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  1. #1
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    Bike to cross-train for running (Giant or Specialized) hybrid/mtb

    I'm really wanting a bike that I can ride to get extra cardio and work on my fitness for running. Im only about 2.5months into running, so the biking will help a bit rather than adding more milage to runs.

    I'll mostly be riding on the road, sidwalks, and asphalt park paths and possibly have to ride through the grass at times going to and from school. Im torn between mountain bikes and hybrid. I've been looking at the Giant revel 2 ($350) or 1 ($440) or Specialized hardrock ($420) or hardrock disk ($500) as a mountain bike that I could alway put a slick tire on. But as far as hybrid goes, im looking at the Giant Roam 1($560) or 2 ($440). I like the Roam 1 because it has the disk brakes, and suspension lockout/adjustment. But I like the revel 2 because its cheap, but i feel I'd regret not spending the tad extra for better quality parts.

    Need some input from others Thank you!

    Sorry, Here are links to the bikes

    hardrock: http://bikeworks.com/product/special...ck-72398-1.htm
    hardrock disk: http://bikeworks.com/product/special...c-105428-1.htm
    Revel 2: http://bikeworks.com/product/giant-revel-2-72469-1.htm
    Revel 1: http://bikeworks.com/product/giant-revel-1-72472-1.htm
    Roam 1: http://bikeworks.com/product/giant-roam-1-72491-1.htm
    Roam 2: http://bikeworks.com/product/giant-roam-2-72487-1.htm
    Last edited by tlxxxsracer; 07-19-11 at 12:26 PM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    Another one to look at is the Specialized Crosstrail. Those hybrids you mention plus the Crosstrail all have pretty MTB-like tires so I think any of them would serve you well. Just stay away from hybrids that have road tires and solid forks if you plan on going off the road. The hybrids will probably give you a little less resistance on the road than the full-on MTBs, but ultimately I'd just make a decision based on what feels better (assuming you can test ride these).

  3. #3
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    The crosstrail is $500. That puts it with the hardrock disk. I'm just unsure which has the better overall components and what would be the "best" for the price. My dad may be getting the crosstrail- and I dont really want to get the same bike lol!

    Resistance on the road isnt a big issue to me, after all im using it to get cardio- so either way i'll be getting a workout

    Thank you dolanp for your input. And yes, I've been staying away from solid forks.

  4. #4
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    Also just saw the Jamis Trail X3 http://bikeworks.com/product/jamis-trail-x3-74779-1.htm
    Not sure how it stacks against my other options above.

  5. #5
    Senior Member NormDeplume's Avatar
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    I'm a (halfarsed) runner, and I love running through trails in the woods-- have no desire to bike through them. So I bought the Specialized Vita (the man version is called the Sirrus). I decided against a suspension fork because pretty much all of my riding is done on streets/paved paths, and I want all my leg power to go into propelling me toward where I want to go.

  6. #6
    Two-Wheeled Aficionado ColinL's Avatar
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    All but the cheapest bikes now have lockout on their suspension forks. I do about 90-95% of my road/path biking locked out, but I do use it on cobblestones and other rough road. I do at least 80% of my offroad biking with the suspension enabled, and lock it out when I climb or sprint. Granted, on my bike the knob is very easy to reach and I can flip it quickly with no drama.. if you have to reach way down on the fork, switching it on the fly is not as feasible.

    Disc brakes are unnecessary for the street unless you live somewhere very rainy and you intend to ride in the rain. For MTBs they are great because they work well in the mud, but if you won't take your hybrid in the mud then again you don't need them. Get a bike with better components or just cheaper overall and use pinch brakes if you're staying mostly on-road. The suspension fork with lockout is more important than disc brakes.

    You'll use the suspension any time offroad, even mild trails, but you'd have to get into gnarly stuff to want/need discs.

  7. #7
    Two-Wheeled Aficionado ColinL's Avatar
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    BTW for the original poster- I saw that bit about riding through the grass. Thorns/stickers aren't a concern if you mean crossing a proper lawn, but if you're crossing unkempt/wild grass then you will want some puncture resistant tires. Some of the bikes you linked have them, but most don't. (This type of tire will cost you ~$25-45 each, if you add them later.)

  8. #8
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    Well grass and dirt would be next to a busy street on my way to school- no sidewalks.
    Yes- The majority or my riding will be on the road which is why I had an interest in lock out suspension.

    At my local shop I put a hold on the Revel 1. I figured it was the best for the price and not too cheap but not overly expensive.
    The (cute, i might add) girl showed me the puncture resistant tires (armadillos?) and how they have the kevlar lining inside.

    Any last comments, input or suggestions before next week would be awesome

  9. #9
    Two-Wheeled Aficionado ColinL's Avatar
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    Specialized's tires with armadillo protection are pretty good. Word of advice: this might seem obvious, but even with puncture-resistant tires if you see a thorn/sticker in your tire, IMMEDIATELY stop and pull it out. The thorn may not initially puncture your tube, but if you ride over it some more you could (likely, will) drive it in further and possibly puncture. When a thorn spike breaks off, they're not much fun to pluck out of your tire.

    Some might argue to not pull it out until you are ready to patch/replace the tube. I disagree; at the initial sticking of the object, you may still have time to remove it before you puncture and it's a risk worth taking.


    Oh, final comment: I do like the Specialized Hardrock as an entry MTB and commuter. Consider the 29er models; this will hurt your offroad tire selection, but open up a huge range of road-focused and dual sport/hybrid tires which are much faster on pavement than 26"x2" MTB tires. Also consider getting a good deal on a 2011 model vs. whatever upgrades 2012 may bring (and figure on MSRP for a 2012 to be safe). Specialized has the 2012 Hardrock on their site and you can compare to the 2011s. I would suggest this one, if your budget allows it: http://www.specialized.com/us/en/bc/...2+Early+Launch

  10. #10
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    Than you Colin for your input.

    Luckily, the bike shop offers free tubes for life if you buy a bike from them lol.
    Also, I tried this nice Specialized 29er ($1200).. but ran into the issue of when I turned the wheel sharply and went to peddle, that the front of my foot hit the tired

    Yes that bike is a tad out of my price range. They said they werent sure when they'd be getting the 2012 models.. so i could be waiting a while. Plus the revel 1 is the cheapest out of all the bike shops in my area. I think i may be able to get them to cut some off from the price will have to see.

  11. #11
    Two-Wheeled Aficionado ColinL's Avatar
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    I wear size 12 shoes and *all* of my bikes I can scrub the front tire doing radical low-speed turns. Yep-- even my 26" MTB.

    Two things about foot/tire collision:

    1. This only happens at extremely low speed. Due to leaning and the steering angle, you won't have this happen at speeds above a few MPH.
    2. You can avoid it by making sure your pedal & foot is not forward on the side you intend to turn. Complicated? No, not really, as you will also want to consciously avoid having your pedal LOW on the turning side during a fast turn or else it may hit the ground.

  12. #12
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    So what bike did you end up getting and how do you like it? I'm looking at the Revel 1 and Hardrock Disc, both 2012. I bought a Sirrus Sport from Bikeworks but want to do some urban and "mild trail" riding neither of which is suited for the Sirrus. btw, I put boroughs elite armidillo on the sirrus and love them.

  13. #13
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    I'll weigh in for rigid forks. At the price range you are at, a suspension fork will essentially be a pogo stick on the front of your bike. Save some money and get a rigid fork. If you want a smoother, less bumpy ride, get bigger tires. Chances are if you have a lock out on your fork it will be difficult to reach and a mechanical lock out, not hydraulic. This means that you can't have any weight on it when locking it out. Unless you are awesome at wheelies, it makes it almost impossible to do while riding. I have an DS 8.3 and swapped out the suspension fork and am very happy. I just wished I had got a bike with a rigid fork to start and saved some money. I agree about the disc brakes. Great for mountain biking, but more than necessary for normal riding. They're a plus, but not something you should focus your purchase on.

  14. #14
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    Warning: Lots of bad advice in this thread.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by qmsdc15 View Post
    Warning: Lots of bad advice in this thread.
    Care to elaborate?

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