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  1. #1
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    Scott Sportster 50 XL 2012

    My ordeal with a cheaper bike is now finished. I tried the Scott Speedster 50 XL 2012 for size (187cm/80kg) and it fits. I would be riding it recreationally, mostly on asphalt, but in my city you can't call that a smooth ride so I like the front suspension.

    Is there something fundamentally wrong with it?

    ps. Please note my location and that my choices are limited. I welcome other suggestions, but most likely they'd be in vain...

    pps. And please be quick about it I'm itching to get back on the road!

  2. #2
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    To each his own I suppose...

    But I wouldn't go for a sus fork for mostly paved riding, pretty much regardless the condition of the pavement.

    And what you've got there looks like a typical MTB geometry. Nothing wrong with that, but I'm quite certain I've got a steeper angle on my urban/intercity commuter. (old rigid MTB) And a bit experimenting has shown that I like it that way.

    But Scott is a solid brand, so it should do OK.

    Likewise disc brakes. Unless I know for a fact that I'll only be using it as fair-weather bike, I'd go for discs instead. Fenders, rack and a solid lock will increase the everyday usefulness immensely.

    What you might try is to ask for disc-ready wheels, ie disc hubs laced to rim brake rims. It'd give you an easy upgrade path.

  3. #3
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    Yeah it looks very MTB in the pictures, but not so much up close. I guess the wheel size is deceiving.

    I thought about the sus fork long and hard. I figure the whole point is fitness so it doesn't matter if I waste a bit of energy if I can be more comfortable, save my joints and be more safe in general. And this one doesn't even travel that much...

    Disc breaks are actually an option for me (the 55 model), but they do add a 1/2 kg of weight and all those other disc break disadvantages and I'm pretty sure I won't be able to enjoy the benefits.

    So you're right, to each his own, except due to lack of experience I'll know for sure what's mine only after I shell out the cash. But I've made my peace with that...

    Thank you very much for going through all those considerations and reassuring me about the brand!

  4. #4
    ^ JBC. jbchybridrider's Avatar
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    G,day JonnyRo, You could do a lot worse than that Scott there quite good bikes and if you prefer suspension then go for it. There not real MTB forks though there only for absorbing small bumps on bad roads around town to smooth the ride.
    I've got a 2009 P1 and the biggest tyre you can comfortably fit is 35c because the chain stays are quite narrow, geometry is more to the MTB side but it is certainly an all round Hybrid with good high speed stability on road and it can take a 23mm tyre too.
    2010 Custom Carbon JBC, 1990 Ricardo Pinnacle, 1988 Ricardo Elite, 1983 Ricardo Varsity, 1990 Peugeot Hurricane, 1977 Dawes Galaxy GT, 2007 Pinarello F3-13, Custom aussie made 1980 Columbus SL racer, 1975 Calton Rapide, 1995 Olympia Fusari, 1993 Basso Viper.

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    That's it! Two people not saying I'm making a horrible mistake is all I need! I'm going to the store right now and I'll get back with first impressions.

    Thanks!

  6. #6
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    OMG! I know I'm not to be trusted because of my noobishness but this bike is just awesome! I paid 200€ for the previous one and double that for this one. But it seems to me the quality increased 10 times!

    If any wisdom can be extracted from my meager experience it's this: get yourself a bike! A cheap bike is better than no bike, as long as it's safe to ride. But if you hold out for just a bit more you can get a game changer! I guess it's all the competition in this 400-500€ range... I'm just angry with myself for not doing this sooner!

    If anyone has a question about this particular bike don't hesitate to ask. I'll try to find out and answer as best as I can.

    Thanks again for all your help!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by JonnyRo View Post
    Yeah it looks very MTB in the pictures, but not so much up close. I guess the wheel size is deceiving.
    Hadn't given the wheel size a thought. Was entirely thinking about the fork angle. There are plenty of 29er MTBs these days.

    Quote Originally Posted by JonnyRo View Post
    I thought about the sus fork long and hard. I figure the whole point is fitness so it doesn't matter if I waste a bit of energy...
    Thing is, as measuring devices us humans are real sucky at registering absolute values, but we're real good at noticing differences. Even comparing a short-travel fork to a rigid fork, the rigid will feel a lot more responsive. IMO, on marginally challenging terrain such a bike is just more fun to ride. It's more direct, you feel more connected.
    Whatever puts a smile on your face will make you ride harder and longer.
    But yeah, time needed for riding a set distance sus vs rigid might not mean much.

    Quote Originally Posted by JonnyRo View Post
    ....save my joints...
    If you were talking about riding singletrack, or maybe horse trails, I'd give you that w/o hesitation. But on paved roads they'd really have to be horribly bad for that to be a realistic consideration.

    Quote Originally Posted by JonnyRo View Post
    ...be more safe in general.
    Huh? How do you think a sus fork will make you safer?

    Quote Originally Posted by JonnyRo View Post
    Disc breaks are actually an option for me (the 55 model), but they do add a 1/2 kg of weight and all those other disc break disadvantages....
    And what would those be?
    Hydraulics can be a bit tricky if you're frequently popping the wheel in & out I suppose. And I guess every disc brake rider will bend a rotor eventually. Not much to lose any sleep over IMO, particulary considering what you're getting in return. Unlimited rim life, all-weather consistency etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by JonnyRo View Post
    ...I'm pretty sure I won't be able to enjoy the benefits...
    If the intention is to ride for fitness purposes, then regularity is a big thing. This means you'll need to get your exercise in when the schedule calls for it, not when the weather is nice. You see the conflict here? Either skimp on your purpose, or have an alternate training option available, or ride in all weather.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by dabac View Post
    Huh? How do you think a sus fork will make you safer?
    I figure the more time a wheel of a vehicle spends in contact with the surface the more safe the vehicle is. There's also an issue of longevity of critical parts and if you have something designed to absorb stress you can improve it. In the end there's common sense - "soft" is strongly correlated with "safe".

    I think disc brake disadvantages are common knowledge. And so are the advantages. I just envisioned myself mostly on the "con" side of the list...

    Yeah I exaggerated a little, sorry. Fitness is not the whole point.

  9. #9
    ^ JBC. jbchybridrider's Avatar
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    If you feel your roads are bad enough to want suspension and would like a smoother ride over a long road ride then that's OK.
    2010 Custom Carbon JBC, 1990 Ricardo Pinnacle, 1988 Ricardo Elite, 1983 Ricardo Varsity, 1990 Peugeot Hurricane, 1977 Dawes Galaxy GT, 2007 Pinarello F3-13, Custom aussie made 1980 Columbus SL racer, 1975 Calton Rapide, 1995 Olympia Fusari, 1993 Basso Viper.

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