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  1. #1
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    Advice on Trek 7000

    Hi: I recently took on bicycling as a weekend activity after many years of not owning a bike. I originally purchased the 2012 Schwinn Voyageur 21 at Performance but, after two days of relatively easy riding, one of the pedals fell off! This left quite a sour taste, so I decided to take it back to the store and get a refund - the bike was probably not put together properly, but why take second chances?

    Today, I bought a Trek 7000 for about the same price. Although the rear gears are a cheaper model (Shimano TX vs Altus), the bike seems to have a more solid ride and handling. However, since I'm nowhere near an expert on bikes, I have a few doubts:

    1. Did I make the right choice in switching from the Schwinn to Trek? And will this be a reliable bike?

    2. I'm 5'9" and the salesman said the 20" frame size was right for me (instead of the 17.5"). When I'm riding the bike size feels fine and manageable, but it does feel a bit tall when trying to get on and off. For instance, when I'm on the seat with my leg fully extended, my foot doesn't completely lie flat on the ground (just my toes) - and the seat won't go any lower. Is this normal? If not, could I remedy this by finding a seat that will go a little lower (~2")?

    On this last point, the Schwinn was definitely more comfortable when getting on and off. I don't mind the new fit too much, but just want to make sure that there will be no adverse physical effects after riding for a while.

    Thanks for your advice.

  2. #2
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    Most bikes when properly fit won't let you put your feet flat on the ground when in the saddle. One exception is the Trek Pure series, and that is a specific advertised feature.

    I'm 6' even and I fit to a 20". That being said I ended up with a 22.5" 7100 (Craigslist deal) and am much the same, my leg extension is right when the saddle is all the way down. The only issue I have is the stand over is very close. To ball park where the saddle should be, sit in the saddle and put your heel on the peddle. Adjust so that your leg is straight when doing that. That way you will have a slight bend in your knee when pedaling normally. Riding lower than that can lead to knee discomfort.

    It will seem weird at first, but long term it is way better for your knees. It helps when getting on to stand over the top tube, move a pedal to about 2 o'clock, and push on the pedal while hopping up. It will slide the bike under you, and has the advantage of taking off right as you mount the bike. I dismount similarly by putting one foot on a pedal at the lowest point, lifting up off the saddle, and stepping forward to the ground when the bike stops. After trying once or twice it becomes pretty easy.

  3. #3
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    I am 70 years old. I ride a Trek 7000 that I bought new in 2005. My wife rides a Trek 7000 step through frame bike I bought for her in April 2011.
    My 7000 now has over 10,000 miles on it.
    This is a 17.5 inch frame bike.
    I stand 5'10" tall.
    My inseam is 30 inches.
    I have about 5 inches of seat post showing above the top of the seat post tube.
    When I sit on the seat only the balls of my feet touch the ground. Seat height is adjusted to me me the correct angle on the knee at the bottom of the pedal stroke. Both knees have degenerative joint disease. Some tissue hardened and some frayed in the knee joints. Knee angle during pedal rotation is critical when it comes to my knees on a long ride. A short ride for the 2 of us is 30 to 40 miles a day. A good ride is 50 to 60 and last year we did 70 miles in one day. No problems after the ride other than being a little tired.

    With my wife's Trek 7000 I just had the elcheapo stock Shimano rear derailler replaced. She put 2,500 miles on the bike in 14 months of use. Rode right through the warm winter. Replaced with a more expensive and durable model. Also replaced the original freewheel and chain at the same time.

    You comment about possibly looking for a seat that will go a little lower.
    You might want to look at dumping the stock seat post with the spring in it. Once they start to wear you will find the nose of the seat shifting from side to side as you pedal. They use a plastic washer with a key slot that wears. I put a regular no spring seat post in mine. That would give you a bit more adjustment in getting the seat lower if needed.

    I finally had to replace the rear wheel on my 7000. Hub bearing races a bit worn. Spokes had reached the end of their useful life. Had two break while riding. Cost me $64 to replace it with a newer Trek rear wheel. Given the 10,000 plus miles I can't complain about that. A rack and big bags on the back. Some days I am using it for a mule in hauling groceries or beer.

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    Thank you for both both of your replies. The explanation around mounting and dismounting the bike is exactly what the salesperson at the store explained. I guess I was just used to staying on my seat when stopping.

    Currently though, the stand-over is quite tight: there's basically less than half an inch of space between the top pipe and my crotch, when the recommended distance is around one to two inches. Should this be a cause for concern or a sign that the frame might not be the right size? Even though the next size down, 17.5", might be too small.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by ralphch View Post
    Thank you for both both of your replies. The explanation around mounting and dismounting the bike is exactly what the salesperson at the store explained. I guess I was just used to staying on my seat when stopping.

    Currently though, the stand-over is quite tight: there's basically less than half an inch of space between the top pipe and my crotch, when the recommended distance is around one to two inches. Should this be a cause for concern or a sign that the frame might not be the right size? Even though the next size down, 17.5", might be too small.
    You should go try the smaller bike in order to make a determination.

    When you get the chance, you should upgrade your drivetrain and get a more comfortable saddle. Tiagra derailleurs should suit you just fine!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by ralphch View Post
    Thank you for both both of your replies. The explanation around mounting and dismounting the bike is exactly what the salesperson at the store explained. I guess I was just used to staying on my seat when stopping.

    Currently though, the stand-over is quite tight: there's basically less than half an inch of space between the top pipe and my crotch, when the recommended distance is around one to two inches. Should this be a cause for concern or a sign that the frame might not be the right size? Even though the next size down, 17.5", might be too small.
    I don't know hybrids, but generally speaking stand-over is nonsense. It's like fitting a suit based upon the sleeve buttons. Your focus should be pedaling position - saddle to spndle- and your reach in a neutral a riding position, not stand-over. (You plan to sole pedal the bike like Fred Flintstone? - then worry about standover.) 20" sounds big, how is your reach?

    enjoy the bike.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by ralphch View Post
    Currently though, the stand-over is quite tight: there's basically less than half an inch of space between the top pipe and my crotch, when the recommended distance is around one to two inches. Should this be a cause for concern or a sign that the frame might not be the right size? Even though the next size down, 17.5", might be too small.
    IMO, stand-over height recommendations are written by lawyers. I'd be much more concerned about how comfortable I felt on the bike. I'm also 5'9" and 20" Trek hybrid frames feel perfect to me (the 17.5" feels too small.) If your cycling inseam (not pant inseam) measures 30" or less the 17.5" may be a better option for you.
    Last edited by Dunbar; 06-14-12 at 12:49 AM.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by SlimRider View Post
    Tiagra derailleurs should suit you just fine!
    I'm not sure I'd do Tiagra on a 7000 series, although I put Altus on my 7100 (more because I didn't like the grip shifters, and the SRAM one wasn't compatible with the Shimano controls I chose). But my 7100 had brake levers with plastic bodies which needed upgrading. Maybe the newer ones have better levers now, but the plastic bodied ones wore out around the screw fitting that lets you adjust the brakes, so that they couldn't be adjusted at all. Between my wife and I we have two 7100's, which we got used, but didn't have much mileage on them, and both sets of brake levers were like that. New levers are pretty cheap (easily less tha $10 each), and pretty easy to replace.

    I would say use your bike and get used to it, but keep an eye on the levers and be prepared to replace them.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ralphch View Post
    I originally purchased the 2012 Schwinn Voyageur 21 at Performance but, after two days of relatively easy riding, one of the pedals fell off!
    This is pretty common for plastic pedals. On the most expensive bike, if the pedals are plastic, they will break off eventually (sooner rather than later). Easily replaced.

    Did I make the right choice in switching from the Schwinn to Trek? And will this be a reliable bike?
    Trek is considered a reliable, trusted brand. Schwinn is said to have lost their credibility years ago, but I personally think they still make at least some good stuff.

    ... when I'm on the seat with my leg fully extended, my foot doesn't completely lie flat on the ground (just my toes) - and the seat won't go any lower. Is this normal?
    Completely normal. But if you're lowering your seat all the way just to get your toes on the ground, go for the smaller frame. If you find it to be too small, raise the seat.

    ... just want to make sure that there will be no adverse physical effects after riding for a while.
    From my experience, going from a large framed bike (I believe it was 23") down to a smaller 19", I started feeling pain in my shoulders a bit after a mile or two (probably as a result of raising the seat). I'm 6'1". I'll be getting a 21" soon.

  10. #10
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    Hi all, thanks for your excellent advice. After riding some more this weekend, I decided that the 20" frame is the right size and going to 17.5" will probably be too small. By looking around town at other "more pro" riders, I have noticed that their bikes have a similar fit to mine: when sitting, the toes reach the ground, but the entire foot does not lie flat, and they simply hop off and forward from the seat when fully stopped.

    Just to correct my original post: When I had the Schwinn, it was actually the entire crank-arm that fell off. Probably not a fault of the bike itself, but of its poor assembly. Having this happen with only two days of riding definitely tarnished the Schwinn experience.

    The Trek 7000 comes with the Shimano TX rear derailleur, which is very cheap, cheaper than the Shimano Altus the Schwinn had. I'm surprised Trek wouldn't at least have a better derailleur, so I'll probably end up replacing it in the future.

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