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  1. #1
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    Red face newbie to the forums and bikes. did i make the right choice?

    Firstly hi I am a very short female looking for first time advice for a first time biker. I just reciently purchased a Schwinn Sporterra Sport XS for myself and love it. i got a great deal on it and am pleased.

    However, I am going to be commuting on this bike often. The bike has quick release everything and was wondering if locking the rear wheel, even though its a quick release is smart?


    also, i have found no reviews of my bike and i was wondering what the common problems and issues are with the bike. I am out of shape and was looking to have biking as a bonus to working out. was getting a hybrid the right choice? should i look to 'upgrade' to a road bike down the future? thanks!

  2. #2
    Member lansingmike's Avatar
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    Welcome to the forums! We have a couple of things in common, I have new around here and I am also out of shape and getting a hybrid. Well, I have a hybrid, but it is an old bike and I am getting some updated technology. If you like the bike you have a good bike, your review is the one that counts.

    Shimano Alivio and EF50 components the same as are used on the Trek 7.2 FX. That is neither good nor bad per se, but it is always a good sign when your components are found on other bikes.

    As to locking the wheel: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r6xnkEkP2WY

    If you are commuting, a head and tail light would probably be useful.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by lansingmike View Post
    Welcome to the forums! We have a couple of things in common, I have new around here and I am also out of shape and getting a hybrid. Well, I have a hybrid, but it is an old bike and I am getting some updated technology. If you like the bike you have a good bike, your review is the one that counts.

    Shimano Alivio and EF50 components the same as are used on the Trek 7.2 FX. That is neither good nor bad per se, but it is always a good sign when your components are found on other bikes.

    As to locking the wheel: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r6xnkEkP2WY

    If you are commuting, a head and tail light would probably be useful.
    thanks for the vid!! i have purchased head and tail lights and im very excited about using them i actually own 2 u locks (one crappy one good) and one small cable so i use all of that and take apart my front wheel when locking up..

    is there any tips on how to make the ride on my hybrid more rigerous? i go on the grass quite often so changing the tires to road bike tires is a no, right?

    and why are hybrid bikes also called fitness bikes if they are more comfortable?

    thanks!

  4. #4
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    IMAG0088..jpg

    this is it. i really love it.

  5. #5
    Senior Member AdelaaR's Avatar
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    Nice bike. Congratz!

  6. #6
    Senior Member xoxoxoxoLive's Avatar
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    Go Schwinn ! Nice looking bike, welcome to the forum....: ) Richard

  7. #7
    aka Phil Jungels Wanderer's Avatar
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    By "going on the grass" do you mean mowed lawns? If so, any tires will be fine.

    And, any bike you like, ius the right bike - enjoy it!

    "Retirement is the best job I ever had!" Me, 2009


    Specialized Crosstrail Sport - '08
    Nishiki Sport - misappropriated from my youngest son (circa 1984)
    Marin Stinson - misappropriated by my youngest grandson - '01
    "The Beast" - 1990 Schwinn Airdyne (in the basement for winter torture)

  8. #8
    Member lansingmike's Avatar
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    Those are good questions you have and I will try to answer them the best I can.

    Firstly, I am not certain what you asking with 'rigerous', to me that is like asking how to make the bike stiffer.

    A bike with what are typically considered 'road' tires would slip on grass when turning, when stopping, and/or when starting. There are as many varieties of bike tires as there are grass though, so sometimes desire creates new abilities for parts otherwise made. Typically, to ride on grass you should have some tread on your tires to better grip the grass. There do exist, and you really should have this sort, tires with both a tread and a center flat bead. Such a tire will provide a smooth roll on the road, and a no-slip ride offroad.

    As to why some hybrid bikes are called fitness bikes - any bike with the ability to roll on road and off road is a hybrid. Any sort of physical activity that can, or could, be aerobic, is a fitness activity. Bicycle manufacturing companies try to make bicycle labels meet a purchasers intentions. Customer thinks, "I need to get in shape, biking would be a good way to do that.", and the customer heads to the store where he may come across a fitness bike. At that point of sale, reality can sometimes be suspended to the extent that the buyer forgets that he/she must move the pedals on the bike in every case, and buys the 'fitness' bike, probably for a higher price than an equal bike not directly called a 'fitness' bike. Another reason to call a bike a 'fitness' bike is to reflect an alternative means to serve a single purpose. You can outfit some hybrid bikes with very skinny road slicks and make that hybrid a slow road bike.

    The whole bicycle marketing game serves the singular purpose of getting consumers to buy a new bike. After you buy a bike and start riding it, the true purpose of the bike becomes apparent in the relationship you develop with your bicycle. If you love your bicycle you will keep it clean and oiled. If you love your bike and bike riding you might even take your bike to work. If you really, really, really, love your bicycle and bike riding, you will take it shopping for smaller clothes after a while.

    Your bike looks really nice. Another aspect of loving your bicycle and bike riding is that you love your bike so much you buy it presents. Upgrading can become a fever. Not that you should worry about that, but you should buy your bike a kickstand to keep dirt out of the gears and to keep the metal parts shiny and painted longer.

  9. #9
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    Stay on established trails. In most cases, riding on grass is a violation of the off-road bicyclists' code of ethics.

    http://www.imba.com/about/trail_rules.html

  10. #10
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    sorry for the late reply. wow so much info here thanks guys!

    actually i bought my bike to replace my car for anything within 5-7 miles from my house one way, im trying to conserve gas. i use it for groceries, school, and getting to public transit stations (with indoor bike racks), and just for plain fun.

    i asked about going on grass because we have a public park with grass (i asked the adminstrators there if i can ride on it) thats not not very well mowed, dirt feilds, and fine gravel trails. i should probably stick with the hybrid tires, no?

    haha and i bet modding a bike is cheaper than modding my car. i know that route well with my darn v8 lol. my modded camaro takes up too much $$ to drive to small errands.

    so.. another question is, if i want to get groceries, whats better? a basket? saddle bags? my bike is small so im not sure what is most practical. thanks all

  11. #11
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    Your bike is indeed a small one which might make it difficult to to mount a standard rear rack. A front basket can be useful, but the amount of groceries you can carry in it will be limited. Seatpost mounted rear racks also offer somewhat limited carrying capacity but would be easy to install. I'd suggest the type that can carry panniers (saddlebags). A front basket coupled with a seatpost mounted rear rack w/ panniers will allow you to carry a decent amount of groceries.

    There are some lightweight bicycle trailers with rather limited capacity which aren't very expensive. Something like that might suit your needs.

  12. #12
    Senior Member meanwhile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ryonyanko View Post

    However, I am going to be commuting on this bike often. The bike has quick release everything and was wondering if locking the rear wheel, even though its a quick release is smart?
    Smart question: it's a good idea to replace the quick release for the wheels and seat post with locking skewers

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bicycle...ocking_skewers

    You should be able to get a full set of the "Pentagonal key skewers" for less than $30... In fact:

    http://www.amazon.com/Sunlite-Lock-n...321837&sr=8-11

    also, i have found no reviews of my bike and i was wondering what the common problems and issues are with the bike.
    Reviews don't tell you that sort of thing. What they mostly tell you is the maker's PR budget.

    I am out of shape and was looking to have biking as a bonus to working out. was getting a hybrid the right choice? should i look to 'upgrade' to a road bike down the future? thanks!
    A hybrid is an excellent choice. Racing bikes are fun but they're less versatile and less stable than a hybrid.

    actually i bought my bike to replace my car for anything within 5-7 miles from my house one way, im trying to conserve gas. i use it for groceries, school, and getting to public transit stations (with indoor bike racks), and just for plain fun...

    so.. another question is, if i want to get groceries, whats better? a basket? saddle bags?
    For a 5 mile ride with a moderate amount of shopping I'd use a cheap backpack. If you want to carry masses of stuff then get a rear rack and a front one.- If you want tyres that are good on grass and fast on the road, then buy Marathon Duremes. They're not cheap but they should last you for several years.


    Other suggestions:

    - Fit Ergon grips (do a forum search on them)

    - Expect to get a puncture sometime. So carry tyre levers, a spare inner tube and a pump on rides that are too long to push the bike home from. However, with good tyres like Duremes punctures should be rare - especially if you buy a tyre sealant like "Sludge" or "Slime"

    - If you want tyres that are good on grass and fast on the road, then buy Marathon Duremes. They're not cheap but they should last you for several years.
    Last edited by meanwhile; 07-16-10 at 06:19 PM.

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