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Old 05-04-13, 06:08 PM   #1
Mantaray14
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Needs suggestions for my trusty old MTB

Hello everyone,

I am the the original owner of this Gary Fisher Marlin, I purchased it in the late 90's (maybe 97-98), but before TREK was involved I think. Anyway it saw a decent amount of trail riding in my 20's. Then it was mostly a recreational bike for cruising the boardwalk (it still looked pretty nice with the original white tires). Years of living near the ocean rusted some parts, but she is still road worthy.

These days I'm just teaching my 6yr old son to ride. Mostly short suburban neighborhood rides and I want to bring him on light trails/parks maybe later this year. Of course I may go out my own now and again for some light trail riding. My bike needs some help though! The forward posture is annoying for the slower, leisurely rides you are forced to take with a small kid! I also hate the replacement tires I purchased from the local bike store. They were supposed to be Hybrid tires (slick in the middle), but I felt the original tires were much more comfortable in any situation.

I'm very handy but I just need ideas, because I don't have a lot of experience with different bikes parts, geometry and how to make it all come together. I'm thinking new neck, handlebars, seat, pedals, and tires. I could always do something with the fork later on (it's pretty shot but not annoyingly so). I know I could prob get some new cheap bike, but I hate heavy bikes and this frame fits me well.

Can anyone offer some suggestions to make this into hybrid that would fit my current needs?

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Old 05-04-13, 08:39 PM   #2
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Install this, takes 15 minutes. http://www.amazon.com/Kalloy-Adjusta.../dp/B001CK0CZA
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Old 05-04-13, 09:21 PM   #3
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welcome to the forum,,, you can also install a stem riser for about 20.00 bucks that'll give you about two inches of lift??but you may also have to lengthen brake cables using either one of these add on's,,, but still no major work doing that!!
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Old 05-04-13, 09:38 PM   #4
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Here ia a review on it : Well, to be honest, all I have to say is that this handlebar stem is very solid. It holds its position well too! The reason that I went with an adjustable stem was so that I could change my riding position depending on what kind of riding I'll be doing. Since I am a student, money is tight thus I only have one bike. Whether I'm riding a paved trail, dirt trail, gravel, asphalt--whatever--this stem stays put! Since my one bike often doubles (or triples) as a "road" bike, commuter, or light trail mtb, this stem performs extremely well. Of course it's not "everything to everyone," but for my needs, it is PERFECT
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Old 05-05-13, 05:19 AM   #5
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Google : ( threadless ) stem riser ...


If it needs more than that... CL it off ...

What usually happens is the knobbies are too slow, so thet *** swapped out fore some 1.5 street tires ... then the jumps bethween shifts are never right, they are either "too spin-y" or too "hard to pedal" , so road cass gats added... then there is no top-end, so a road crank is added ...
Sooo.... 200$ in parts and 50$ in labor, you have a decade old hybrid ... worth it only if you have a setimental attachment, or its something cool thats still made in the usa... otherwise, take save your 250 + whatever you sell that mtb for and put it towars a new bike.

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Old 05-05-13, 06:32 AM   #6
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I like the adjustable stem you posted, but I feel a slighter taller sem is also needed. Does anyone know what kind of stem would be on this bike? From what I've read they are either Threadless or Quill on a MTB.


Also any suggestions on some comfortable, versatile tires?
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Old 05-05-13, 06:51 AM   #7
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threadless ... in the pic posted.
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Old 05-05-13, 07:29 AM   #8
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Does anyone know where I can find a high rise sem like this? Also is there a stem riser on here as well? This looks like a good set-up for me right now (daddy cruiser). If I could reproduce this on my bike I would be happy for the time being and would be a nice "1st timer" project for me.

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Old 05-05-13, 08:00 AM   #9
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I like the adjustable stem you posted, but I feel a slighter taller sem is also needed. Does anyone know what kind of stem would be on this bike? From what I've read they are either Threadless or Quill on a MTB.


Also any suggestions on some comfortable, versatile tires?
That stem will raise your bars crazy high, plus brings them in closer, so you will be sitting upright. From your pictures the cables are long enough.
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Old 05-05-13, 08:24 AM   #10
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I vote no for an adjustable stem. Use one of the Satori Heads-Up risers,1-4, there are usually a bunch selling on eBay. If the bars are too far away just get a cheap replacement in the 70-90mm length, Titec or a used Thomson. I might change the bars, but ergo grips are very nice, comfy. Do the saddle last, see what riding position you settle on before you demo saddles. Get good tires, I'd pick something out of the Continential trekking or urban line.

Leave the fork alone. Even a worn shock does fine on pavement, if you go rigid you might not like the road chatter. If you want to carry loads and have eyelets on the rear drops put a Delta Sherpa on the back; fairly light, strong and cheap.
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Old 05-05-13, 09:03 AM   #11
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I vote no for an adjustable stem. Use one of the Satori Heads-Up risers,1-4, there are usually a bunch selling on eBay. If the bars are too far away just get a cheap replacement in the 70-90mm length, Titec or a used Thomson. I might change the bars, but ergo grips are very nice, comfy. Do the saddle last, see what riding position you settle on before you demo saddles. Get good tires, I'd pick something out of the Continential trekking or urban line.

Leave the fork alone. Even a worn shock does fine on pavement, if you go rigid you might not like the road chatter. If you want to carry loads and have eyelets on the rear drops put a Delta Sherpa on the back; fairly light, strong and cheap.
Thanks! FWIW right now I'm thinking Satori Stem Riser, Titec Stem, & On-one Mary Bar. Then I'll look at tires you you suggested, new pedals and eventually saddle. I think I have a good direction now.
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Old 05-05-13, 09:18 AM   #12
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Hello everyone,

I am the the original owner of this Gary Fisher Marlin, I purchased it in the late 90's (maybe 97-98), but before TREK was involved I think.
Unless it's very early 90's, think pre 1993, it's a Trek, what you have looks correct for late 90's.

Hybrid is a pretty broad term, and has different meanings for different people, for your bike, stick some slicks on it, dump the Indy for a rigid fork (Indys weren't that good BITD) and it should handle better, add a shorter stem to sort out the 'forward posture' and you should be good to go.

For the adjustable stem mentioned above, with your handelbar, this is a no go, the stem is 31.8mm, your handlebar if stock will be 25.4mm, you would need to make sure you got matching sizes if moving to a Mary
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Old 05-05-13, 10:51 AM   #13
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Unless it's very early 90's, think pre 1993, it's a Trek, what you have looks correct for late 90's.

Hybrid is a pretty broad term, and has different meanings for different people, for your bike, stick some slicks on it, dump the Indy for a rigid fork (Indys weren't that good BITD) and it should handle better, add a shorter stem to sort out the 'forward posture' and you should be good to go.

For the adjustable stem mentioned above, with your handelbar, this is a no go, the stem is 31.8mm, your handlebar if stock will be 25.4mm, you would need to make sure you got matching sizes if moving to a Mary
There are only 3 main stream sizes of handle bars, it will fit them all. You just need the inserts, example : My Allez had 25.4 mm bars..
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Old 05-05-13, 11:15 AM   #14
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Looking at the Amazon listing, not seeing it say anything about inserts being included, although you can get them from 3rd parties, like Wheels Manufacturing, for sizes, 25.4, 26, 31.8 & 35mm are all in use today, with many more obsolete ones.
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Old 05-05-13, 01:26 PM   #15
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Looking at the Amazon listing, not seeing it say anything about inserts being included, although you can get them from 3rd parties, like Wheels Manufacturing, for sizes, 25.4, 26, 31.8 & 35mm are all in use today, with many more obsolete ones.
Far as I know, all the LBS's around me have them in stock, that's were I bought mine. He doesn't like it anyway.. Its perfect for finding that sweet spot, then buy the correct stem, or if you like going from comfort to aggressive ridding style.. From what I've been told by a Trek dealer & Specialized that all new bikes are converting to the 31.8 size. For there Road Bikes, Hybrids, and MTB's... Just what I heard.
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