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  1. #101
    Senior Member goldfinch's Avatar
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    Belinibean, you say money is not an issue. I'd get a cadence sensor and see where you are really at with cadence before making other changes.
    Last edited by goldfinch; 05-12-13 at 05:42 PM.

  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by goldfinch View Post
    [bellinibean], you say money is not an issue. I'd get a cadence sensor and see where you are really at with cadence before making other changes.
    I second this. While I don't use one myself, I have a feeling that one could be of use to the OP. For what it's worth, I got my sense of cadence while riding indoors on my trainer (counting my pedal strokes and doing the math).

  3. #103
    Cabrőnista™ dprayvd's Avatar
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    I ride a 12-23/26-36-48 9spd flatbar. I ride amongst the upper watershed of a major river valley and have lots of moderate ascents, and many short&sharp ramps, especially west and north. I'm not givin'-up the triple and smallblock for nothing. NOTHING! lol

    I feel that after fit, tailored gearing is of decisive relevance.

    Bellinibean, I'm certain you'd be well served with a 13-23/25 cassette. DIY (bolt the unit onto the wheel, confirm the limits, and go) or have it done for you. And be amazed at the pleasure that is single-tooth ratios. On all three chainrings, too.

    Regarding the chain, I've used 116-link units out-of-the-box & can cross-chain to my heart's content (though I don't unless I'm really not paying attention then I'm like 'wut, no more gears?'), so no issue(s) on that score. I no not, however, bang this set-up on/over every harsh bump I see.

    If DIY's your method, you'll need a cassette tool, as well as a shortish length of chain & 14mm or 9/16 box-end as the soon-to-be-maligned hillbilly chain-whip, but you know this I'm sure.

    EBAY is lousy with such cassettes.

    The cassette tool I got at pricepoint was less than a tenner. And if your going to do drivetrain work you'll need the BB tool, and crank puller too.

    My lament about 8-speed is the 16cog is hard to find, and harder to ignore in its absence (unless you kick for a donor cassette--then you may do as you like, such as swap-in a 26/27/28...etc cog).

    I've settled into using two cassettes, two chains, and two middle rings per year, in a 2-month rotational manner (with attendant upkeep). The shifting starts being bland--and I mean lots of nudging and feathering the rear shifter--means new drive parts. Or chain-skip at the 16 through 21 cogs from tooth wear. I see myself having a 14-25 cassette sometime yet to come.

    I'll be 50 soon; I'll never of my own volition see the other-side of 200 pounds; I'm starting to have bony issues; jogging/lifting--the gym, ugh--has been out for some time now, and I'm not buoyant; all I wanna do is breathe and sweat. The bike makes allowances for all this, and right from one's front stoop .

    I don't run a computer anymore.


    OT: there's a great bit of dialogue in Brideshead Revisited between the Marquis and Charles regarding Bellini. Perhaps you are familiar with it?

  4. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomCat_Ford View Post
    I second this. While I don't use one myself, I have a feeling that one could be of use to the OP. For what it's worth, I got my sense of cadence while riding indoors on my trainer (counting my pedal strokes and doing the math).
    For yesterday's I purposely tried to keep my cadence higher than I'm used to. I found it was easier on my quads and easier to maintain speed. I watched the roadies ahead of me and tried to match their cadence as I rode (as silly as that sounds).

    On a side note, I got a harsh lesson in aerodynamics: was going on a moderate down hill for about 1/8 of a mile and while I was pedaling up to about 34mph, a roadie in front of me coasted the whole way and I never caught him..
    2013 Trek 7.2FX

  5. #105
    Senior Member xoxoxoxoLive's Avatar
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    Convert your Hybrid into a more friendly Road Bike

    Quote Originally Posted by Burton View Post
    Just for the record I have no idea who DorkDisk is but he IS at least one of the few posters here that seems to be showing a good understanding that chain length isn't a 'one size fits all' installation. You can choose to take or ignore that advise if you want to. Its all easily confirmable through Park Tool, Sheldon Brown, SRAM and Shimano website references. If you're actually interested in improving your cycling you need to learn what makes things work optimally rather than just putting things up for a vote on some forum with a bunch of strangers. Any and all of those references explain things very clearly and for some strange reason - are all in agreement with each other.

    Based on your last post of an average of 14.9mph over a 35 mile distance with stop signs etc ( congratulations on choosing to stop! ) Ihave the feeling you're in pretty reasonable shape. You might find a close ratio mtb triple up front gets you closer to where you want to go than the 48/38/28 hybrid crankset you currently have. Most are 44/32/22 but 42/32/22 cranksets are also available A higher cadance overall and the possibility of using all three front chain rings. Suggest you test drive a couple before making any more decisions. A 44T can be spun to 30mph with an 12T rear if your cardio is in good shape. That change will also be better for the chainline. You should look into shortening the chain if you go that way as well and sorry if I don't understand all the fuss about a 60 second operation. As already pointed out by DorkDisk, optimal cable length is determined by frame size, bar height and bar width and no one seems to have problems understanding that. Chains are no different and optimal shifting performance is only achieved by minimizing lengths in both cases - cable runs and chain lengths.
    bellinibean please talk to your local bike shop (LBS)

    Copy & Pasted from another Forum

    converting a mountain bike to a road bike


    The first thing is gearing. Unless you live where it's flat a 44 big ring will most likely be too small for road use, and your granny gear has no place at all. A road triple is generally 30/42/52, while a road double is 39/52 or 39/53. Your 22/32/44 or 24/34/46 rings will leave you wanting. Your cassette would be useable, but a road cassette will give you closer ratio which makes finding the "right" gear easier.

    There is plenty good information out there on this topic, (NONE) would tell you to install a MTB crank to make your Bike more road friendly. If money was not really a problem, then change your front to road crank compatible to your terrain, and the rear to a road cassette. Also those Bontrager 700 x 35c, could be changed to 700 x 28c road tire of your choice Then some bar ends could be added for more hand positions. Installing a cadence sensor first, would only confirm what you already know. That there seems to be missing gears when you switch, and it would let you know at what cadence you are truly spinning. The only real debate that should be going on here, is what road cassette you needed, like an 11-25 or 13-26 etc... Not shortening your chain, or what cadence your spinning. Knowing the cadence your spinning at, would only benefit if you were trying to maintain it. Which a road cassette would help smoothen out your shifts into smaller increments. Please take no offence, but I'm done posting on this thread. Again please talk to a LBS about your concerns, just for interesting discussions on this topic, Google (how to make a MTB more road friendly) because all your missing from having a MTB drive chain, is your front crank. And according to others on this thread, just install one to help make your bike more road friendly. Do you notice any sag in my chain, if shorting my chain would help it shift smoother. I would have been waiting outside the LBS this morning

    DSCN0939.jpg DSCN0942.jpg
    DSCN0943.jpg DSCN0945.jpg.
    2013 TREK 7.6 FX

  6. #106
    Senior Member xoxoxoxoLive's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Burton View Post
    Anytime you want to post an understandable translation of whatever that was supposed to be - feel free.
    My rear derailleur has the same tension on it, as it did when I was running the 11-36 cassette.. It's an inanimate object that can not read or reason.. when I'm on the small FRONT ring 34. and the back is on the 26T, (IT HAS THE SAME TENSION AS BEFORE) it does not know that was the last gear, & that the others are now gone. when you have that concept down, I will explain why running a short cage rear DR is not the greatest idea on a compact crank.. (not that it can not be done) just with a long cage you would not have to think twice.
    2013 TREK 7.6 FX

  7. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by xoxoxoxoLive View Post
    bellinibean please talk to your local bike shop (LBS)

    Copy & Pasted from another Forum

    converting a mountain bike to a road bike


    The first thing is gearing. Unless you live where it's flat a 44 big ring will most likely be too small for road use, and your granny gear has no place at all. A road triple is generally 30/42/52, while a road double is 39/52 or 39/53. Your 22/32/44 or 24/34/46 rings will leave you wanting. Your cassette would be useable, but a road cassette will give you closer ratio which makes finding the "right" gear easier.

    There is plenty good information out there on this topic, (NONE) would tell you to install a MTB crank to make your Bike more road friendly. If money was not really a problem, then change your front to road crank compatible to your terrain, and the rear to a road cassette. Also those Bontrager 700 x 35c, could be changed to 700 x 28c road tire of your choice Then some bar ends could be added for more hand positions. Installing a cadence sensor first, would only confirm what you already know. That there seems to be missing gears when you switch, and it would let you know at what cadence you are truly spinning. The only real debate that should be going on here, is what road cassette you needed, like an 11-25 or 13-26 etc... Not shortening your chain, or what cadence your spinning. Knowing the cadence your spinning at, would only benefit if you were trying to maintain it. Which a road cassette would help smoothen out your shifts into smaller increments. Please take no offence, but I'm done posting on this thread. Again please talk to a LBS about your concerns, just for interesting discussions on this topic, Google (how to make a MTB more road friendly) because all your missing from having a MTB drive chain, is your front crank. And according to others on this thread, just install one to help make your bike more road friendly. Do you notice any sag in my chain, if shorting my chain would help it shift smoother. I would have been waiting outside the LBS this morning

    DSCN0939.jpg DSCN0942.jpg
    DSCN0943.jpg DSCN0945.jpg.
    have you heard of grant peterson?

    i, along with many others happen to agree with him that a 24/36/46 crank is the most versatile and flexible crank. this used to be a mtn crank, now a touring crank

    again, place in big/big and check the der angle to check chain length. not any random gear combination

    OP, this is what i would do if that were my bike

    1) sugino 24/36/46 cranks
    2) slx 10sp shifters
    3) 105 10sp 11-28 cassette
    4) 10sp chain
    5) 105 short cage r der.
    6) slx front der
    5) mavic ksyrium wheels
    6) kevlar bead tires

    if i wanted to spend more, i would max out the wheels first. king/hugi with dt and open pros. least spoke count for my weight, straight front, straight / two cross rear. get a good builder. kovachi wheels in marrieta, ga are great

    after that i might go for xt/ultegra but no more than that

    the biggest change you will feel will be from the wheels. fast acceleration, and they maintain speed. also stock bikes come with heavy wire bead tires. a quick swap for foldable tires once the stock ones wear out will bring a noticeable change in ride quality.

    the gearing would allow for a very high 46/11 gear and a very usable 24/28 for the hills and tons of in between gears acheivable through double shifting. if you have no steep hills, ditch the 24 and trim it out

    also, i would like to add a correction. the cheapest thing you can do is to go rummaging through your lbs´spare parts bin and find a single cog. remove the 32 and place the cog you desire in the location you desire. if your cassette is riveted, you will hve to drill out the rivets.

    edit: it appears that john kovachi passed away two yrs ago. im bummed out. seattle should have some good wheel builders, though
    Last edited by DorkDisk; 05-12-13 at 03:33 PM.

  8. #108
    Senior Member xoxoxoxoLive's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bellinibean View Post
    For yesterday's I purposely tried to keep my cadence higher than I'm used to. I found it was easier on my quads and easier to maintain speed. I watched the roadies ahead of me and tried to match their cadence as I rode (as silly as that sounds).

    On a side note, I got a harsh lesson in aerodynamics: was going on a moderate down hill for about 1/8 of a mile and while I was pedaling up to about 34mph, a roadie in front of me coasted the whole way and I never caught him..
    With the FX 7.2 factory gearing, 48-12 being your fastest gear. you would have been spinning around 93 rpm's.. very realistic..
    2013 TREK 7.6 FX

  9. #109
    Senior Member xoxoxoxoLive's Avatar
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    2013 TREK 7.6 FX

  10. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by bellinibean View Post
    I watched the roadies ahead of me and tried to match their cadence as I rode (as silly as that sounds).
    That doesn't sound silly at all.

  11. #111
    Senior Member
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    anyone have experience with the cateye products? this one on sale doesn't look too bad.

    http://www.rei.com/product/760349/ca...-bike-computer
    2013 Trek 7.2FX

  12. #112
    Senior Member robble's Avatar
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    I have one of the $50 cat eyes from amazon. Works well. Heard bad things about wireless though.
    Trek 7.4FX

  13. #113
    Senior Member martinus's Avatar
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    I have the wireless one on my road bike and my ss commuter ... Not a single problem, with them the last Five years or so... I did buy the wired one first, but the first time I tried to wipe my bike down, it was so frustrating, I took the wired cadence and sold it on cl, and got what I should have bought the first time.

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    Bend the knees, watch the trees ... 5 $ please .

  14. #114
    Senior Member martinus's Avatar
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    ... I just rode torsv, in that time this thread def heated up.

    I really hope the op found the solution he was looking for, and he can enjoy his next ride...

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    Bend the knees, watch the trees ... 5 $ please .

  15. #115
    aka Phil Jungels Wanderer's Avatar
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    Yo won't go wrong with Cateye computers. And the price sure looks right at REI. Take the time to do a roll out with your tires, to get the circumference set correctly when you get it. It will only take 15 minutes to average three rolls, nonstop.

    "Retirement is the best job I ever had!" Me, 2009


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  16. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by martinus View Post
    ... I just rode torsv, in that time this thread def heated up.

    I really hope the op found the solution he was looking for, and he can enjoy his next ride...
    it's a work in progress martinus, I rode 35 miles Saturday and purposely stayed in the big ring up front (48) in order to see my options with the gear combos. I also stayed in a higher cadence than I'm used to as well. The results were about a 3mph increase in avg speed. Im a masher, so I hurt my quads pretty good, but it's alway acute pain and never lingers into the next day. I'm going to get a cadence sensor to help me.
    2013 Trek 7.2FX

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