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Old 09-26-11, 09:09 AM   #1
bikecrate
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Renew or New…

I have a 03’ Trek 7500 FX. I’ve probably put over 10,000 miles on it. The rims have just cracked and the wheels are shot. Most of the components still work fine and the frame looks decent, but they are showing signs of their age with various rubs and scratches.
First question, what kind of wheels? The local LBS thought any standard 700c wheels would work as a replacement. Does that sound right? Anybody got a recommendation? I run 700 x 28 sized tires on the current wheels and tend to ride only on pavement. Of course, I would like something light, fast and durable.
Second question, considering the cost of a decent set of wheels and all the other little things it would take to make this bike right again, is it time to start looking for a replacement? This bike is like an old friend, but if I’m spending about half the amount of a new bike I’d at least want to consider a replacement. I've been wanting more of a flat bar road bike anyways.
What would you do…???
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Old 09-26-11, 09:37 AM   #2
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If it's going to cost you 50% of a new bike to bring up the old bike to 100% functional, then I'd start looking for a new bike, jmho. Especially since you are looking for a possible, "switch" in style. If your really happy with the Trek, then go for the rebuild and enjoy. I went from a "MTB, converted" to a hybrid to a new Jamis Coda Sport, "flat bar" road bike and I've very happy with the "style change", YMMV.
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Old 09-28-11, 08:06 AM   #3
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I guess I'm leaning towards new.

I'll have to sell the old bike as unrideable for parts.
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Old 09-28-11, 09:48 AM   #4
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Buy a new one, try to get a model just gone out of date as 2012 is round the corner, plenty of fantastic offers to be had on those IMO and yours is always worthwhile to someone for a few $$$ to go against the new one.

Always nice to have new, IMO.
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Old 09-28-11, 12:26 PM   #5
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As much as I agree on the "nice new bike", it is also worthwile to think about how good your old bike has been to you, in the sense that a magnitude of mileage and years must equal good riding and trustworthyness. Perfectly dialed in as well. A restoration will secure you years to come with comfortable riding to a lesser expense than a new bike. Scratches is nothing but cool to me.

700´s will probably do nicely.
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Old 09-28-11, 12:38 PM   #6
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That's tough, on the one hand, if you're spending half the cost of new, I can see the value of going new, but on the other hand, if you really like how this one fits and rides, why mess with a good thing and just upgrade. Hmmm, tough call.
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Old 09-28-11, 02:19 PM   #7
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IMO, most bikes under $1k come with pretty generic cheap wheels. Upgrade what you have. I have not used them, but Vuelta wheels get good reviews and can be had reasonably cheaply at Nashbar and other spots. Bicycle Wheel Warehouse has lots of options too.

I wouldn't get hung up on 50% of new bike price. It is all about how much money leaves your pocket. If you spend 70% of new bike price and upgrade to parts you love, you have parts you love and 30% of new bike value in your pocket.

Granted, I spend way too much on upgrading bike parts, and building up my own bikes, but every ride I enjoy all of the pieces that I picked. If you have never tried upgrading, try it and enjoy the process.
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Old 09-29-11, 07:35 AM   #8
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Good points by everyone. I keep going back and forth. I hate to waste things. Just thinking about parting out my old bike gives me shivers. I call it my "scout". In addition to my weekly night rides, I usually take it on new rides and vacations because I know it can cope with the unknown road conditions better than my road bike.
I saw these wheels on bicycle Wheel Warehouse - http://www.bicyclewheelwarehouse.com...s/prod_81.html. They run $199. I think I found a seller on Amazon who has them for $149.
If I go this way I've committed myself to a least another couple of years with this bike. I've got to get my money's worth.

A new bike is so tempting. Arghhhhhh! This is killing me.
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Old 09-29-11, 02:34 PM   #9
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Solution:

Don't sell your old bike!

However, you can buy a new Coda (2011 * $500) or a new Coda Sport!

After you've recouped from the expense of the new bike, gradually upgrade your older bike. First dissasemble the bike. Next have it powder-coated glossy black or something. Get the wheels after a couple of months or so. The following month maybe get the tires. After a few more months, get new derailleurs. So on and so forth...etc.

By this time next year, you'll have two "new" bikes instead of just one. One will be for running errands, trekking on rough terrain, and locking in marginally secure areas. The other will be used exclusively for enjoyment and recreation.

Besides, everyone should have a plan B, back-up commuter bike anyway! ...Right?

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Old 09-29-11, 02:37 PM   #10
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You can get a set of Mavic A319 rims laced to Shimano hubs off the peg for less than $200.00... tack on $40.00 to have them professionally tuned to ensure the build is sound and then ride your bike for another 20,000 miles.

If you ride a lot and depend on your bike to get you places, a B bike makes good sense.
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Old 09-29-11, 04:05 PM   #11
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There are many options at $200, and you see tons of the Mavics around, which I think is a testament to them. If memory serves, the CXP series are the more aero profile, vs their box rim series. Remember that wheels are a totally portable upgrade, so whatever you buy is never wasted even if you later get a different bike or set up.

I bought a set of Easton EA50's (which are about $400 list and I got for a steal) and they were a fabulous improvement over the stock Alex rims. Consider your wheel budget, and more spend, IMHO, does yield more improvements, at least in feel for me.

You might also want to check out a shifter upgrade if you decide to upgrade the current rig. I went from low end Shimano to SRAM X9 and they are phenomenal. The X9's are the lowest level with the direct acting shifters in MTB components (or zero loss or whatever they call it) and they shift like a dream.

You should also take all of my advice with a grain of salt. In the past 18 months, I bought a bike new, swapped for another new bike, replaced every component on the 2nd bike except frame and fork, bought frame and fork and moved all upgrade components too it, bought parts to change it to drop bars and then back to flat, bought another frame and again moved all of the parts, and changed the previous bike to a single speed. I am extremely decisive for very short periods of time.
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Old 09-30-11, 12:44 AM   #12
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I was just thinking about this situation a few days ago. I was wondering why I would ever buy a new bike to replace either of my two current bikes. (road bike and hybrid)
Other than a frame fail, I don't think I would. The geometry on both are perfect for me and I'd prefer to just replace what fails as opposed to buying another complete bike just because they're old.
We all think differently and we all know what we all want.
Are you happy with your bike now? (yes)
Keep it.
You want fast and reliable wheels? (yes)
Get some mavic open pro rims, DT Swiss spokes laced to your hubs. If your hubs are shot, get some Shimano hubs.
Just some food for thought.
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Old 09-30-11, 08:47 AM   #13
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I've completely filp flopped back to fixing the old bike. There's some pretty good wheel options in the $150 - $200 range. Probably not the lightest, but they should do. I'll not worry about upgrading. Minimally I need to replace the seat and do a tune up. I'll continue to use it as my urban "scout" machine.

Meanwhile, I'll keep my eyes open for a possible flat bar road bike find on Craigslist. I would still like to have something between my hybrid and road bike.

Anyways that's today's plan.
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Old 09-30-11, 09:47 AM   #14
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Two new wheels, tires, new chain and a tuneup will cost you at least $500.

A new 7.5 is only $1k. New and improved parts, a +5mph for new bike syndrome, and you get a new bike!

I'd say buy a new one, and keep the old one around until you're ready to sell it. Or you can just convert it to a fixie in a few years just to keep it around.
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Old 09-30-11, 10:05 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robberry View Post
Two new wheels, tires, new chain and a tuneup will cost you at least $500.

A new 7.5 is only $1k. New and improved parts, a +5mph for new bike syndrome, and you get a new bike!

I'd say buy a new one, and keep the old one around until you're ready to sell it. Or you can just convert it to a fixie in a few years just to keep it around.
Where do you shop for parts ?

You cannot turn an FX into a fixed gear without spending a great deal of coin for an eccentric hub due to the vertical dropouts.

If it is just a case of needing new wheels the Op is looking at paying less than $200.00 and might need someone to swap the cassette to the new wheel.

Installing a new chain is easy enough that my 11 year old daughter can do it... and she knows how to swap a cassette too although her size and strength can limit what she can do in the shop.

Op could have his bike running like new for much less than $500.00.
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Old 09-30-11, 10:33 AM   #16
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I would fix it and ride it. Then I'd look to upgrade later and start saving now.
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