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  1. #1
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    Moving parts to new frame...

    Hi,

    I've been cycling since before I can remember, but this is the first time I've decided to undertake anything more than tightening brake cables or adjusting gears so I'm posting here for advice.

    Basically a couple of years ago, I had a very nice Claud Butler MTB, that had its life cut short when a storm caused a clump of bricks from a chimney to fall down the side of our house onto the bike. Because our insurance was a bit crap, the best we could get was a 250 voucher for Halfords without paying any excess. At the time, I wasn't riding much so I chose a replacement bike and let it sit around like it's predecessor.

    Fast forward to now, I have decided to start riding again. The bike I currently have is a Carrera Vulcan Disc Spec. I can't remember what year we got it exactly, but it is red. Exactly like this:

    http://images.thebikelist.co.uk/imag...in-bike-08.jpg

    There are a few things I don't like about the bike. The first two I have changed. These were the tyres which I have replaced for semi-slick road tyes, and the handlebars (originally too wide, almost 70cm) which I have replaced with some 540mm ones.
    Apart from this, the brakes, gears, rims and forks all seem decent enough. Even though they aren't the lightest parts available, the frame is adding the vast majority of the overall weight, as it doesn't feel much lighter with both wheels and tyres taken off. For this reason I want to replace the frame with something lighter.
    After a look around online, I found this:

    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/M...uctDescription

    First I should ask if it will actually be lighter than my current frame? It is made from 7005 alloy, which Wikipedia tells me is a alluminium-zinc-magnesium alloy. I know that each of these metals is considered lightweight, but it might not be as simple as that with regards to a bicycle frame. However, my main question is that of compatibility with the parts on my current bike (the Carrera Vulvan Disc Spec) as if I can reuse them all, I effectively reduce the weight of my bike considerably for only 135.

    The only thing I've previously built with components from the ground up is a computer, but as far as fitting components inside a case is concerned, computing is pretty standardised into a single(ish) universal specification.

    It would be easy for me to compare size specs of the Scott frame to my Carrera bike, but I cannot find measurements for the Carrera anywhere online. If it makes any difference, I would be getting the x-large Scott frame (6 foot 2 here)

    Thank you very much for any help or advice,
    Toby

  2. #2
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    As far as I know, isn't Carrera a house brand for Halfords? I only know of the brand because a expat friend of mine rides one, and he shipped it here (Canada) from the UK. So probably won't be able to find specs for it. I can't say the weight of either frames, but I can't imagine it being a huge difference.
    But you would also need to buy new wheels, tires, tubes as well, since the Scott is a Hybrid frame which will probably need 700c tires, and the MTB use 26" wheels. A new fork to go with the frame, since that fork won't work with the new wheel size. I'm also not sure, since I don't see brake mounts, or disc brake mounts on the Scott frame, you would need to buy new brakes as well.

    I would just ride the crap out of that Carrera, or flip it and buy something you like. Transferring parts over to the Scott frame probably won't be the way to go.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlphaV View Post
    As far as I know, isn't Carrera a house brand for Halfords? I only know of the brand because a expat friend of mine rides one, and he shipped it here (Canada) from the UK. So probably won't be able to find specs for it. I can't say the weight of either frames, but I can't imagine it being a huge difference.
    But you would also need to buy new wheels, tires, tubes as well, since the Scott is a Hybrid frame which will probably need 700c tires, and the MTB use 26" wheels. A new fork to go with the frame, since that fork won't work with the new wheel size. I'm also not sure, since I don't see brake mounts, or disc brake mounts on the Scott frame, you would need to buy new brakes as well.

    I would just ride the crap out of that Carrera, or flip it and buy something you like. Transferring parts over to the Scott frame probably won't be the way to go.
    The brakes were my initial concern. However, on the rear horizontal bar (I believe it is refered to as the left side chain stay) there are mounting points for a rear disc caliper. Although they aren't clearly visible in the photos. If my current brakes do not work, I am prepared to buy a set of Avid mechanicals, which include both rotors and calipers.

    I've just measured my wheels and they aren't even 26", they are around 22 inches or 57cm across. Would this be a problem if the frame is designed for bigger wheels? I can well imagine that a frame designed for small wheels would not accomodate larger ones, but the other way round should be ok shouldn't it?

    I suppose my main question is about the diameter of the headtube and bit where the pedals go through the frame and whether my current fork and pedals will be the right size? Do these usually have a unique size or are they a standardised size for bikes of a similar type?

    Cheers,
    Toby

  4. #4
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    If you're 6'2, I'm pretty sure it's 26" you can check the tyre sidewall yourself. Adult mountain bikes wheels only come in two sizes, 26 and 29er (which is actually a 700c size), 24" tires would be for children.
    Headtube size is mostly standard. Older mountain, hybrid and road bikes had 1" tubes, but almost all are 1 1/8" sized now. There are some oversized sizes that either don't exist anymore or on downhill bikes, which you don't need to worry about. You're also talking about the bottom bracket, which is the part that that attach the two sides of the crank (which attach to your pedals), is also pretty standard on all bikes. It uses what's called English Threading (yes there's Italian and French also, but you don't need to worry about it either) which is standard for almost everything that's new. It'll all fit, but it will throw off your geometry since the bike is designed for probably a 700c wheel. It'll put you in an aggressive position if you put that fork on, plus you'll have huge wheel gaps, and will look kinda silly if you choose to put fenders on your bike.

    My 2, sell the mountain bike if you want a hybrid. You'll have to pay a shop to transfer all your parts over, and they'll probably just give you a weird look, and that's if they'll do it since it's just tune up and flat repair season right now. Or you'll need to buy a bunch of specialized tools to transfers things over yourself. You're gonna spend a bunch of money anyways, you'll probably come out ahead if you just buy a new bike. You'll get a new bike, instead of a funny riding bike cause it's got the wrong size wheels.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlphaV View Post
    If you're 6'2, I'm pretty sure it's 26" you can check the tyre sidewall yourself. Adult mountain bikes wheels only come in two sizes, 26 and 29er (which is actually a 700c size), 24" tires would be for children.
    Headtube size is mostly standard. Older mountain, hybrid and road bikes had 1" tubes, but almost all are 1 1/8" sized now. There are some oversized sizes that either don't exist anymore or on downhill bikes, which you don't need to worry about. You're also talking about the bottom bracket, which is the part that that attach the two sides of the crank (which attach to your pedals), is also pretty standard on all bikes. It uses what's called English Threading (yes there's Italian and French also, but you don't need to worry about it either) which is standard for almost everything that's new. It'll all fit, but it will throw off your geometry since the bike is designed for probably a 700c wheel. It'll put you in an aggressive position if you put that fork on, plus you'll have huge wheel gaps, and will look kinda silly if you choose to put fenders on your bike.

    My 2, sell the mountain bike if you want a hybrid. You'll have to pay a shop to transfer all your parts over, and they'll probably just give you a weird look, and that's if they'll do it since it's just tune up and flat repair season right now. Or you'll need to buy a bunch of specialized tools to transfers things over yourself. You're gonna spend a bunch of money anyways, you'll probably come out ahead if you just buy a new bike. You'll get a new bike, instead of a funny riding bike cause it's got the wrong size wheels.
    You're right. My wheels are 26". I was just a bit stupid when I measured them with a tape measure ealier. A few people have said the same thing to me about the size of the wheels, however, my dads Trek su 600 has 22" frame with a similar geometry and that has 26" wheels with road slicks. It's a look I really like, plus I've ridden bikes with big wheels (presumably 29ers) and I'm not a fan. While I know the rolling resistance is less and they are better for covering distance, I feel I have more maneuverability on smaller wheels, which suits my riding style better.

    Thanks for the info on the compatibility of my components. There's only one thing I need to try and find out and that is the length of the head tube on the extra large size Scott SUB. My current head tube is 150mm and there doesn't seem to be room for expansion on my fork head.

    I'm actually considering buying these with the frame:

    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/M...?ModelID=54582

    What do you think?

    As for buying a whole new bike, it's a nice idea, but I cannot find anything that ticks all the boxes for what I want. Plus (and it's a big plus) I really like the idea of tickering around and learning the ropes a bit. I have an avid cyclist friend (cleats, carbon road bike, branded condom-wear etc) who used to work in bike shop who will be able to help me with anything I can't do.

    Thanks,
    Toby

    P.S I'm posting here because my friend is currently away

  6. #6
    ^ JBC. jbchybridrider's Avatar
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    Sell the Carrera then go to Halfords for a Boardman Pro hybrid.
    2010 Custom Carbon JBC, 1990 Ricardo Pinnacle, 1988 Ricardo Elite, 1983 Ricardo Varsity, 1990 Peugeot Hurricane, 1977 Dawes Galaxy GT, 2007 Pinarello F3-13, Custom aussie made 1980 Columbus SL racer, 1975 Calton Rapide, 1995 Olympia Fusari, 1993 Basso Viper.

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