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  1. #1
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    Old man and son need advice.

    I, somewhat urgently, need help in making the right selection for a couple of bikes I'm prepared to buy for my son and I.

    After a ton of online research, we have settled on Trek as a brand ... our individual specs and needs are as follows:

    Me
    1) 57 years old, 6 ft, 190 lbs
    2) will be using on pavement 50% of the time, gravel 25%, off-road 25%
    3) my area is hilly terrain with some steep inclines (Ozark Mountains)
    4) maximum price $750

    Son
    1) 24 yrs old, 5-11, 225 lbs
    2) pavement 75%, light off-road 25%
    3) his area is less hilly
    4) maximum price $600

    We have been to our local Trek dealer and test-driven several bikes ... the store is new and they have been somewhat helpful, but not to the extent that they have made us confident in choosing the right bikes. Basically, they have recommended the GF Bodega for my son and the 4300 for me ... we both have also considered the 7300. We are relatively new to biking and all we basically know about Trek is what we have gathered online and from the bike shop ... specs for each of the bikes becomes very confusing to us after a while.

    Can anyone help us make the right selection? One question I have in particular is about the GF Collection ... it doesn't seem to have caught on in our area ... research shows that there are a lot of recent changes with Gary and Trek ... should that be a concern in buying a GF bike now?

    Anxious to pull the trigger and get to riding, but dazed and confused about hybrids versus true mountain bikes and all of the various models and specs, we are

    Bill and son
    Last edited by Honest Bill; 02-24-11 at 04:43 PM.

  2. #2
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    I have one question before I can make a recommendation. what do you mean by light off road exactly? Are you talking crushed limestone rail to trails or do you mean actual mountain bike singletrack trails going over logs, roots and whatnot?
    2013 Cannondale CAADX Ultegra Disc
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  3. #3
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    Ok so I looked up the bikes that were recommended to you. Let me start by saying that I am a big fan of the dual sport bike. I have a Scott sportster which is the same type of bike as the Gary fisher that was recommended to your son.
    As for your son I think that type of bike is a great recommendation but would strongly urge that he steps up to the katai. The katai has a lockout suspension front fork. The bodega does not. When he is riding on the road he will want this feature so that he is not bobbing up and down going up hills.
    For you I would recommend the same bike or step up to the utopia. It has the same frame with better components. The store recommend a hardtail mountain bike. Since you ate doing most of you riding on road I would not go with a straight up mountain bike. The dual sport bike like the katai and utopia has gearing that you will find very useful. It has low gears close to a mountain bike that will help you get up the steep hills and it has the higher gearing closer to a road bike so that you will not run out of gears on the road like you would with a mountain bike. The dual sport bikes also have 700c wheels which are the size of road bike wheels which will give you more speed.

    If you are not doing anything that requires front suspension then one of the trek fx's would be a good option also.

    I hope this helps.
    Last edited by Sportster2009; 02-25-11 at 08:59 AM.
    2013 Cannondale CAADX Ultegra Disc
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  4. #4
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    I am looking at the same bikes for similar riding situations. You definitely need to move up to the bikes that have a lock-out front suspension given the amount of time you will spend on pavement. That would be the Kaitai in the dual sport. It is a little over your budget, but not much. For the old guy if that 25% off road is national forest single track type rides in the Ozarks than the 4300 would probably be better. Still need the lock-out for the pavement riding. If you think your off road riding will be easier then the dual sport utopia would be nice. It comes with a little bit lower geared chainrings(48/36/26 vs 48/38/28 on the Kaitai). That will help with your older knees and steep mountain grades.

    If you would consider other than Trek, take a close look at the Giant Roam 1. It is a good combination of components for the price.

  5. #5
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    Just the kind of analytical help I needed.

    Thanks, Sportster2009.

    Follow-up questions:

    1) gearing with a GF hybrid won't be a problem for me? we do have some pretty steep hills where I live ... Eureka Springs in the Ozark Mountains of NW Arkansas ... Fayetteville, where my son lives and will be riding most of the time, is more rolling and flater

    2) the wheels on the GF hybrids are larger than what are on the Trek true mountain bikes, like the 4300? if so, that makes it easier for speed on pavement? however, I don't see speed being really improtant to me

    3) "trek dc's"?

    As far as off-road, most of mine will be on county gravel roads and bike trails (not paved and through the woods) in our parks ... though you can get agressive on our bike trails (big rocks, trees, downhill), that's not what I'll be doing ... mostly staying on the trails, which can get sloppy at times but are typical of mountain trails for the most part.

    Thanks,

    Bill

  6. #6
    Senior Member AdelaaR's Avatar
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    Did you consider something basic like a Trek 7.2fx or similar?
    It is very hard to recommend bikes to people since there are so many varieties and a lot of it is personal taste.

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    Bill not a problem. We enjoy talking about these types of questions on here...

    Quote Originally Posted by Honest Bill View Post
    Thanks, Sportster2009.

    Follow-up questions:

    1) gearing with a GF hybrid won't be a problem for me? we do have some pretty steep hills where I live ... Eureka Springs in the Ozark Mountains of NW Arkansas ... Fayetteville, where my son lives and will be riding most of the time, is more rolling and flater
    Bill I don't think it would be a problem for you. The gearing on the sportster using 'touring' gearing. Your easiest gear to pedal in will be 28 - 32. That is quite an easy gear. Best thing to do really though is to goto your local bike store, and hopefully there is a hill near the store that you can ride up with the GF and then compare it to the mountain bike. You will have an easier gear on the mountain bike, but the GF 'granny' gear is very low. I live in western PA so I understand the concern with hills. Keep in mind also that as you ride you will get stronger and will probably not even need the easiest gears. You can really build up some good leg strength quickly.

    Quote Originally Posted by Honest Bill View Post
    2) the wheels on the GF hybrids are larger than what are on the Trek true mountain bikes, like the 4300? if so, that makes it easier for speed on pavement? however, I don't see speed being really improtant to me
    Yes, the wheels on the GF dual sport bikes have 700c wheels vs 26inch wheels that are on the 4300 mountain bike. The 700c wheels will be faster.

    Quote Originally Posted by Honest Bill View Post
    3) "trek dc's"?
    Sorry, that was a typo. My phone auto corrected my spelling. I meant Trek FX's. They are Trek's hybrid's that are more of a road bike with flat bars as opposed to the drop bars on traditional road bikes. This type of bike would be a good option if the trails you were riding on were crushed limestone type trails, but if it's single track, I wouldn't take this bike on that. Also, these you will not get as low of gearing(easy gears) as you will on the dual sport bikes. So if that is a major concern of yours this is probably not the best option.

    Quote Originally Posted by Honest Bill View Post
    As far as off-road, most of mine will be on county gravel roads and bike trails (not paved and through the woods) in our parks ... though you can get agressive on our bike trails (big rocks, trees, downhill), that's not what I'll be doing ... mostly staying on the trails, which can get sloppy at times but are typical of mountain trails for the most part.
    It really sounds to me like the dual sport is the way to go for you. I love mine. They are extremely versatile bikes. Great for the type of riding you are describing.
    I know you said you were set on Trek as a brand, but in case you changed your mind, your other options in the 'dual sport' type of bike are, in no particular order:
    Scott Sportster
    Cannondale Quick CX
    Jamis Allegro X
    Speicalized Crosstrail
    Giant Roam

    I'm sure there are others I'm not thinking of also. Best advice you can get though comes down to fit. Make sure you ride the bike before you buy it. If it doesn't fit good and feel good when you ride it, you will regret any bike you get.

    Be sure to post back with an update on what you decided to do.

    Take Care,
    Mike
    2013 Cannondale CAADX Ultegra Disc
    2013 Specialized Carve Comp 29er

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    I post on a lot of different forums for various kinds of advice, most of which are very helpful, but you guys are right up there at the top ... I really appreciate everyone taking the time to help this biking wannabe sort this out.

    For the old guy if that 25% off road is national forest single track type rides in the Ozarks than the 4300 would probably be better.
    Yes, these trails, I believe, are what you refer to as "single-track" ... would one option be to get the GF hybrid and have a second set of fat tires to pop on when doing these trails, as opposed to getting the 4300?

    I've got some more homework to do ... several other bikes have been suggested ... test rides seem to be in order, too ... not sure some of these bikes are available in our area, though ... we've been to the Specialized store (our second choice) and Cannondale, but Trek caught our fancy primarily because of the GF bikes and the fact that we just had a good feel about their store and service ... good test ride, too.

    Bill

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Honest Bill View Post
    Yes, these trails, I believe, are what you refer to as "single-track" ... would one option be to get the GF hybrid and have a second set of fat tires to pop on when doing these trails, as opposed to getting the 4300?
    Yes, although you will not be able to get a tire as fat as a true mountain bike tire on. The best for the woods, I've found for my sportster are cyclocross tires.
    I believe the type of trail riding you are referring to still falls into the 'light' trail category. So the dual sports will work great for that. The mountain bike will be better in the woods. The dual sport will be fine in the woods, not as good as the mountain bike, but will be much better on the road. So I think it just comes down to what you value more.

    Quote Originally Posted by Honest Bill View Post
    I've got some more homework to do ... several other bikes have been suggested ... test rides seem to be in order, too ... not sure some of these bikes are available in our area, though ... we've been to the Specialized store (our second choice) and Cannondale, but Trek caught our fancy primarily because of the GF bikes and the fact that we just had a good feel about their store and service ... good test ride, too.
    I think after you test ride more bikes, and especially back to back a mountain bike vs a dual sport bike, it will become more evident to you what you should be concentrating on in your search.

    Mike
    2013 Cannondale CAADX Ultegra Disc
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  10. #10
    Senior Member xoxoxoxoLive's Avatar
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    I would look at the Giant Roam 1 for both of you, should do all you want has lockout front suspension, disk brakes, 700 x 40
    tires, made for street or trail riding. Check out the specs. You could also change tires to a more aggressive style for light
    XC riding, or go narrower for street riding if needed. A lot of bike for the price, 579.00 Dollars at my local Giant Dealer. http://www.giant-bicycles.com/en-us/...11/7244/43949/ Richard

  11. #11
    we be rollin' hybridbkrdr's Avatar
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    If you're THAT confused about bikes, I would just get a hybrid. The last time I did research, I liked the GT Traffic 3.0

    But, seriously, I don't think you sound like someone who knows bikes at all. I've ridden bikes for years and years, all kinds of styles and can tell you I can just sit on one and tell you if I want to buy it. So, I would go to Wal-Mart, get a cheap one and get some experience before you can REALLY choose a bike you want.

    Excuse me for the rude tone of the message. I'd rather be blunt than to dress it up and avoid the truth.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by hybridbkrdr View Post
    If you're THAT confused about bikes, I would just get a hybrid. The last time I did research, I liked the GT Traffic 3.0

    But, seriously, I don't think you sound like someone who knows bikes at all. I've ridden bikes for years and years, all kinds of styles and can tell you I can just sit on one and tell you if I want to buy it. So, I would go to Wal-Mart, get a cheap one and get some experience before you can REALLY choose a bike you want.

    Excuse me for the rude tone of the message. I'd rather be blunt than to dress it up and avoid the truth.
    What an absolutely arrogant post! This is the type of post you will find in the road bike forum and is exactly why I don't frequent that forum much anymore.
    Bill do not listen to this. Just because you are requesting help in deciding what type of bike best suits your needs, doesn't mean you should buy a walmart bike. That is simply absurd. Bill you are doing the right thing researching what type of bike to buy and test riding them. You will find the right bike.
    2013 Cannondale CAADX Ultegra Disc
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    Agreed bill. I'm interested in the same few bikes. I want to hear your ride reports to help me decide.

  14. #14
    we be rollin' hybridbkrdr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sportster2009 View Post
    What an absolutely arrogant post! This is the type of post you will find in the road bike forum and is exactly why I don't frequent that forum much anymore.
    Bill do not listen to this. Just because you are requesting help in deciding what type of bike best suits your needs, doesn't mean you should buy a walmart bike. That is simply absurd. Bill you are doing the right thing researching what type of bike to buy and test riding them. You will find the right bike.
    Well, it sounds arrogant because many people don't speak their minds. The guy just said, he test drove several bikes and couldn't tell which one he wanted. So, what does that mean? It means he has no freakin' experience. Do you want me to beat around the bush and pretend that he knows what to choose? Look, you people are going to recommend an $800 bike to someone who has no experience. When he does have experience he'll end up spending another $800 to get the bike he really wanted in the first place. Duh.

    If you test drive a bicycle and can't tell if you want it or not, you have little or no experience.

  15. #15
    Senior Member xoxoxoxoLive's Avatar
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    Be iNce !

    Quote Originally Posted by hybridbkrdr View Post
    If you're THAT confused about bikes, I would just get a hybrid. The last time I did research, I liked the GT Traffic 3.0

    But, seriously, I don't think you sound like someone who knows bikes at all. I've ridden bikes for years and years, all kinds of styles and can tell you I can just sit on one and tell you if I want to buy it. So, I would go to Wal-Mart, get a cheap one and get some experience before you can REALLY choose a bike you want.

    Excuse me for the rude tone of the message. I'd rather be blunt than to dress it up and avoid the truth.
    Very rude post, ( My Guess is you ride an over priced __________ ) ..but don't start bashing Waly Mart Bikes.

    or the original OP ! He seemed sincere, and you sound arrogant and selfish ! Sorry if that offends you, but I

    call it, like it reads... Richard

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    Boy, I seem to have started a spirited "discussion" ... let me say that regardless of tone, I appreciate everyone's help with this semi-head first dive into biking.

    But, seriously, I don't think you sound like someone who knows bikes at all.
    It means he has no freakin' experience.
    If you test drive a bicycle and can't tell if you want it or not, you have little or no experience.
    Admittedly, these comments are absolutely spot on when it comes to me ... other than a Kabuki road bike I had as a kid and a Bridgestone MB-3 mountain bike I bought in the mid-90's and never rode (was playing a lot of basketball at the time and tore some stuff in my foot right the same week I bought the bike and never used it when I was good to go again several months later ... the bike still resides in my basement ... never ridden ... absolute mint, but no suspension), I know virtually nothing about biking, especially from a hands-on experience perspective.

    When he does have experience he'll end up spending another $800 to get the bike he really wanted in the first place.
    This is precisely why I am taking the time to thoroughly research this and seek the advice of experienced guys like you guys, so I can reduce the possibility of making a bad choice and having to buy another bike. As opposed to learning on an inexpensive "big box store" bike (which I have considered), I'd rather jump in with a better bike ... I'm willing to risk the extra money as long as I do the homework to make the best decision possible.

    He seemed sincere
    Very much so ... I'm just a regular guy doing his due diligence before getting involved with an activity that will hopefully prove to be a big part of my exercise regimen and allow me to enjoy the beauty of our area in a different kind of way (I'm a big hiker).

    I'm interested in the same few bikes. I want to hear your ride reports to help me decide.
    When I make my choice and get some experience, I will definitely post the results here to help you and others ... I'm a big believer in paying things forward.

    Bill

  17. #17
    Senior Member xoxoxoxoLive's Avatar
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    Not being sure about which bike will be right for you is a common question. The statement the gentleman
    made about test riding a bike and not being sure you like it, so go buy a Wally Mart bike was foolish ( although you can ride it for a couple months then return it with proof of purchase ) LOL. Here is what I did, but I do not
    recommend this to you, since you have already stated you know nothing about bikes, but I bought and sold
    around 20 last year off Craigslist looking for just that right one, but I DO know something about bikes, and never
    lost a penny on any of them, and can build one from frame up. Craigslist can be a huge blessing for trying
    different bikes out for a couple of months instead of rides at the bike shop, but it is a very dog eat world also,
    plenty of people trying to rip you off, so you would need to know what things cost, and what kind of condition
    there in, I was shocked at some of the things I seen people trying to sell. The bike I recommended for you is
    marketed as a Hybrid, Giant Roam 1 and it really is a great multi purpose bike, decent components, could
    double as a light XC riding bike, street bike, commuter, and will not break the bank at 579.00 dollars, has one
    draw back, it is a little on the heavy side, but Solid and still very fast on the road. The tires that come on it are multi
    purpose also, but can easily be changed to just about anything once you have decided on what you like best, I liked
    the tires so much, that I went out and bought a set. LOL Would have bought the bike on spot, but was going to take
    4 months to get a Large in. I seen the bike in early 2010 and it is a 2011 model. But just keep doing your home work,
    and you will find the right one. Link http://www.giant-bicycles.com/en-us/...11/7244/43949/ I ended up finding out that a Hardtail MTB was better suited for my riding
    style.


    bike ride ( Tool Kit Review ) 005.jpg Richard

  18. #18
    Senior Member kevrider's Avatar
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    Bill, another viewpoint... i think you're doing this backwards. given your experience and intended usage, i think you should be shopping for a good bike shop. find a place with helpful and knowledgeable staff that will educate you on cycling in general that will not make you feel bad for hanging out there, asking a thousand questions and test riding all of their bikes. in the process, you will learn what you really want and need now and what you might want/need a year or two from now. maybe you'll decide to get the bike you will grow into right away, maybe not. but in any case, for the money you're spending, you will get a nice machine regardless of the nameplate.

    Trek is good stuff. Specialized is good stuff. ditto Giant, Cannondale, blah, blah, blah and even the companies you've never heard of make great bikes. every hybrid and mtn bike priced $500-1000 will have similar quality and components and i doubt you will destroy one. you've overemphasized the make. at this price point, subtle differences between brands are nonexistent. everyone can weld alloy and they all buy the important parts from Shimano, SRAM, Mavic, etc......

    find a good bike shop. buy whatever brand they sell. ride and smile.
    Last edited by kevrider; 02-27-11 at 02:41 PM.
    In a world full of people, only some want to ride. Isn't that crazy?
    Seal/CRAZY/misquoted

  19. #19
    Senior Member meanwhile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Honest Bill View Post
    Thanks, Sportster2009.

    Follow-up questions:

    1) gearing with a GF hybrid won't be a problem for me? we do have some pretty steep hills where I live ... Eureka Springs in the Ozark Mountains of NW Arkansas ... Fayetteville, where my son lives and will be riding most of the time, is more rolling and flater

    2) the wheels on the GF hybrids are larger than what are on the Trek true mountain bikes, like the 4300? if so, that makes it easier for speed on pavement? however, I don't see speed being really improtant to me

    3) "trek dc's"?

    As far as off-road, most of mine will be on county gravel roads and bike trails (not paved and through the woods) in our parks ... though you can get agressive on our bike trails (big rocks, trees, downhill), that's not what I'll be doing ... mostly staying on the trails, which can get sloppy at times but are typical of mountain trails for the most part.

    Thanks,

    Bill
    It's important to realize that the gears on a bike can be easily - and quite cheaply! - changed. Don't sweat this too much. But when in doubt get the widest ratio you can, and pay more attention to hill climbing power than top speed.

    Don't listen to the person who thinks larger wheels are faster on the road - 17" wheel Moultons are banned from the Tour De France as unfair competition! Well, I'm sure that he means well, but if larger wheels were faster than racing cars would look like old penny farthing bikes..

    Finally, re a suspension fork: consider getting a bike without one. Cheap suspension forks are nasty objects and exist most to make a bike look a certain way - just like some children's bicycles used to have motorcycle style fuel tanks. You'll do better with fatter and higher quality lower pressure tyres instead.

    Imo you'd both be fine with good 1990 issue mountain bikes bought off ebay. Say $200 a piece and as much fix-up money. The frame quality would probably be higher than anything you could get today for less than $1500 too. But buying a modern bike is easier.

    My tips:

    - Ask the store about options for changing gear ratios on any bike you like - a good one will be very helpful and offer to deduct the cost of the chainrings or cassette you are discarding from the price of fitting a new one.

    - The bike's fit to your anatomy is key; make sure you buy the right size bike. Think about how upright or crouched over you want to be.

    - Consider bikes with no suspension forks and fitted with high quality "balloon" tyres. They'll be ultra comfortable, quite fast, and more reliable. But I always say this, and people who have bought bikes with cheap suspension forks (i.e. ones that cost less than a round what you want to pay for a bike) hate hearing it.

    - Phone around stores looking for last years models of suitable bikes: you should get a big discount if you find something suitable.
    Last edited by meanwhile; 02-27-11 at 03:19 PM.

  20. #20
    Senior Member xoxoxoxoLive's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by meanwhile View Post
    It's important to realize that the gears on a bike can be easily - and quite cheaply! - changed. Don't sweat this too much. But when in doubt get the widest ratio you can, and pay more attention to hill climbing power than top speed.

    Don't listen to the person who thinks larger wheels are faster on the road - 17" wheel Moultons are banned from the Tour De France as unfair competition! Well, I'm sure that he means well, but if larger wheels were faster than racing cars would look like old penny farthing bikes..

    Finally, re a suspension fork: consider getting a bike without one. Cheap suspension forks are nasty objects and exist most to make a bike look a certain way - just like some children's bicycles used to have motorcycle style fuel tanks. You'll do better with fatter and higher quality lower pressure tyres instead.

    Imo you'd both be fine with good 1990 issue mountain bikes bought off ebay. Say $200 a piece and as much fix-up money. The frame quality would probably be higher than anything you could get today for less than $1500 too. But buying a modern bike is easier.

    My tips:

    - Ask the store about options for changing gear ratios on any bike you like - a good one will be very helpful and offer to deduct the cost of the chainrings or cassette you are discarding from the price of fitting a new one.

    - The bike's fit to your anatomy is key; make sure you buy the right size bike. Think about how upright or crouched over you want to be.

    - Consider bikes with no suspension forks and fitted with high quality "balloon" tyres. They'll be ultra comfortable, quite fast, and more reliable. But I always say this, and people who have bought bikes with cheap suspension forks (i.e. ones that cost less than a round what you want to pay for a bike) hate hearing it.

    - Phone around stores looking for last years models of suitable bikes: you should get a big discount if you find something suitable.


    bikes for sale 005.jpg bikes for sale 008.jpg

    I think he might mean something like this bike, Giant ATX 860, all Alivio components, from hubs, to shifters, brakes, Etc...
    Light weight around 25 pounds, 40 dollars off Craigslist. Mint condition ! Would cost at least a 1000.00 dollars now. But in
    my previous post, do you know what to look for ? Oh, by the way, I kept it. 40 bucks ! My son's new MTB. I had to fix one cable.
    Look for a good bike shop you can trust, Richard

  21. #21
    we be rollin' hybridbkrdr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xoxoxoxoLive View Post
    Very rude post, ( My Guess is you ride an over priced __________ ) ..but don't start bashing Waly Mart Bikes.

    or the original OP ! He seemed sincere, and you sound arrogant and selfish ! Sorry if that offends you, but I

    call it, like it reads... Richard
    Well, that's your opinion. How about reading Feeling Good by David Burns on false negative assumptions?

    I NEVER bashed Wal-Mart bikes. I have a cheap bike for winter biking from Canadian Tire. Did you intentionally misinterpret what I was saying to start something?

    I'm saying he needs to start with a cheap bicycle. If you say you have enough experience to decide in several seconds whether you want a bike or not and some people ASSUME that you're being arrogant, well, frankly that is not my problem. M'kay?

  22. #22
    Senior Member lucille's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hybridbkrdr View Post
    I'm saying he needs to start with a cheap bicycle.
    I disagree. I think he should get the best bike he can afford, that feels good to him. There's a big difference between riding a good bike that feels great, and a heavy Canadian Tire/Wallmart bike with cheap components that's a chore to use. If you know you will want a better bike anyway, buying a crap bike, it's a waste of money.

    And yeah, you were a bit rude. Just sayin'

  23. #23
    Senior Member xoxoxoxoLive's Avatar
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    My computer screen had more dust on it than the F4, Paid 300.00 dollars for it ! 2000.00 dollar XC racer. Was not to fond
    of the HeadShok, if it ever needed repairing, so I sold it. Also it was a medium, and I ride a Large.


    bike ride ( Tool Kit Review ) 005.jpg
    Richard : )

  24. #24
    Senior Member xoxoxoxoLive's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hybridbkrdr View Post
    If you're THAT confused about bikes, I would just get a hybrid. The last time I did research, I liked the GT Traffic 3.0

    But, seriously, I don't think you sound like someone who knows bikes at all. I've ridden bikes for years and years, all kinds of styles and can tell you I can just sit on one and tell you if I want to buy it. So, I would go to Wal-Mart, get a cheap one and get some experience before you can REALLY choose a bike you want.

    Excuse me for the rude tone of the message. I'd rather be blunt than to dress it up and avoid the truth.
    I'm sorry you did not bash Walmart bikes, but you can just sit on one and know if it is right for you !
    Took me a year of buying bikes, riding ones at the shop, everyone in the store almost ! From about 4
    bike shops, to find one that I ( REALLY ) liked ! Maybe I am just a slow learner. Richard

  25. #25
    Senior Member meanwhile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xoxoxoxoLive View Post
    bikes for sale 005.jpg bikes for sale 008.jpg

    I think he might mean something like this bike, Giant ATX 860, all Alivio components, from hubs, to shifters, brakes, Etc...
    Light weight around 25 pounds, 40 dollars off Craigslist. Mint condition ! Would cost at least a 1000.00 dollars now.
    Well, I don't like the colour - but otherwise, hell yes. But for $40 that's an insane deal - I think you were either very lucky or extremely skilled in mind control techniques. That looks like an easy $400 of used bike to me. With the tyres changed to dual on/odd road ones like Marathon Duremes that bike would be ideal for either of these riders.
    Last edited by meanwhile; 02-27-11 at 06:58 PM.

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