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  1. #1
    Recreational/Utility bjjoondo's Avatar
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    Flat Bar Road Bike or Hybrid??

    I've had my Jamis Coda Sport and Allegro 1 called both a "flat bar road bike" and a "hybrid", so what's the REAL difference?? If they are "flat bar road bikes", then why do "roadies" look at them with such distane?? If they are "hybrids" then why does everyone, seem to want to tell you, that it's "not a true hybrid, it's a flat bar road bike"?

    I take it cause it has what are basicly "MTB deralliures", (Acera and SRAM X3) and a 32 tooth cassette, it's considered a "hybrid"? Still seems like the frame is much more, "road bike" and with 700c wheels and 700cX25 tires, I too like the term, "flat bar road bike". Oh wait it's got Straight bars and trigger shifters, so it must be a "hybrid", LOL no wonder the other bike style riders "look down" on my choice of bicycles. Oh well, I'll just ride on into the sunset with my head slung low!
    Last edited by bjjoondo; 06-25-12 at 02:35 PM. Reason: reword
    Take care, RIDE SAFE, have FUN!
    B.J. Ondo
    2011 Jamis Allegro 1

  2. #2
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    I don't know the 'according to Hoyle' definition, but to me, a hybrid usually means a more mountain bike-like position, a 'something through 32' cassette, a rear derailleur usually used on a mountain bike and something in the range of 42 or 44 for the big front ring. I used to think of a hybrid as having 26" wheels, but it seems there are several bikes that have 700c wheels that are being called a hybrid. Also, I think if a front suspension fork is present, it's a hybrid, not a flat bar road bike.

    A flat bar road bike means to me a quicker, more nimble bike, usually 28 to 35mm tires, a cassette with a maximum rear of around 28 and a big front ring in the 46-52 range.

    I had a Coda Sport or Comp for a while.. I forget which it was, but it was dark blue, had Reynolds tubing and a 30/42/52 front and something like a 11-32 rear. With the 30 front, I changed it to an 11-26 as I mostly rode a traditional road bike and preferred the smaller steps in gearing. The bike felt MUCH more nimble than most of the 'hybrids' I've ridden. I don't split hairs and just tend to enjoy what I have, but I would absolutely call it a flat bar road bike.

    Bottom line, I think naysayers from either side will point out the short-comings of whatever bike type they DON'T own while some riders just enjoy what they have and what works for them.
    Last edited by cratz2; 06-26-12 at 02:48 AM.

  3. #3
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    IMHO the difference between a flat bar road bike vs a super light modified mtb vs a "hyrbid" is nil. If it weighs about the same, has similar geometry and gearing then its functionally the same.

  4. #4
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    Hey BJ!

    You're the proud owner of a hybrid. Therefore, pick that smiling face up and shine your pride to world!

    BTW

    A hybrid is defined as a bike that blends the best characteristics of both road and mountain bikes, into bikes that are sturdy, comfortable, fast, and ideal for riding on streets and bike paths. Therefore, a bike that has a little more mountain flavor than road, is still a hybrid. A bike that has a little more road flavor than mountain is still a hybrid.

    That said, what I really disapprove of, are hybrids with front suspended forks. At what point do you get so close to being a mountain bike, but still not be called a mountain bike!

    Besides, most roadies are self-indulgent narcissistic weight weenies, anyways! So who cares what they think?

    What's most important, is what you think!



    * Any bike with a suspended fork should be called a mountain bike!
    Last edited by SlimRider; 06-25-12 at 07:20 PM.

  5. #5
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    Who cares what people call it as long as you enjoy riding it? Besides--just call it "my bike," and that's the most important thing...


  6. #6
    Senior Member Lexi01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SlimRider View Post
    Hey BJ!

    You're the proud owner of a hybrid. Therefore, pick that smiling face up and shine your pride to world!

    BTW

    A hybrid is defined as a bike that blends the best characteristics of both road and mountain bikes, into bikes that are sturdy, comfortable, fast, and ideal for riding on streets and bike paths. Therefore, a bike that has a little more mountain flavor than road, is still a hybrid. A bike that has a little more road flavor than mountain is still a hybrid.

    That said, what I really disapprove of, are hybrids with front suspended forks. At what point do you get so close to being a mountain bike, but still not be called a mountain bike!

    Besides, most roadies are self-indulgent narcissistic weight weenies, anyways! So who cares what they think?

    What's most important, is what you think!



    * Any bike with a suspended fork should be called a mountain bike!
    I have a Scott Sportster 20...it has front suspension (only 62mm) and its well and truly a hybrid...

    Frankly, I reckon if the bike is lacking front suspension it can't be referred to as a hybrid - I.e. you'd find it pretty hard to ride on all terrain. I take mine on the road for 30km to get to a nice little MTB park, flick on the front susp. then take it on single track for an hour or so then back onto the road to get home...

    That, to me, is the essence of a hybrid. It goes anywhere...

  7. #7
    Senior Member Terrierman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lexi01 View Post
    I have a Scott Sportster 20...it has front suspension (only 62mm) and its well and truly a hybrid...

    Frankly, I reckon if the bike is lacking front suspension it can't be referred to as a hybrid - I.e. you'd find it pretty hard to ride on all terrain. I take mine on the road for 30km to get to a nice little MTB park, flick on the front susp. then take it on single track for an hour or so then back onto the road to get home...

    That, to me, is the essence of a hybrid. It goes anywhere...
    Wifey poo has one of those. She really likes it. I have a Coda Elite. I really like it. Imagine that, happiness and tranquility. We also have a pair of Scott Speedsters and I have a Felt 29'er. Bases covered.
    It's all downhill from here. Except the parts that are uphill.

  8. #8
    Mixte Power! Arrowana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lexi01 View Post
    Frankly, I reckon if the bike is lacking front suspension it can't be referred to as a hybrid - I.e. you'd find it pretty hard to ride on all terrain. I take mine on the road for 30km to get to a nice little MTB park, flick on the front susp. then take it on single track for an hour or so then back onto the road to get home...

    That, to me, is the essence of a hybrid. It goes anywhere...
    Bikes such as this are still considered MTBs, despite not having a suspension fork. So I see no reason a suspension fork should be required to call a bike a hybrid.

    For me to think of a bike as a flat-bar road bike instead of a hybrid, it usually has skinny tires, same or close to the same gearing as a road bike, many of the same components as a road bike, and often a carbon fork. The Fuji Absolute 1.0 would be a good example of this, though I still won't fault someone for calling it a hybrid.

  9. #9
    Recreational/Utility bjjoondo's Avatar
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    The FUNNY thing is that back in the early 80's, if you switched out to "thinner road style" tires on your old MTB, it was called a "CITY BIKE", LOL, where did "Hybird" come from??
    Take care, RIDE SAFE, have FUN!
    B.J. Ondo
    2011 Jamis Allegro 1

  10. #10
    Senior Member
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    years ago i changed my 70's 10 speed puch to an 8 speed triple, 27" wheels [laced on a 8 speed hub], 1 1/8" tires, hybrid front fork with v brake up front, flat bars and trigger shift. just finished a bianchi early 90's advantage hybrid, 9 speed triple trigger shift, 700c 28 tires with the original canti brakes. call them what you want their great for my 10 miles daily run. 67 and still riding.

  11. #11
    Member Andy2302's Avatar
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    My Devinci Milano has a Mfg sticker identifying it as a Comfort Hybrid pasted to the frame.
    Straight bars, front suspension with street tires. Roadies pass me all the time but I'm old, who cares.

  12. #12
    Ha ha ha ha ha giantcfr1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SlimRider View Post
    ...
    [/U]A hybrid is defined as a bike that blends the best characteristics of both road and mountain bikes, into bikes that are sturdy, comfortable, fast, and ideal for riding on streets and bike paths. Therefore, a bike that has a little more mountain flavor than road, is still a hybrid. A bike that has a little more road flavor than mountain is still a hybrid.

    ...
    I'm with your definition.

  13. #13
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    I think the distinction is more marketing than anything else. It makes choices easier to make for the consumer if you neatly categorize bicycles by general characteristics and their intended purpose. When buying a bike however, I see no reason to pay too much attention to what it is called, and would primarily focus on whether it has the characteristics that you prefer. Whether they call something a "hybrid" or "cyclocross" does not really mean that they are in essence all that different, and you would do well to pick the one that you think has the best features and riding position.

    This is part personal preference, part riding conditions, maybe even aesthetics may play a role. Do you want a suspended fork? Would you benefit from having it? What size tires do you want and why? I would answer these questions and then buy a bike appropriate for me.

  14. #14
    Ha ha ha ha ha giantcfr1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bjjoondo View Post
    ...where did "Hybird" come from??

    I think it was when the MTBs started generating electric energy which is fed back into the legs through braking.
    I`m sure I read that somewhere.

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