Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 19 of 19
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    149
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    What's the roughest terrain you'll go over on your hybrid?

    I took my hybrid, a rigid aluminium trek with 35mm tyres, down to the various unpaved roads and paths near the river I live. Much of it was just gravel road with potholes, and depressions where muddy water had gathered, but some of it was some very deeply rutted forest paths, no roots sticking out though but still pretty bumpy. The kind of thing you'd need a 4wd to go over.

    All 'n' all, I very much enjoyed this sort of mild off-road stuff. I thought it was just right for the sort of bike I was on (though I'm a heavy dude and did worry about the wheels...)

    Anyway it got me thinking - what's the roughest stuff you'll tackle with a hybrid? Photos would be nice - I apologise for the lack of my own, might see if I can borrow a camera at some point.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1,109
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Paved MUP completely covered with eucalyptus leaves and nuts wet by the morning dew. Not rough really, but vvery precarious. Wet leaves can slide around and rolling over a eucalyptus nut means the tire will make the nut shoot off to the side while sliding sideways off the nut.

  3. #3
    ^ JBC. jbchybridrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    adelaide, australia
    Posts
    1,680
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My hybrid is custom built with little expense spared, there no place I wont take it "Its up to my riding ability really"
    2010 Custom Carbon JBC, 1990 Ricardo Pinnacle, 1988 Ricardo Elite, 1983 Ricardo Varsity, 1990 Peugeot Hurricane, 1977 Dawes Galaxy GT, 2007 Pinarello F3-13, Custom aussie made 1980 Columbus SL racer, 1975 Calton Rapide, 1995 Olympia Fusari, 1993 Basso Viper.

  4. #4
    Banned
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Northern California
    My Bikes
    Raleigh Grand Prix, Giant Innova, Nishiki Sebring, Trek 7.5FX
    Posts
    5,804
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by jsdavis View Post
    Paved MUP completely covered with eucalyptus leaves and nuts wet by the morning dew. Not rough really, but vvery precarious. Wet leaves can slide around and rolling over a eucalyptus nut means the tire will make the nut shoot off to the side while sliding sideways off the nut.
    Hi there JSDavis!

    Need I remind you that whiskey should never be taken on an empty stomach. Tends to go straight to the head without warning!

    - Slim
    Last edited by SlimRider; 10-11-11 at 08:36 AM.

  5. #5
    Banned
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Northern California
    My Bikes
    Raleigh Grand Prix, Giant Innova, Nishiki Sebring, Trek 7.5FX
    Posts
    5,804
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Nobody should ever mistake their hybrid for a MTN bike. Hybrids were not intended to go down mountain sides, over large roots, rocks, and crevices. For that type of activity, you need a genuine, bonafide, authentic, MTB.
    A double suspension MTN bike would be even better going downhill.

    You would never practice DH MTN biking with a simple hybrid!

    Now country trails and small country hills with slight inclines are fine, provided that the trails are fairly clear of roots, rocks, and crevices. You particularly don't want an aluminum hybrid continually jarring up and down, on a daily basis.

    Hybrids were made for City/Country road terrain changes. Road bikes just don't feel right on gravel and dirt roads. They feel so much better on paved roads. Hybrids usually feel good on either one. Of course, tire size has much to do with that fact, as well.

    - Slim

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    149
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by SlimRider View Post
    Nobody should ever mistake their hybrid for a MTN bike. Hybrids were not intended to go down mountain sides, over large roots, rocks, and crevices.
    I don't do anything that extreme. Some sand, deep puddles and loose pebbles are pretty fun on 35mm tyres though

  7. #7
    Bicycle Repair Man !!! Sixty Fiver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    YEG
    My Bikes
    See my sig...
    Posts
    25,157
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    I had my Trek 7500 built up so it could handle rocky and rooty singletrack... and rode in places where one would only expect a mountain bike.

    If the bike is tough enough to handle it, the rest comes down to skill and experience in riding off road.

  8. #8
    Senior Member The Chemist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Shanghai, China
    My Bikes
    Giant FCR3500
    Posts
    492
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Considering I've now got road wheels (Shimano RS10) on my hybrid, I won't take it off the pavement at all, even though it's got wider than road bike 28mm tires on it. Just not comfortable taking those low spoke count wheels off road at all.
    Luke Richardson - Shanghai, China
    Giant FCR3500 - "Big Red"

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    266
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    +1 on what Slim says...

  10. #10
    ^ JBC. jbchybridrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    adelaide, australia
    Posts
    1,680
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Bunnicula View Post
    +1 on what Slim says...
    1. Yep no alcohol on a empty stomach
    2. True to a degree for stock dealer sold hybrids but all hybrids are not created equal "there many and varied"
    2010 Custom Carbon JBC, 1990 Ricardo Pinnacle, 1988 Ricardo Elite, 1983 Ricardo Varsity, 1990 Peugeot Hurricane, 1977 Dawes Galaxy GT, 2007 Pinarello F3-13, Custom aussie made 1980 Columbus SL racer, 1975 Calton Rapide, 1995 Olympia Fusari, 1993 Basso Viper.

  11. #11
    Junior Member Grecs80's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    16
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I did some trail testing last week and I was surprised at how well my Hybrid held up (2012 Giant Roam 1). I tried to take some pics to show the difficulty level of the trails but they didn't come out too good due to being a 1.3 megapixel cell phone.

    The most difficult aspect of these trails were the steep declines and inclines which I found the tires held up well. The rear tired didn't spin out when climbing the steep incline nor did they slide on the decline. The disc brakes worked great too and I found it really easy to control the decent.

    The front suspension was put to the test riding some of the thinner trails that were covered in roots and slippery wet leaves. They worked great!

    I tried to takes as much pics as possible but again due to the low quality, you can't really scale the level of the trails: http://imgur.com/a/Vo6yr#12

    I plan to go with an GoPro HD or ContourHD next time (depending on which I decide to get).

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    England
    Posts
    12,074
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Ive ridden a roadbike with 28mm tyres down scary steep MTB trails and a fully loaded touring bike on 32mm tyres up and down mountain trails.
    The only limit to the terrain you can ride is your own skill. Of course you can ride more aggressively with a specialist MTB bike and hit roots and rocks hard, make big jumps etc. You cant do that on a hybrid but you dont need to.
    The only proviso I would have is that the bars are a bit high on most hybrids for off roading and you will get better balance on steep descents with a cross-county style low flat bar.

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    149
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelW View Post
    Ive ridden a roadbike with 28mm tyres down scary steep MTB trails and a fully loaded touring bike on 32mm tyres up and down mountain trails.
    The only limit to the terrain you can ride is your own skill.
    Impressive :O I'm most worried about banging up my wheels tbh (I'm over 100kg).

    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelW View Post
    The only proviso I would have is that the bars are a bit high on most hybrids for off roading and you will get better balance on steep descents with a cross-county style low flat bar.
    Yeah, that's how I have my bike set up. I've always found it more comfortable to have your bar lower than the saddle.

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    149
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Grecs80 View Post
    I did some trail testing last week and I was surprised at how well my Hybrid held up (2012 Giant Roam 1). I tried to take some pics to show the difficulty level of the trails but they didn't come out too good due to being a 1.3 megapixel cell phone.

    The most difficult aspect of these trails were the steep declines and inclines which I found the tires held up well. The rear tired didn't spin out when climbing the steep incline nor did they slide on the decline. The disc brakes worked great too and I found it really easy to control the decent.

    The front suspension was put to the test riding some of the thinner trails that were covered in roots and slippery wet leaves. They worked great!

    I tried to takes as much pics as possible but again due to the low quality, you can't really scale the level of the trails: http://imgur.com/a/Vo6yr#12

    I plan to go with an GoPro HD or ContourHD next time (depending on which I decide to get).
    Good stuff. I very much enjoy mild off roading with skinny tyres.

  15. #15
    I let the dogs out AlphaDogg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    1,889
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My hybrid with 28mm tires usually stays on pavement. If I am feeling risky, I will take it on singletrack.
    http://i736.photobucket.com/albums/x...6at14619PM.jpg
    Quote Originally Posted by rangerdavid View Post
    intellect? we don't need so stinking intellect. this is the 41.
    Quote Originally Posted by eric01 View Post
    And this is why I don't ride aluminum frames... they will explode if I look at it wrong.

  16. #16
    Calamari to go cc_rider's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Falls Church, VA
    My Bikes
    Trek 750
    Posts
    3,103
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    In Baltimore's Fells Point neighborhood there are several quaint cobblestone streets. DC area has some in Georgetown and Old Town Alexandria.

  17. #17
    Banned
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Northern California
    My Bikes
    Raleigh Grand Prix, Giant Innova, Nishiki Sebring, Trek 7.5FX
    Posts
    5,804
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by jbchybridrider View Post
    My hybrid is custom built with little expense spared, there no place I wont take it "Its up to my riding ability really"
    I guarantee you, that there are places in Canada and Utah, where even the most talented, skilled, free-riding, trickster, MTN bikers would have to take a second breath, just to prepare for the mountain descent.

    Most likely, your hybrid would be received at bottom, with grave reviews...

    - Slim
    Last edited by SlimRider; 10-13-11 at 07:35 AM.

  18. #18
    Junior Member qrachel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    LA
    My Bikes
    Just bought a Maring Highway One
    Posts
    11
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I limit my riding to city streets, country roads, decent trails and avoid dealing with very much water. I'm pretty fit, a mature lady who is tall with good muscle definition for a woman; I'd only take on the rougher stuff with a good MTB.

    Rachel

  19. #19
    Two-Wheeled Aficionado ColinL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Wichita
    My Bikes
    Santa Cruz Blur, CX bike, roadie, & others
    Posts
    4,495
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I ride my Quick CX Ultra on singletrack as much as I can. It has a 80mm headshok, which is made by Magura and was Cannondale's best suspension fork until the Lefty appeared around 2005. This fork was on tons of Cannondale MTBs from the late 90s until now.

    The problem with it is narrow tires, which I'm attempting to address, and severe toe / front tire overlap due to my size 12 feet and the short wheelbase.

    If my new 29er tires fit, I am literally going to HTFU and ride around the toe overlap issue. This only happens at extremely low speed when I'm damn near trackstanding and I haven't crashed because of it, but I'm sure that day is coming. On trails like Grecs80 posted I never have overlap problems because I'm not going slow enough to need big steering input.

    If the tires don't fit... I'll be saving my pennies and buy (maybe) or build (most likely) a 29er next winter.

    A third, minor complaint of the bike is that the 26/36/48 chainrings aren't that great for singletrack. They're ok but I don't use the big ring at all, and it is extremely rare I need the granny ring either. I would probably go 1x10 if I build a bike.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •