Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    23
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Ready to buy a Trek 7200 but checking with you guys first!

    Newbie here, been lurking for a few weeks to learn about hybrids.
    Currently on a Trek Comfort 3 Bike which I really like. Bought it about 4 years ago and planed on riding wood trails as well as some paved riding.
    Recently helped to form a bike club at work for fitness. Looked back at the type of riding I do and realized I ride 95% pavement and 5% hard packed dirt roads. Decided I wanted a new bike better fitted for the type of riding I do so I am now looking at hybrids.

    I like my Trek Comfort so I sarted looking at the Trek hybrids. Test road the FX. Really nice and fast but a bit rough riding and the flat bars put to much pressure on my wirst.

    Then tried the 7100. That I like. The suspension fork took out the rough ride and the 50mm rise bars gave me a good upright position that took just enough pressure off of my wrists. (The comfort had 80mm rise I believe). I also like the adustability of the handlebar stem.

    I also looked at the 7200 and I like the upgrade in componenets it offers, as well as the colors. Sharper looking bikes go faster, right?

    The only other bike I could find that was comparable to the 7200 was the Cannondale Adventure 5 or 4 but I have not been able to find one to test ride.

    Here are my questions:
    1. Am I missing something I should consider?
    2. Can I change out the suspension fork in the future?
    3. Any weak components on the 7200 I should be wary of?
    Regards,
    Ward

    2010 White Trek 7300

  2. #2
    aka Phil Jungels Wanderer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    North Aurora, IL
    My Bikes
    Road & Hybrid
    Posts
    5,467
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you have settled on a front suspension bike, make sure you get one with a lock out suspension, for when you don't need it - they do take a lot of energy away from the pedals.

    Not knowing what your budget is, the 7300 is a better frame, and the 7500 offers better components. Most of these bikes will be on sale as soon as the new models come out next month.

    Also consider a Specialized Crosstrail, which is a very similar style of bike, and I know they have lock out capabilities. You can always put narrower tires on it when they come due.

    If you really don't "need" a front suspension, you'd be a lot better off with something like the FX or Sirrus. You can "soften" the ride with tire pressure adjustments, or larger tires. They like to go faster....... Bars are easy to switch, and so are stems. Even things like different grips (like Ergons) or gel gloves, make a big difference in buzz.

    Another thing to keep in mind, is that the nine speeds offer a better range of gears, especially when you are on the middle ring.

    Bring up the negatives to the dealer, and ask them about switching things to the way you want them - many dealers do that without hesitation. Tell him you like the 7.3 FX, but like the bars and stem from the 7300, and want wider/narrower tires if they will fit. They just might swap 'em to complete the deal, especially on a Last years model. On the FX you get Deore RD, instead of Alivio.

    MHO

    3rd edit: another thing to try, for when it is still in the showroom. My dealer is always willing to swap tires for only the difference in price.

    You might be able to swap tires to something like Schwalbe Marathon Supremes, in 32 or 35 widths, for as little as $20..... they would offer a superior ride, handling, roll, wear, flat protection, and traction, along with a brite reflective sidewall. It's better to get the price break on them while they are still new, than pay full price later.

    OK, I'm done...
    Last edited by Wanderer; 06-16-10 at 07:51 AM.

    "Retirement is the best job I ever had!" Me, 2009


    Specialized Crosstrail Sport - '08
    Nishiki Sport - misappropriated from my youngest son (circa 1984)
    Marin Stinson - misappropriated by my youngest grandson - '01
    "The Beast" - 1990 Schwinn Airdyne (in the basement for winter torture)

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Texas
    My Bikes
    2012 Trek 7.2FX, 2014 Domane 2.3C
    Posts
    105
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I would def opt for the 7300 over the 7200....extra $$$ well worth it for the better specs.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    39
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My wife and I own 7300's (as well as a couple of other bikes). Our rides on the 7300's are typically 40-55 kms (25 to 30 miles or so). The front suspension is in no way an issue that dramatically detracts from our riding. The 35mm (about an inch) front suspension smoothes out the jarring to the hands and forearms that can occur on rougher roads .The geometry and braze-ons allow for comfortable touring as well. They are great bicycles. If you like the comfort features the 7000 series offers you then go for it. My opininon is that if you have the extra $'s then go for the better components.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    39
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Forgot to add: should you decide to change the forks on the 7300 (if that's the model you decide to buy) the forks you will need are:

    Rake: 45mm
    Steer Tube length: 320mm
    Axle to Crown: 405mm

    You can go for a Trek fork or an aftermarket one.

  6. #6
    aka Phil Jungels Wanderer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    North Aurora, IL
    My Bikes
    Road & Hybrid
    Posts
    5,467
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have a front suspension because of physical limitations. Just as a point of information/reference. They do an admirable job of helping me deal with my problems.

    That being said: anyone who has stood up, while pedalling uphill, and hasn't had SERIOUS pogoing of the front end, only weighs 75 (or less) pounds. They do "SERIOUSLY" steal energy from you. Which is why you need a lock out capability - for when you don't want/need them.

    "Retirement is the best job I ever had!" Me, 2009


    Specialized Crosstrail Sport - '08
    Nishiki Sport - misappropriated from my youngest son (circa 1984)
    Marin Stinson - misappropriated by my youngest grandson - '01
    "The Beast" - 1990 Schwinn Airdyne (in the basement for winter torture)

  7. #7
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    23
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks much for the input. Called a new dealer today who listed Closeout pricing on the 7500. Did not have my size in stock. We talked awhile, I explained what I was riding, how and on what I ride. He told me the pros and cons of the suspension systems and suggested I let him set up a 7.3FX with stem and bars that match the 7000 series and try it. If I like it, cost is just slightly higher than the 7200.
    Hope to get there tonight.
    Regards,
    Ward

    2010 White Trek 7300

  8. #8
    aka Phil Jungels Wanderer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    North Aurora, IL
    My Bikes
    Road & Hybrid
    Posts
    5,467
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you like it - you will be glad you went that way ------ IMHO

    "Retirement is the best job I ever had!" Me, 2009


    Specialized Crosstrail Sport - '08
    Nishiki Sport - misappropriated from my youngest son (circa 1984)
    Marin Stinson - misappropriated by my youngest grandson - '01
    "The Beast" - 1990 Schwinn Airdyne (in the basement for winter torture)

  9. #9
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    23
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    OK, missed my shot at that dealer with the closeout pricing so went to the other dealer that has been working with me. They put an adjustable stem, raised all the way up, on a sweet 7.3 FX. That raised the bars just above seat level. World of difference!
    When I tested the same bike a couple of weeks ago my wrist were hurting after 5 laps around the shopping center. Couldn't wait to get off the bike.
    Today, with the bars much higher, I did over 20 laps with no wrist pain. Bumps were not a problem. The stock seat did not fit well but I think a new, more cushioned seat and I could have rode all day!
    The 7.3 is stretching my budget but I might be able to swing it. I could drop down to the 7.2 and be within budget range. But, the dealer said 7.2s are in very short supply in my size.
    Now this is where I became confused.
    When talking about tires she told me that the FX was a street bike, not a hybrid. She said the wheels might not hold up on anything other than pavement. I pointed out the 7.2 had the same wheels as the 7200 and she said that they worked on the 7200 because of the suspension.
    My other dealer, who first put me on a FX said it would be fine on crushed stone, hard dirt, etc.
    I did find a dealer listing a 08 7300 for $429.

    Do I look for a 7.2 FX? not eat lunch for a few weeks and go with the 7.3? Will it hold up off pavement?
    Do I wait for the 2011 7300s since I can not find one in stock?
    So many bikes, so many decisions!
    Regards,
    Ward

    2010 White Trek 7300

  10. #10
    aka Phil Jungels Wanderer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    North Aurora, IL
    My Bikes
    Road & Hybrid
    Posts
    5,467
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If it was me, I'd opt for the 7.3, as I think that's the sweet spot in that line..... And those tires will be fine, the suspension doesn't dictate that.

    Yes, Trek calls it a flat bar road bike, other manufacturers call them "performance hybrids."

    If you really like it - go for it. Are they discounting the 7.3 because it's so close to new model intros?

    "Retirement is the best job I ever had!" Me, 2009


    Specialized Crosstrail Sport - '08
    Nishiki Sport - misappropriated from my youngest son (circa 1984)
    Marin Stinson - misappropriated by my youngest grandson - '01
    "The Beast" - 1990 Schwinn Airdyne (in the basement for winter torture)

  11. #11
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    23
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    One dealer, over the phone, has a 2009 that he will add a bar and adjustable stem to for $550.
    My local shop who has been helping me a lot, offered $15 discount plus stem, the set up I tried last night. They will not discount further as it is considered a carry over. They do give $10 credit towards a different saddle plus 10% discount on all accessories day of purchase. They also include 4 (I think it was 4) free tune ups, saying it was a $400 value. That sounds to me like extended warranties, which I never buy.

    Do bikes need tune ups or check ups that often?

    I was going to sell my Navigator to help offset the cost but the wife suggested I keep the Navigator for those times I do want to go off road and keep the FX for road use.

    I think I am down to what color and which dealer will give me better service. The 2009 is 35 mins away and the 2010 is 10 mins away.
    Regards,
    Ward

    2010 White Trek 7300

  12. #12
    aka Phil Jungels Wanderer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    North Aurora, IL
    My Bikes
    Road & Hybrid
    Posts
    5,467
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Without a discount, they should offer the stem and seat for free........ $15 off is almost an insult..... MHO

    Tell him to be competitive with the other guy, if he wants your business...... The guy with the 2009 looks like he wants you to buy from him.

    A close dealer in nice - but he's got to be competitive.

    Tune ups - minor adjustments are easy - and once broke in, adjustments don't need to be done often. If you don't turn your own wrenches - 4 years of tuneups would be nice to get. Is there a 4 year warrantee incluced with those tuneups?

    "Retirement is the best job I ever had!" Me, 2009


    Specialized Crosstrail Sport - '08
    Nishiki Sport - misappropriated from my youngest son (circa 1984)
    Marin Stinson - misappropriated by my youngest grandson - '01
    "The Beast" - 1990 Schwinn Airdyne (in the basement for winter torture)

  13. #13
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    23
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I believe it is just a "stop in and we will check it out" type of thing. No warrantee and I believe she said 4 times the first year.

    I like to take care of my own stuff so would rather learn to do it myself.

    I tallied the cost with discounts, accessory discounts and tax and the two shops are within $50. I will go after the closer shop again after work. If that does not work, I have another shop, some distance, where I bought my Navigators. They originally recommended the FX.
    I will go with the best of three!
    Regards,
    Ward

    2010 White Trek 7300

  14. #14
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    23
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    After visiting 3 shops, reviewing your suggestions and comments and taking several test rides, I chose the Trek 7300.
    I was close to buying the 7.3 FX but was concerned it would be too much of a road bike for my use. I agreed with the comments that the suspension fork of the 7100 to 7200 was too much weight and too soft so I found a 7300. It still has a suspension fork but a lot less travel and is a lot stiffer than the other suspension forks but lighter. The SPA suspension dampens large bumps but does not smooth out pavement cracks and other small chatter. I looked for but did not see any suspension movement from my power pedaling.

    Overall the 7300 is lighter than the lower models and about 8lb lighter than my Navigator. Components seem decent, everything worked smoothly and it was not so expensive that I won't mind upgrading it if I if I keep up with my biking plans. If I find myself wanting to do regular 20 mile plus rides I can always move to the FX or a road bike later.

    I did a 14 mile ride on it yesterday, my longest ride since my twenties. I could have gone longer but ran out of time. I found myself averaging around 14 mph where as on my Navigator I averaged 10 mph. As I get more fit and lose some weight (lost 11 lbs so far on WW, one of the reasons I am getting back into biking regulary) I hope to increase that speed and my endurance.

    A question about seats. How much time should you take in deciding a seat is the right one or you should move to a different style, padding, whatever for more comfort? My rear is sore after that ride. I do need to work on the handlebar adjustments and my posture but was wondering if I should think about a seat upgrade or bike shorts.

    Thanks for all you help!
    Regards,
    Ward

    2010 White Trek 7300

  15. #15
    aka Phil Jungels Wanderer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    North Aurora, IL
    My Bikes
    Road & Hybrid
    Posts
    5,467
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    At least give the seat a couple hundred miles, to see if you two get along.

    Also, you might want to do a bit of adjusting to get a little more weight on your arms, which will take a little off your butt. You need a little forward lean, which is also one of the differences between the two bikes. Get some bar ends, for more hand positions, and a Mountain Mirrycle mirror will let you see what's sneaking up behind you.

    MHO - I think you did the right thing on your choice of forks. That elastomer will be a better choice, between the two. Another personal opinion, since the seat suspension is adjustable, tighten it up to the maximum, as softer is not really better. Keep those tires pumped up, and get a patch kit and pump, for when you need it. You'll be glad you did.

    Congrats on the 7300 - now get out and put some miles on it........ it is a nice bike.
    Last edited by Wanderer; 06-21-10 at 07:24 AM.

    "Retirement is the best job I ever had!" Me, 2009


    Specialized Crosstrail Sport - '08
    Nishiki Sport - misappropriated from my youngest son (circa 1984)
    Marin Stinson - misappropriated by my youngest grandson - '01
    "The Beast" - 1990 Schwinn Airdyne (in the basement for winter torture)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •