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  1. #1
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    Giant Cypress vs. Giant Cypress DX + owners share your opinions on this bike

    I've heard great things about the Giant Cypress hybrid bike.
    If you own a Cypress I would love to hear your review (positives and negatives)
    I will be using it for commuting, between 20-30 miles a day.
    I care less about top speed and much more about ruggedness, longevity, hopping off an occasional curb, dealing with wet weather, and a comfortable ride.
    All my riding is on-pavement. My commute is flat, but I often take my bicycle to San Francisco and other cities where I deal with serious hills on weekends.

    The 3 local bike shops that carry this have the standard Giant Cypress in stock
    for about $330. They can special order the Cypress DX, which adds about another $100.
    I'm not sure if the extra $100 and wait is worth it.

    The only differences between these two bikes (as listed on the website) are
    the following

    1. The more expensive DX has rapid fire shifters vs. twist. I'm used to twist, but I
    don't know how much more convenient it would be to have rapid fire shifters for commuting. Twist shifters are known for accidentally changing gears, which can be annoying. My current bike has this issue.

    2. The more expensive DX has SRAM PG820 11x32, 8-Speed vs. Shimano TZ37 14x34, 7-Speed. I'm not sure how the different cassette and extra gears translates when riding in real-world conditions.
    Last edited by techman; 08-07-11 at 01:10 PM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    My very first "adult" bike was a Cypress. Its stolen now, but I still remember her well. I would NOT commute 20-30 miles on a Cypress, simply because of the poor shock... I could see the bike pogo-ing up and down with every pedal stroke, especially under high load. Pretty much ANY bike can hop off the occasional curb, although if you plan to make that a part of your regular commute a suspension fork would make it easier than most. The question I have is thus: if you're already going 20 miles, is there no way you could go an extra hundred or so feet to avoid having to jump off a curb? It'll save your wheels a lot of wear and tear, suspension or no suspension.

    1. Rapid Fire vs Twist: Typically a matter of preference. My Cypress had the twist shifters, and I loved them. I find that even cheap twist shifters can be made to work well, given that they're basically two notched composite rings clicking against each other. The micro-indexing on the front shifter comes in handy for dealing with chain rub, something Rapid Fire shifters don't do. On the other hand, the Rapid Fire shifters will be more consistent/precise when shifting the FD.
    2. The basic Cypress comes with a "Mega Range" FREEWHEEL, not cassette. There two issues here. First, you're up a creek if you want to upgrade to most 8- or higher speed systems in the future, which all use cassettes. You'd have to replace the rear wheel/hub (on the other hand, 7 speed freewheels are very cheap these days). The other issue is that a Mega Range FW is basically a six-speed 14-24 FW with a final 34t cog glued on the end. This means there is a huge jump at the bottom of the range, which basically makes the 34t a bailout gear (14-16-18-20-22-24-34). The PG-820 is configured a little more closely, and goes 11-12-14-16-18-21-26-32. While this spacing still has a lot of big jumps near the low end, the range is more even, which means you'll have an easier time picking a good gear if you are going up a hill, since the largest jump you have to contend with is 6 teeth, not 10.

    The other differences between the two bikes I noticed is that the DX has a slightly nicer crankset, and the tires are marginally nicer. If you can get the bike shop to order a DX for you to TRY (without putting any money down), you should take both for a test ride. The differences between the two bikes are subtle and probably more a matter of preference, so its impossible to say which is better when one considers the $100 price difference. Good luck.

  3. #3
    Senior Member John_V's Avatar
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    I have a Cypress and I rode both it and the DX when I purchased it. I stuck with the Cypress because I was used to the twist shifters that I had on my Sedona. I didn't think that the rapid fire shifters were as quick to shift across a range of gears as the twist shifters are. I have had the Cypress since last July and have put 2,500 miles on it and I still ride it quite a bit. I have had absolutely no issues or problems with the bike. It shifts very smooth and the gear range should be OK for what you are going to do. The only thing that I have done to it was to change the saddle with a road style saddle as the one that comes with it was pretty bad on rides longer than 10 miles. There is one more difference between the Cypress and the Cypress DX that wasn't mentioned above and that is that the front forks are adjustable and lockable on the DX and are neither on the Cypress. I have read a lot on locking vs non-locking shock forks as far as their efficiency when climbing. We don't have any hills here in Tampa, but we do have some pretty steep bridges and overpasses at some of the bike trails and I have climbed them with no problems on my Cypress. The granny gear on the freewheel is great.

    I will agree with A10K on trying to get your LBS to get the DX and try them both. That is the only way you will actually know which one is best for you.
    HCFR Cycling Team
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    2012 Colnago Ace
    2010 Giant Cypress

  4. #4
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    A lockable suspension would be great. But according to Giant, the DX has a
    RST SOFI 'T' Suspension fork, which according to RST does not lockout
    http://www.giant-bicycles.com/en-us/...ss/7354/44064/
    http://www.rst.com.tw/ct/product/pro...I1249365475734

    perhaps Giant discountinued the lockout suspension on newer Cypress DX models.

  5. #5
    Have bike, will travel Barrettscv's Avatar
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    I re-started my cycling 3 years ago with a Giant Cypress. It's a very good bike and ideal for your stated needs. I replaced the wheels with 32 spoke A319 Mavic rims, this was a good upgrade.

    I moved on to using a road bike within a year, but I'm glad I started with a solid and reliable bike.

  6. #6
    Saving gas on my commute Scooby214's Avatar
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    If you really want a Cypress, you may want to look into the Cypress ST with the rigid fork. It does also have the 7-speed 14-34 megarange freewheel, but that shouldn't be a deal breaker. My commuter bike once had a 14-34 megarange freewheel, but it was easy to switch out to a 13-28 freewheel. Having a cassette instead of a freewheel would be better, but I've had good success with cheap freewheels. You can pick one up off of Amazon for less than $20 when you wear yours out, and they are not difficult to change out at home.

    If you can't get the Cypress ST, the regular Cypress should be fine for your needs.

  7. #7
    Senior Member EsoxLucius's Avatar
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    I got a 2009 Giant Cypress DX to replace an old Giant Nutra. I rode it for less than a year before getting something else. Although the Cypress DX is a pretty nice bike, it was not a good fit for the majority of my riding, and I ended up with a flat bar road bike with a steel frame and carbon fork. That particular bike is more efficient and more comfortable to ride than the Cypress DX. I think the Cypress ST (steel frame and fork) would be a good choice and add the extra $100 that a DX would cost to upgrading the seat and seatpost, and then replace the rear derailleur when the Tourney breaks or wears out. I find no difficulty not jumping curbs riding up to 115 miles a week.

  8. #8
    Senior Member John_V's Avatar
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    perhaps Giant discountinued the lockout suspension on newer Cypress DX models.
    When I got mine in July of last year, I test rode both of them and when I asked about the differences in the two, the bike shop owner said the forks on the DX locked. I can't swear to it because I didn't buy the DX and it may have been with older models that he was thinking of as well. Scratch that as a difference.
    HCFR Cycling Team
    Ride Safe ... Ride Hard ... Ride Daily

    2012 Colnago Ace
    2010 Giant Cypress

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