I am going to buy the bike from. I get a smoking deal from another dealer in my town but he will have to order it in for me.

    Thanks for your information, so basically if most of my riding is going to be 75% pavement and 25% gravel pathways, I should really opt for the frame that is on the bigger side without crushing my boyz when trying to stradle the top tube.

    The 22" really felt fine to me, I could dismount without singing soprano. I would accurately say I had 2.5" of true standover height with running shoes on (1" sole). Does this sound like it would be in the right ballpark for a comfortable but fast riding hybrid for my purposes?

    Am I right in saying that the larger frame would then allow me to raise the angle of the stem higher thus giving me a bit better riding position and not being too stretched out?
    Last edited by Max-4; 03-29-10 at 09:09 PM.

  8. #8
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    If the 22" felt great to you then wonderful, as I've been told in the past, if the frame is too big and you cant flat foot it, dont even ride it...it could be very dangerous..and painful. But you could flat foot it so great. One of the techniques used is to stand straddling the frame, one hand on the stem, the other hand on the back of the seat and pick the bike up so that the top tube is against your pubic bone (nudge the boys outta the way) and verify you have a couple of inches ground clearance. If you have at least 2-3 fingers of thickness between the tube and the pubic bone prior to the pickup, then ur golden!

    So far as raising the angle of of the stem, I dont think you can do that with the stock stem, it's at a set angle (+ angle) anyhow, all you can do is make sure that the spacers on the fork neck are below the stem rather than above to raise the height of the stem/bars, else you are looking at replacing the stem and getting your own that either has an adjustable angle (ritchey for example) or on with a steeper fixed angle...again..you may have that cable length issue I had, resolvable if you are willing to run new cable..but mine has mechanical disk brakes and I think the 2010's have hydraulic..so long as they give you enough extra length to pursue options..else you are looking at some parts and a little bit of labor of your own (or LBS).

    I only have my other bike to compare it too but I feel the geometry of the metro frame does not have me stretched out at all, I was pleasantly surprised at the relatively compact dimensions of the top tube, made riding a pleasure. No stretching out, no undue weight on the wrists, no unwanted back strain...pretty sweet ergos for hybriddin' I do which admittedly is purely on finished surfaces but it will certainly handle gravel paths easily enough presuming it has the same Kendra kwick Trax tires as last year.

    I too am very new to the Rocky Mountain family of product, but it strikes me that they have a very well thought out and constructed product, I'm very, very pleased with my bike.
    Last edited by Moozh; 03-30-10 at 12:07 AM.

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