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  1. #1
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    Fuji Absolute 1.0 2010 vs Trek 7.5 FX 2010

    Hey there everyone, first post here.

    Basically i have always had a mountain bike and have been riding it on the roads everywhere recently because i have realized i love cycling and the fitness it brings whilst the football season is down!

    So basically i have some money, up to about 800 quid, burning a whole in my pocket and i would like to invest in a new hybrid. These 2 bikes are the ones which have caught my eye because for me to justify spending that much money the bike has to look good as well. Have you had any personal experiences riding the bikes? Im particularly interested in information about the Fuji as i prefer it to the trek.

    The Fuji - http://www.evanscycles.com/products/...-bike-ec022192


    The trek - http://www.evanscycles.com/products/...query=7.5%20fx

    If any of you could suggest good looking and good riding hybrids to me that would be ideal. Thanks for your time!

  2. #2
    aka Phil Jungels Wanderer's Avatar
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    Certainly nothing wrong with the Fuji, as they are usually a good buy for the money.

    You gotta buy the one that fits you the best, and trips your trigger.

    "Retirement is the best job I ever had!" Me, 2009


    Specialized Crosstrail Sport - '08
    Nishiki Sport - misappropriated from my youngest son (circa 1984)
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    "The Beast" - 1990 Schwinn Airdyne (in the basement for winter torture)

  3. #3
    Sumerian Street Rider khutch's Avatar
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    I have the 2009 Absolute 1.0 and I was going to say that it is the same as the 2010 except that the newer model has disk brakes and maybe some minor frame geometry changes. It appears from your link that the 2010 UK version has V brakes instead of disk brakes like the 2010 US version. So what I have is quite comparable to the bike you would buy, if you go with the Fuji.

    I really like the bike. I just started riding again last summer after about a 10 year gap. I bought a Dahon folder to replace the shuttle service between my train station and work when my employer canceled it. The Dahon is pretty nice but when I bought the Fuji this spring I was surprised at how much difference there is. The Dahon is nimble to the point of being twitchy, the Fuji is just nimble. The Dahon seemed fast yet I can easily go faster on the Fuji. The brakes are excellent. The tires seem narrow yet they handle mild off road riding (dirt/gravel/turf) surprisingly well. The 105 transmission is the best I have ever owned, though I have not owned that many. It shifts smoothly and indexes accurately. The gear range goes decently high. I was worried that the low end was not low enough. So far that has not been an issue. The local paved bike trail has a section with short, steep (23%) grades and the low gear on the Fuji is plenty low enough for those.

    I don't like the handle bar, yet the great majority of hybrids have flat bars as well and it is the flat bar, not this particular flat bar, that I do not like so the Fuji is the same as most of the other models in this regard. Being a mountain biker I am sure you appreciate how much control a flat bar gives you off road. On a long road ride (and I do very little of road riding) I find my hands going numb after about 25 miles and there are no alternate hand positions available to relieve that. I tried putting a stem extension on the bike to raise the bars and that helped a little because it gives a more upright position with less pressure on your hands. Not nearly enough though, and when you are forced to fight a headwind the original height is too high, the raised position is worse. I tried some drop bar ends and did not like them. Right now I have switched to a butterfly trekking bar and that seems promising. Other options I have seen people use are regular drop bars (requires new shifters and brake levers because of the difference in bar diameter), aero bars added to the drop bars, Titec J or H bars, and there are other bars that can be used, some compatible with the stock shifter/brake lever diameter while others are not.

    Changes I have made are 32 mm Hutchinson Acrobat tires, mostly because my surname is Hutchinson and what a hoot to have your name on your tires! I put Kool Stop Salmon brake pads on because of all the praise they get for their wet weather performance. I hardly ever ride in wet weather though and they are no better than the excellent stock pads in dry weather. As it turned out my Dahon needed new pads this spring so the stock Fuji pads went on the Dahon and the Kool Stops were not a waste of money after all. I added the normal stuff like a computer and lights. I put a Topeak rear rack and trunk bag on the bike. The frame eyelets made this an easy job. Just last weekend I got cycling shoes and clipless pedals, the beginning of another new adventure as I have never used them previously. The stock pedals and toe clips are quite nice though, I just wanted to try clipless.

    It is a very nice bike, I have no regrets at all over buying the Fuji. If you have specific questions, I will try to answer them. I have no experience with the Trek although there are plenty of owners here who can sing its praises.

    Ken

  4. #4
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    i have a fuji absolute 2.0 and chose it over the trek 7.2 fx. my experience will analogously apply to your 1.0 vs 7.5 comparison. if i could do it all over again i would take the trek. you may not agree with my reasons because you seem to have different uses.

    (1) FIT! the trek has its handlebars 2-3" higher than the fuji if both bikes are set to a 10 degree stem angle. i think the handlebars of the fuji are too low. makes it harder to brace yourself back when going down a hill. this can be scary. my braking technique is good so low handlebars isn't an issue but higher handlebars allow you to brace yourself better. my lbs did not properly fit me, sold me my first bike with a 40 degree rise because the fuji has an adjustable stem. your bike should have a rise of no more than 10-15 degrees. it's better to get a different geometry (trek!) that places the handlebar higher than a weird stem or whatever SINCE you are buying a brand new bike where you shouldn't have to compromise right from the start. when i put the 10 degree 100 mm stem, i notice more stable steering which is good for the road. it's not that the trek has high handlebars but that the fuji has low handlebars. depending on the person, this can also cause back pain so check your fit!

    (2) fuji probably has 14 mm rims. the largest tire size you can fit, *conservatively* is 28 mm. it has a range of 23-28 mm. i want something wider like 35 mm or 37 mm. a more reasonable and common range for hybrids is 28-37 mm tires. wider tires are cushier, corner better, and i don't notice any difference at all in rolling resistance from a 35 to a 28 (but a big difference in smoothness). i was a newbie so i didn't know these things. this is probably not an issue to you who rides smooth roads. i ride roads with uneven paving, damaged, or has potholes. for me, 23-28 mm range of tires + very low handlebars makes a half assed road bike. if i was going to do this i'd rather get a real road bike with dropped bars that isn't much lower but offers more hand positions.

    (3) your fuji stem may have aluminum bolts. ask the lbs to dial your fit and then swap your stem for a non-adjustable one. if you do want adjustable, at least tell them to give you steel bolts if it's not there already. make sure that your adjustable stem is not squeaking or creaking like mine was when it was new from the shop. have lbs adjust or replace it.

    besides the tire and the handlebar height, i do like the fuji. the frame is durable. i don't think the fuji is a hybrid. it is a lat bar road bike. the the trek is a true hybrid. nothing wrong with either but buyer beware! if the above two issues are not a problem, go with the fuji. fuji customer service is very good imo. if i could do it all over again, i'd go with trek's geometry and fit. the components don't mean jack if the fit is poor and you have back pain and hand pain from riding a poorly fit bike or you're afraid of going over the bars.

    i've added riser bars 2" which don't seem to do much and wear gloves to alleviate my issues. i like my fuji and will use it as a back up bike once i get my new one (whenever i find something that i like - can't be another hybrid since i already have one).

    when you test ride your bike, make sure your lbs properly inflates it, adjusts the stem angle to your fit, and that your seat is raised high until you can barely balance on your tippy toes (you proly knew that). i was a noob who didn't know any better and my lbs didn't do any adjustments. that's why i go to another shop from now on. fit is most important by far!
    Last edited by common man; 07-01-10 at 08:23 AM.

  5. #5
    Sumerian Street Rider khutch's Avatar
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    It is true that the Fuji has a relatively low handlebar position, more like the top of a road bike's drop bars. Some test riding will tell you if that is a problem for you or not. If it is and you like the Fuji better than the Trek otherwise there are solutions. Neither my Fuji nor the ones currently sold in the UK (according to that Evan's Cycles link) have adjustable stems so there is no concern about aluminum bolts there. My Fuji certainly does have 14 mm rims and the conservative charts that you find do say 28 mm wide tires, max. Most people say you can go a size or two above that though. I am currently running 32 mm tires, as I said, without any problems. I suspect a 38 mm tire would work well too if you don't need to run it at the max sidewall pressure (and most of us don't have to, we just do that because it is the conventional wisdom).

    Ken

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by khutch View Post
    It is true that the Fuji has a relatively low handlebar position, more like the top of a road bike's drop bars. Some test riding will tell you if that is a problem for you or not. Ken
    you are right. too bad i was a noob and didn't know that 40 degree stem angle was unusual (as it was set up on the shop floor). i couldn't tell in a small parking lot ride when i was just eager to get my first bike and with "deore" components. but it's fine, i've gotten used to the fuji.

  7. #7
    Sumerian Street Rider khutch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by common man View Post
    you are right. too bad i was a noob and didn't know that 40 degree stem angle was unusual (as it was set up on the shop floor). i couldn't tell in a small parking lot ride when i was just eager to get my first bike and with "deore" components. but it's fine, i've gotten used to the fuji.
    You could get one of these. I got one to experiment with the flat bar that came with the Fuji. It helped, just not enough, and I am still using it with the trekking bar, for now. I think it works better than a steeply angled stem, but I could be wrong about that.

    Ken

  8. #8
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    Cheers for the input guys, i think im going to go with the Trek though. I do prefer the look and some of the things mentioned such as handle bar position puts me off as a bit of a biking noob. Im 6'1 and the shop did'nt have a 20 inch frame so they are shipping down a 22.5 Inch for me to test ride, im hoping this wont be too big, i am long in the leg though.

    Really looking forward to getting a decent bike and taking it for a spin, my mountain bike is good but it feels like your fighting against it constantly, and it weighs about as much as i do haha. Really really like the looks of the Trek as well, im hearing all kinds of good stuff about it as well so ye, cheers for the input lads and ladies!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hollisio View Post
    Im 6'1 and the shop did'nt have a 20 inch frame so they are shipping down a 22.5 Inch for me to test ride, im hoping this wont be too big, i am long in the leg though.
    absolutely make sure that it is the right fit! do not compromise in the slightest. a compromise is for someone who purchased a second hand bike or got one handed down...not someone who is buying a bike brand new ($800+ at that!). my local shop gives you a free fitting where they sit you on the trainer and have you pedal and then they'll adjust the saddle and maybe swap the stem.

    remember, your stem should be no less than 100 mm and no more than 130 mm. since you're on the road and you gotta watch for traffic, a stem less than 100 will be twitchy. make sure that the stem angle is no more than 10 degrees. a stem more than 10 degrees or outside of 100-120 IMO means that the frame itself was not a good enough fit to begin with.

    do not compromise in the fit in any way! doesn't matter how good the deal is. if you have to drive 45 minutes away to find a shop that has your size, so be it. if your bike doesn't fit, you'll be held back. you'll want to pedal harder or go longer but your back and hands will hurt and you'll regret having unloaded 800 bucks.

    remember to have the shop properly adjust the bike for you before you do a test ride...

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