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  1. #1
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    Question Hybrid vs Comfort (Giant Cypress or Sedona)

    Hi,

    I was at the bike shop today trying to decide between the Giant Cypress and Giant Sedona. Both were comfortable for the short test ride. It seems like the main difference (or maybe even only difference) between the two is the tires. The Sedona has 26" tires while the Cypress has 700c tires.
    I am a 29 year old male looking for a bike mainly to ride around the neighborhood, parks with bicycle paths and along the beach. My main goals are leisure and fitness. I most likely won't do any mountain biking, downhill,etc and generally prefer staying on "safe" paths. Stability and comfort is also important (if the tires has anything to do with that). I will use it mainly on the weekends (not for commute). If I had to guess my average ride would probably be an hour or so, don't see myself going much longer than that.
    Any thoughts on which bike would be more suitable?

    Thanks in advance!

    Danny
    Last edited by dannydan; 01-07-12 at 11:19 PM.

  2. #2
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    Since you don't envision yourself doing any type of MTN biking and you will primarily remain on "safe" paths. I say, stay away from a suspended fork. A rigid fork and a chromoly steel frame would be most advisable for most hybrids, anyway.

    At that pricepoint you could do so much better with a chromoly steel-framed, Jamis Coda Sport. It's a only a few bucks more...

    - Slim

    PS.

    Of course, for $350, you could get either the Giant Cypress or the Giant Sedona, ST. models.

    www.giant-bicycles.com/en-us/bikes/models/sedona.st/9025/48885/

    www.giant-bicycles.com/en-us/bikes/models/cypress.st/9019/48871/

    * These Are Hi-Tensile Steel Framed Bikes. That means that they are slightly heavier in mass than chromoly, but just as strong and durable. Each will last a lifetime, if kept dry.
    Last edited by SlimRider; 01-08-12 at 12:17 AM.

  3. #3
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    Thanks!
    Why stay away from the suspended fork btw? Isn't it better if you hit holes, switch from sidewalk to road (height difference), etc?

  4. #4
    Trek DS 8.4 Rider! zerogravity's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dannydan View Post
    Thanks!
    Why stay away from the suspended fork btw? Isn't it better if you hit holes, switch from sidewalk to road (height difference), etc?
    To answer your question Danny, those little holes really aren't that big of a deal with a rigid fork. The only time i open up my suspended fork is when i go mountain biking and there are a lot of drops and over 20mph+ Downhills or even on Single Tracks. Anything else isn't really needed. The less expensive bikes have very soft dampening on their forks and can actually be unsafe on the road when you open them up. Mine dips A LOT when i use my front brakes! If i turn my bar suddenly, the fork will DIP and cause the bike to lose control...not a safe feeling. This is with pre-load all the way up. As you mentioned, if your aren't doing anything like downhills on the dirt where there are big drops and rocks, a suspended fork on a budget priced bike is not only heavier but not as strong and sturdy as a rigid fork. Either way, get what makes you happy. Hopefully these suggestions help you to decide what you would like to get.
    ''Many of life's failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up.''-- Thomas Alva Edison

  5. #5
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    Decisions decisions...
    I have to say with so many choices it's very difficult!
    This is my first bike so it's important for me to get something that I'll enjoy riding and hopefully will last at least a few years. I noticed the Trek Navigator may also suit my needs, again this one is a 26".

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by dannydan View Post
    Decisions decisions...
    I have to say with so many choices it's very difficult!
    This is my first bike so it's important for me to get something that I'll enjoy riding and hopefully will last at least a few years. I noticed the Trek Navigator may also suit my needs, again this one is a 26".
    Hey there Danny,

    It seems you're having some difficulty in deciding how to approach buying a bike. Well, allow me to assist you please.

    First of all, you're doing well by already knowing the type of terrain or land surfaces that you'll traverse. That alone is good. The next step is to decide the type of bike that you want, or decide upon the bike that best suits your needs. Well, you've pretty much have decided that one too. You'd like to have a hybrid! That's great, because from what you've stated, you won't be riding for extended periods of time and it pretty much sounds like you'll be a recreational and exercise cyclist. Therefore, the hybrid/comfort bike is the one for you. So there, that's been decided by you, as well. So you're really doing great in the indepedent decision department!

    The first step really should have been to decide upon your optimum budget ceiling.

    In other words...

    What's the most you're willing to spend?

    I'll tell ya right now. The more you spend, the better the bike and the more enjoyment you're going to have. For a hybrid, I would suggest keeping your expenses somewhere between five and fifteen hundred dollars, if you're buying new from a bicycle shop.

    Of course, you could always try to buy cheaper from places online like:

    1) www.bikesdirect.com or 2) www.nashbar.com or 3) www.performancebike.com

    Also, for folks who are patient and know something about bike components, frames, sizing, and inspection, there's always Craigslist. Of course, you should be very skeptical and hesitant about purchasing any carbon fiber or aluminum framed bicycle off of Craigslist, not knowing the history of such materials. Always buy chromoly steel bikes off of CL!

    Once you've decided upon your budget, then you decide upon the type of frame material that you want for your bike. Chromoly steel is the best hybrid bicycle frame material in my opinion. It's strong, durable, and light weight. It's fatigue life is longer than that of aluminum and its yield capacity is greater, as well. That means, that steel will prefer to bend in an accident as opposed to snap or break off and act as a spear or impaler. Unlike carbon, steel has no impact resistance problems. Steel has never been known to shatter upon impact. On the other hand, carbon fiber does have that history, unfortunately.

    Good Luck With Your Decisions!

    - Slim

    PS.

    Most chromoly steel-frame bikes will last a lifetime, if kept dry. Nobody can say that about any other frame material other than Titanium.
    Last edited by SlimRider; 01-08-12 at 05:01 AM.

  7. #7
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    Hi!
    Thanks for all the info! I'm looking to spend around $500. I may be able to stretch that a bit but I don't want to get too invested since I'm just getting into this and I may find my requirements change (or maybe god forbid I won't enjoy it as much as I had thought and they'll end up in the garage). For that budget I think I will have to compromise for aluminum, correct me if I'm wrong...

    It's true I've narrowed it down to hybrid / comfort but choosing between them seems to be where I'm stuck at right now
    If I understand correctly it boils down to 26" vs 700c wheels. Not sure which is better suited for my needs. When I've "test drived" the Giant Sedona (26") and Giant Cypress (700c) they were both equally comfortable in a 5 minute ride on the lot...

    Are there any other bike types I should consider? What are your thoughts about the Trek FX? They seem very popular but not sure if suited for my needs...

  8. #8
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    Seems to be some confusion as to what a "Hybrid" bike is. Is it more like the Trek FX or the Trek 7000 series / Giant Cypress?
    From what I can tell the latter is more comfortable while the former is more sporty...

  9. #9
    Super Moderator no1mad's Avatar
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    1. You've pretty much nailed the primary difference between the Sedona and Cypress on the wheels.

    2. Suspension forks at price point you're shopping is false economics. They invariably lack lock out, are heavier, will rob you of top end speed, has to be maintained, and is one more moving part that could potentially fail. Wider tires, decent grips (Ergon's rock), and gloves with gel inserts will give you plenty of comfort.

    3. Since this is your first bike purchase, I'd advise you to stay away from bikesdirect and other online sources. Any adjustments or tweaking would have to be done by you (and you might have to invest in some specific tool(s) to do so), take it to the LBS anyway, or worse yet, ship it back- after waiting for a RMA confirmation.

    4. Buying from the LBS allows you to test ride before you buy, the initial set-up/fine tuning to ensure fit is generally free, and most shops include some sort of service after the sale for free as well. What type and for how long will vary.

    5. Don't get caught up in the frame material war at this point nor the component one either. You'll likely not notice the characteristics of frame material within your budget (except maybe for weight) or the performance of the components like Alivio, Altus, Deore. FIT is the key- you will notice if you're too cramped or too stretched out.

    6. If you're now considering the lower end of the Trek FX line (and that brand is overpriced IMO), then that opens things up a bit into the 'urban' and 'fitness' spectrum of the hybrid universe. I could throw make/models out, but I don't know what is available to you locally.

    7. Don't know if you have a REI near you, but strongly consider buying from them. From all accounts, their return policy is outstanding. If you get something and find you don't like it, they'll take it back. And if you get their Novara house brand, then you are golden as far as warranty goes. There was a poster up in commuting who had a Novara bike that he bought more than 2 years ago (think it was closer to 5 or 6), trashed the frame in a collision, didn't have a receipt, REI couldn't find a record of the sale in their system... and they still gave him credit towards a new bike!
    Quote Originally Posted by Cyril View Post
    Ride what and in what manner pleases you. Those that mind don't matter, and those that matter don't mind. srsly.
    Community guidelines

  10. #10
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    Thanks no1mad!
    If I understand correctly, I should look at the Cypress model without suspension. Trek's 7xxx series also looks interesting but they all have suspension as well...
    I don't know if the FX is the right bike for me. Calories are more important than miles for now, so I don't mind going a shorter distance (but not shorter time) as long as it's comfortable. It's not like I need to get from point A to B, I can always make a U turn and head back home / to the car...

  11. #11
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    Hi there Danny!

    No1Mad has given you great advice. If you don't have an REI near you, then hopefully there's a Jamis dealership near you. IMO, Jamis has the most reasonably priced bikes of all the major bicycle manufacturers. If there's no Jamis dealership, then I would suggest that you find a bicycle co-op and buy online. The co-op will assist you in the final assembly of your bicycle, once it has arrived at your home or destination.

    Therefore, your choices are as follows:

    1) A reasonably priced Jamis bike, purchased at a Jamis dealership. Preferably a Coda Sport.

    2) A reasonably priced Schwinn Signature bike, purchased from a dealership that carries Schwinn. NOT WALMART, K-Mart, or Target! It must be a Signature Schwinn Bike!

    3) A bike purchased online from Bikesdirect, Nashbar, or Performance (with the help of a co-op).

    4) The Giant Cypress ST or Giant Sedona ST purchased from a Giant dealership at an approximate cost of $350.

    5) * Be patient. Find a friend who knows about bikes. Have them assist you in finding a nice used chromoly steel-framed bicycle at a cost less than $300, from your local Craigslist.

    * This is most probably your best option.

    Good Luck!

    - Slim

    PS.

    Check this one out!

    www.bikesdirect.com/products/motobecane/cafe_latte_x.htm
    Last edited by SlimRider; 01-08-12 at 01:13 PM.

  12. #12
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    I was in your shoes earlier this year when i was looking for a hybrid for family riding and commuting.

    I ended up with the Giant Cypress over the Sedona due to the 700c tires. I wasn't too concerned with speed as i was more concerned with comfort for this type of riding and i also already have a road bike i picked up from craigslist so i opted for the suspension fork. This has made my commute a bit more comfortable as some of the roads along the way are horrible.

    You mentioned a budget of around $500, just keep in mind any accessories you may want to include in your budget. My LBS gave me 25% off any accessories when i purchased my Cypress so i opted for a rear rack and light kit.

    Good luck with your decision!
    2014 Trek Madone 5.2

  13. #13
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    Just a personal perception, to me, (IMHO), 700c wheels just seem to "roll easier" than 26 in. wheels. After having several bikes with both wheel sizes, I'd go with a 700c wheel'ed machine. I ride a 2012 Jamis Coda Sport, which I consider a, "flat bar road bike", just me, I'd NEVER take my Coda Sport on "dirt" just too nice a bike to flog. I picked up a sweet 2004 Canonndale Adventure 1000 for a $150.00 off Craigs List so the wife and I can ride some of the local "dirt" paths (NO MTB'ING), IF you get a bike with front suspension, do yourself a BIG favor and make sure you can, "LOCKOUT" the fork for "paved road" use and unlock the fork for "rutted dirt path" useage, again JMHO. Have FUN and enjoy whatever you end up on! (PS, both the bikes have 700c wheels, the Coda Sport runs, 700Cx28 road tires, the Adventure 1000 runs, 700Cx38 semi-knoby tires.)
    Take care, RIDE SAFE, have FUN!
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    1993 Mongoose Switchback MTB, converted to a "comfort bike"! :)

  14. #14
    Senior Member Bill Kapaun's Avatar
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    For "street use", either bike would be much better with "skinnier" tires.
    The 35C is a relative "slug", compared to a 26/28C size.
    Ditto with the 1.95" compared to a high pressure 1.25".

    I put these (relatively inexpensive) tires on my 2 bikes and the difference was amazing.
    http://www.biketiresdirect.com/produ...et-runner-tire
    http://www.biketiresdirect.com/produ...t-tire-folding
    You'll need to invest in an adequate floor pump to keep them topped off.

    Also, if you don't do steep hills, I'd change the Free Wheel to something more like a 13/14-26/28

  15. #15
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    You should definitely look into the Giant Escape 1 and Escape 2. I have the 2012 Escape 1 for 6months now, got it for under $500. It is perfect for paved roads and unpaved dirt trails.

    http://www.giant-bicycles.com/en-us/....1/8910/48613/

  16. #16
    Senior Member xoxoxoxoLive's Avatar
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    The key to Craigslist is ( PATIENCE ), and knowing what you are looking at. This was in mint condition, cost 300.00 dollars...

  17. #17
    Senior Member xoxoxoxoLive's Avatar
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    Both of these TARGET .. 199.00 & 249.00

    Richard

  18. #18
    Senior Member xoxoxoxoLive's Avatar
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    Craigslist 65.00 Dollars ( 2 weeks ago.. )

    Thanks to Craigslist I went through probably 20 or more bikes in the first year of riding, ( NEVER ) lost a penny on one. And is great opportunity to own a lot of different style bikes. My 2 favorites are Schwinn Trailways ( Target ) and Giant Rincon ( Craigslist ). Richard

  19. #19
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  20. #20
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    Danny,

    I bought a new Sedona in 2010, it has the aluminun frame and suspension fork. I have ridden it about 1300 miles. I've broken one rear spoke, the dealer quickly replaced it. It is a good bike to start on. If I were to do it again, I would purchase the steel framed model with rigid fork with 36 spokes per wheel. I ride on a variety of rural roads and have found that I do prefer a steel frame. I'm 200 pounds plus and inflate my tires to 80 psi. The bike really coasts nicely. BTW, the suspended seat post was removed the first month, I didn't like the movement. I'm not even close to having the new wore off on it, it will out last me.

    BobH.

  21. #21
    Saving gas on my commute Scooby214's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xoxoxoxoLive View Post
    Thanks to Craigslist I went through probably 20 or more bikes in the first year of riding, ( NEVER ) lost a penny on one. And is great opportunity to own a lot of different style bikes. My 2 favorites are Schwinn Trailways ( Target ) and Giant Rincon ( Craigslist ). Richard
    For $65, this bike is a steal. My first real bike purchase was a Sierra GS. Mine looks a bit different, due to being an XL frame. I outgrew the upright posture, suspension seatpost and fork, low gearing, etc. I still have the bike, though I've changed many things on it since purchase. I like it better now that it has a rigid CroMo fork, faster gearing, better shifters, new stem and bars, rigid seatpost, faster tires...

    I hope you get the idea. The Sierra GS is similar to the Sedona. My wife has the Sedona. Her bike came with slightly better components. The Sedona suits her casual riding style nicely, though I anticipate that even she will become ready for a more performance oriented bike in the near future. If you start wishing to do longer rides, you may find the low-end suspension fork found on the aluminum frame Sedona or the Cypress will suck away some of your pedaling force when pushing yourself. Riding posture is a matter of preference, but many find that the bolt upright posture of the bikes mentioned above rob you of efficiency when riding at higher speeds, especially in windy conditions.

    Getting either the Sedona ST or the Cypress ST will solve the fork issues, but they are still set up for an upright posture. Be sure to try out bikes with different postures before purchasing the Sedona or the Cypress.

  22. #22
    Senior Member xoxoxoxoLive's Avatar
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    Thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by Scooby214 View Post
    For $65, this bike is a steal. My first real bike purchase was a Sierra GS. Mine looks a bit different, due to being an XL frame. I outgrew the upright posture, suspension seatpost and fork, low gearing, etc. I still have the bike, though I've changed many things on it since purchase. I like it better now that it has a rigid CroMo fork, faster gearing, better shifters, new stem and bars, rigid seatpost, faster tires...

    I hope you get the idea. The Sierra GS is similar to the Sedona. My wife has the Sedona. Her bike came with slightly better components. The Sedona suits her casual riding style nicely, though I anticipate that even she will become ready for a more performance oriented bike in the near future. If you start wishing to do longer rides, you may find the low-end suspension fork found on the aluminum frame Sedona or the Cypress will suck away some of your pedaling force when pushing yourself. Riding posture is a matter of preference, but many find that the bolt upright posture of the bikes mentioned above rob you of efficiency when riding at higher speeds, especially in windy conditions.

    Getting either the Sedona ST or the Cypress ST will solve the fork issues, but they are still set up for an upright posture. Be sure to try out bikes with different postures before purchasing the Sedona or the Cypress.
    I could not believe the price myself, also came with bill of sale from LBS and was made out to the seller. I really am enjoying the comfort style ride it gives.

  23. #23
    Senior Member xoxoxoxoLive's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dannydan View Post
    Hi,

    I was at the bike shop today trying to decide between the Giant Cypress and Giant Sedona. Both were comfortable for the short test ride. It seems like the main difference (or maybe even only difference) between the two is the tires. The Sedona has 26" tires while the Cypress has 700c tires.
    I am a 29 year old male looking for a bike mainly to ride around the neighborhood, parks with bicycle paths and along the beach. My main goals are leisure and fitness. I most likely won't do any mountain biking, downhill,etc and generally prefer staying on "safe" paths. Stability and comfort is also important (if the tires has anything to do with that). I will use it mainly on the weekends (not for commute). If I had to guess my average ride would probably be an hour or so, don't see myself going much longer than that.
    Any thoughts on which bike would be more suitable?

    Thanks in advance!

    Danny
    Sorry for getting off your OP ! WOW tuff choice, I looked up both of them, ( I ) would probably go for the Cypress based on what you posted. But what really matters most, is if you like it. Richard : 0

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scooby214 View Post
    For $65, this bike is a steal. My first real bike purchase was a Sierra GS. Mine looks a bit different, due to being an XL frame. I outgrew the upright posture, suspension seatpost and fork, low gearing, etc. I still have the bike, though I've changed many things on it since purchase. I like it better now that it has a rigid CroMo fork, faster gearing, better shifters, new stem and bars, rigid seatpost, faster tires...

    I hope you get the idea. The Sierra GS is similar to the Sedona. My wife has the Sedona. Her bike came with slightly better components. The Sedona suits her casual riding style nicely, though I anticipate that even she will become ready for a more performance oriented bike in the near future. If you start wishing to do longer rides, you may find the low-end suspension fork found on the aluminum frame Sedona or the Cypress will suck away some of your pedaling force when pushing yourself. Riding posture is a matter of preference, but many find that the bolt upright posture of the bikes mentioned above rob you of efficiency when riding at higher speeds, especially in windy conditions.

    Getting either the Sedona ST or the Cypress ST will solve the fork issues, but they are still set up for an upright posture. Be sure to try out bikes with different postures before purchasing the Sedona or the Cypress.
    Upright's the best way to ride. You can see what's around you.
    That which does not kill me has made a massive tactical blunder.
    Too often I would hear men boast of the miles covered that day, rarely of what they had seen. Louis L'Amour
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  25. #25
    Senior Member Pistard's Avatar
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    Hi there, for $550, you can get a great comfort hybrid from Jamis with great components, like the Citizen line. I am very happy with that as my first choice going back into cycling after many Years. You will rarely hear any negs on Jamis bicycles.
    Of course , I am already shoping for a "road" bike also....

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