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  1. #1
    Senior Member ScottieDog's Avatar
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    Upgrading to Shimano SPD pedals

    Hi,

    Decided to upgrade my Felt QX85D Pedals so that I can "Clip In". Am focusing on Shimano (as I have a thing for Shimano and the shoes I want are Shimano - I like things to match LOL).

    Just wondering what the difference is between the "road versions" and the "Mountain Bike Versions" of the SPDs... Some of the mountain bike ones have a cage so you can flip and use normal shoes, ok this is obvious, but overall the road ones look longer and perhaps sleeker, vs the stubby type mountain ones ... Is there any real difference, road ones are generally lighter I suppose, but is there a reason for me to buy Mountain ones over Road or vice versa ? I do ride mostly road of course, but seeing as itīs a Hybrid :-)

    One other thing. I have an interior bike too, at the moment I have exactly the same pedals and clips on the interior as I do on my Felt - I am most likely going to get a pair of SPD Pedals for the indoor too so I can click in my new shoes on both , but most likely a different model of Shimano, will the cleats on the shoes fit both Shimano Pedals ? I know the pedals both come with the cleats, but are they the same fitment ? Or is it best to get the same pedals for both bikes ?

    Considering these for the Felt -
    http://www.leisurelakesbikes.com/pro...aspx?&id=16766

    Considering these for the indoor -
    http://www.bikeos.com/index.php/comp...o-pd-m520.html

    Both are from the Mountain type range, should I be looking at the road ones though ?

  2. #2
    Senior Member John_V's Avatar
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    I don't think that you can go wrong using the SPD pedals and cleats. I have the Shimano SPD M520 MTB pedals on both my bikes. The difference in the Shimano SPD (MTB) and SPD-SL (road) is that the road pedal is a single sided entry pedal where most of the SPD pedals are dual sided entry pedals. This means that with the SPD-SL (as with most road pedals), you must have the pedal upright in order to clip in. On an SPD pedal (excluding the SPD A530), you can clip in on either side. The SPD cleats are also smaller than the SPD-SL cleats and MTB shoes that use them allow you to walk without having to use cleat covers to keep from tearing up your cleats.

    I personally think that the SPD pedals are faster to clip in and out of than most road pedals because of the dual sided entry. All SPD pedals use the same cleat so you would have no problem with using the same shoes on two different style SPD pedals. This is just my opinion, but I would not put clipless pedals on a stationary bike until you get very familiar with riding with clipless pedals on your hybrid. Others may disagree, but my reason is that when you ride your bike with clipless pedals, you learn that you need to unclip before coming to a stop or when having to do other types of maneuvers or you will fall. On a stationary bike, you learn that you won't fall if you stop pedaling and don't unclip, which you can get used to doing if you use the stationary bike more than the hybrid during the winter months. For that reason, getting used to unclipping on the hybrid when you plan on stopping will get you into the habit of unclipping when you stop peddling on the stationary bike. The same thing goes for riding on a trainer.
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  3. #3
    Senior Member a1penguin's Avatar
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    SPD. Get the Shimano M520 pedals. Inexpensive; weight not too bad. I just got a new commuter and did a bit of searching on the forums for SPDs. I was wondering if I wanted to try the 530s (IIRC) that have one side with clips and the other with platform so I don't need cycling shoes. After looking at the different pedals at REI, I decided I wanted the 520s. The clips mount in recessed holes on the bottom of the shoes, so you can easily walk in them. Road pedals might be a bit lighter, but they'll cost a lot more and you can't walk in road shoes.

    The 540 pedals aren't worth the additional $$ for lighter pedals. M520s with clips are $32 on Amazon. From the posts I read, it seems that the really cheap Forte and Wellgo pedals didn't work as well as the Shimano 520s.

    You should be able to find info on the web that tells you what cleats fit what pedals. I think SPD only has two cleats: 51s and 56s. The 56s allow you to pull up to unclip. I actually pull up when I pedal (sometimes :-), so I only use the 51s.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Lexi01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by a1penguin View Post
    I actually pull up when I pedal (sometimes :-), so I only use the 51s.
    I hope some of the pedalling technique nazis aren't reading this ... some people get their noses out of joint and start quoting "scientific" studies that apparently prove pulling up is "wrong". I pull up too...and i reckon it helps a little on takeoff and uphills.

    Regards the rest of the posts...I also think SPDs are the way to go on a hybrid.

    I had these on my hybrid and road bike: http://www.shimano.com.au/publish/co...0.-type-..html

    They seem to have a little more support under your foot which is I think is a good idea (especially if you don't plan on springing $300+ for a pair of carbon-soled shoes to go with them).

    Ultimately I swapped to SPD-SL on the road bike on the physios advice to get rid of a hotspot on my foot that would ache every time I'd try and do a longer ride. Again this was to do with more support needed under the shoe and the SPD-SLs have a larger platform.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

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  5. #5
    Senior Member John_V's Avatar
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    I forgot to mention that with the SPD pedals, you can buy or build your own platform to clip into one side of the pedals for when you want to ride with regular shoes or let someone else use your bike. I have these:

    Decksters 1.jpg Decksters 2.jpg Decksters 3.jpg

    They are made by a company called Winwood and are called Decksters (around $30.00 without the cleats). They are made of aluminum and you simply place a cleat on the bottom and clip them in and out. You do need to put the tension all the way to the max when using them so they don't accidently unclip if you should twist your foot outward. You can also make your own out of aluminum or even plywood. All you will need is the extra cleats and some non-skid material like what you buy to put in a bathtub.
    HCFR Cycling Team
    Ride Safe ... Ride Hard ... Ride Daily

    2012 Colnago Ace
    2010 Giant Cypress


  6. #6
    Senior Member ScottieDog's Avatar
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    Thanks John_V.

    Have to think that dual sided ones are better for me. Appreciate your comment on not using on the indoor bike, makes sense.

    Thanks for the advice. :-)


    Quote Originally Posted by John_V View Post
    I don't think that you can go wrong using the SPD pedals and cleats. I have the Shimano SPD M520 MTB pedals on both my bikes. The difference in the Shimano SPD (MTB) and SPD-SL (road) is that the road pedal is a single sided entry pedal where most of the SPD pedals are dual sided entry pedals. This means that with the SPD-SL (as with most road pedals), you must have the pedal upright in order to clip in. On an SPD pedal (excluding the SPD A530), you can clip in on either side. The SPD cleats are also smaller than the SPD-SL cleats and MTB shoes that use them allow you to walk without having to use cleat covers to keep from tearing up your cleats.

    I personally think that the SPD pedals are faster to clip in and out of than most road pedals because of the dual sided entry. All SPD pedals use the same cleat so you would have no problem with using the same shoes on two different style SPD pedals. This is just my opinion, but I would not put clipless pedals on a stationary bike until you get very familiar with riding with clipless pedals on your hybrid. Others may disagree, but my reason is that when you ride your bike with clipless pedals, you learn that you need to unclip before coming to a stop or when having to do other types of maneuvers or you will fall. On a stationary bike, you learn that you won't fall if you stop pedaling and don't unclip, which you can get used to doing if you use the stationary bike more than the hybrid during the winter months. For that reason, getting used to unclipping on the hybrid when you plan on stopping will get you into the habit of unclipping when you stop peddling on the stationary bike. The same thing goes for riding on a trainer.

  7. #7
    Senior Member ScottieDog's Avatar
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    I see. So MTB shoes wonīt fit to road pedals, and road shoes wont fit to mtb pedals ?

    Thanks for all the advice. Appreciated.

    I was looking at the M530, which are like the 520 but have a small cage around them which helps platform the foot when clicked in (apparently). Also helps protect the binding I suppose, from rocks etc... And is double sided which I think it better for me...

    Quote Originally Posted by a1penguin View Post
    SPD. Get the Shimano M520 pedals. Inexpensive; weight not too bad. I just got a new commuter and did a bit of searching on the forums for SPDs. I was wondering if I wanted to try the 530s (IIRC) that have one side with clips and the other with platform so I don't need cycling shoes. After looking at the different pedals at REI, I decided I wanted the 520s. The clips mount in recessed holes on the bottom of the shoes, so you can easily walk in them. Road pedals might be a bit lighter, but they'll cost a lot more and you can't walk in road shoes.

    The 540 pedals aren't worth the additional $$ for lighter pedals. M520s with clips are $32 on Amazon. From the posts I read, it seems that the really cheap Forte and Wellgo pedals didn't work as well as the Shimano 520s.

    You should be able to find info on the web that tells you what cleats fit what pedals. I think SPD only has two cleats: 51s and 56s. The 56s allow you to pull up to unclip. I actually pull up when I pedal (sometimes :-), so I only use the 51s.

  8. #8
    Senior Member ScottieDog's Avatar
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    LOL on the technique nazis... so true... Wonīt comment on the pulling up yet, as I have never used any yet... Looking forward to the extra power I am told you get with them though.... :-)

    The ones you link are exactly the ones I am getting for the hybrid. Going to hold off on the indoor bike for a month or so, see how I go, then will likely just get the same ones.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lexi01 View Post
    I hope some of the pedalling technique nazis aren't reading this ... some people get their noses out of joint and start quoting "scientific" studies that apparently prove pulling up is "wrong". I pull up too...and i reckon it helps a little on takeoff and uphills.

    Regards the rest of the posts...I also think SPDs are the way to go on a hybrid.

    I had these on my hybrid and road bike: http://www.shimano.com.au/publish/co...0.-type-..html

    They seem to have a little more support under your foot which is I think is a good idea (especially if you don't plan on springing $300+ for a pair of carbon-soled shoes to go with them).

    Ultimately I swapped to SPD-SL on the road bike on the physios advice to get rid of a hotspot on my foot that would ache every time I'd try and do a longer ride. Again this was to do with more support needed under the shoe and the SPD-SLs have a larger platform.

  9. #9
    Senior Member ScottieDog's Avatar
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    Ahh. Thatīs interesting John_V. Thanks.

    Just found some Shimano adapter platforms to do the same too,

    http://www.bikeos.com/index.php/comp...-pd22-spd.html

    Cheers all. Great advice as always. :-))


    Quote Originally Posted by John_V View Post
    I forgot to mention that with the SPD pedals, you can buy or build your own platform to clip into one side of the pedals for when you want to ride with regular shoes or let someone else use your bike. I have these:

    Decksters 1.jpg Decksters 2.jpg Decksters 3.jpg

    They are made by a company called Winwood and are called Decksters (around $30.00 without the cleats). They are made of aluminum and you simply place a cleat on the bottom and clip them in and out. You do need to put the tension all the way to the max when using them so they don't accidently unclip if you should twist your foot outward. You can also make your own out of aluminum or even plywood. All you will need is the extra cleats and some non-skid material like what you buy to put in a bathtub.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Lexi01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScottieDog View Post
    The ones you link are exactly the ones I am getting for the hybrid. Going to hold off on the indoor bike for a month or so, see how I go, then will likely just get the same ones.
    I also think they look pretty cool...not that that was a factor when I bought them...
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

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  11. #11
    Senior Member John_V's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScottieDog View Post
    Ahh. Thatīs interesting John_V. Thanks.

    Just found some Shimano adapter platforms to do the same too,

    http://www.bikeos.com/index.php/comp...-pd22-spd.html

    Cheers all. Great advice as always. :-))
    I purchased those before getting the Decksters. The Shimano platforms are made of hard plastic and the cleat is built in as part of the mold. If you leave them on the pedals, you lose the double entry feature. If you take them off after each use, the cleat will wear faster and not hold as tight. I now use them for night rides since they have a reflector on them and it is one more thing that allows me to be seen.
    HCFR Cycling Team
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    2012 Colnago Ace
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  12. #12
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    Also read up on fitting advice as if the cleats are in the wrong position you may get joint injuries over time. SPDs have some travel and flexibility in them but you will find that even a small adjustment can make a big difference.

    I use Shimano A530 SPD pedals. They have normal pedals on one side for any old shoes and SPD mounts on the other for cycling shoes. I use them with Shimano MT42 SPD shoes, which look like light hiking shoes and also let you clip into the mechanism on the other side if you want to.

    It's a good combo for me.

  13. #13
    Senior Member javal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lexi01 View Post
    I hope some of the pedalling technique nazis aren't reading this ... some people get their noses out of joint and start quoting "scientific" studies that apparently prove pulling up is "wrong". I pull up too...and i reckon it helps a little on takeoff and uphills.

    Regards the rest of the posts...I also think SPDs are the way to go on a hybrid.

    I had these on my hybrid and road bike: http://www.shimano.com.au/publish/co...0.-type-..html

    They seem to have a little more support under your foot which is I think is a good idea (especially if you don't plan on springing $300+ for a pair of carbon-soled shoes to go with them).

    Ultimately I swapped to SPD-SL on the road bike on the physios advice to get rid of a hotspot on my foot that would ache every time I'd try and do a longer ride. Again this was to do with more support needed under the shoe and the SPD-SLs have a larger platform.
    1) Thats actually rather un-scientific. In any case, its not widely known to cyclists.
    2) Theres really only one thing to do to avoid hotspots, and thats a non-fixated foot (or some kind of extreme shoes?).
    3) Ergo; effective pedalling means fixated feet to enhance pulling. Otherwise, go loose and settle with pushing, avoid burning sensations and drop effeciency.
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