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Old 01-02-14, 12:08 PM   #1
JediBiker
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Question Performance hybrid VS Flat bar road bike // Shimano Deore VS Claris

Hello bikers,
I'm looking for a new bike for longer and faster rides. I'm planning to use it for long distance commute (50 km) and touring (mainly road but I'm sure there will be plenty off-road miles) so it must be able to mount rack, etc.
I was thinking that a hybrid bicycle was the best choice but even inside the hybrid category there are so many choices.
That's why I need some help with my final decision as I round it up to just two bikes now.
One is a performance hybrid (2014 Giant Escape 0)
http://www.giant-bicycles.com/en-us/...0/14810/66190/
The other is flat bar road bike (2014 Scott Metrix 30)
http://www.scott-sports.com/us/en/pr...e-metrix-30-l/
The Metrix is $70 cheaper.
My main question is component wise. While the Metrix has road-oriented gearing the Escape has mountain bike-oriented parts.
Shimano Deore (mid-range MTB) or Claris (new low-range road) components, which one do you think is better? which will last longer? be more durable in the long run.
If you look at shimano hierarchy of components, Deore seems to be the better option but I've also heard that road component tend to be lighter and last longer than MTB parts.
There is also the issue of wheel width, 28c-30c-32c-35c-37c I want the narrower width that would allow me to go through some light trails off road.
Thanks in advance for any advice or info on the matter
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Old 01-02-14, 02:15 PM   #2
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It's personal preference on a lot of your options. I personally perfer a flat bar road bike--light, fast, responsive. For some trail duty, 700x28c is what I like. I do not like the Scott though, because it's only an 8 speed. Would much rather have a compact double crank and 9/10 speed. Are those two bikes chosen because they meet a certain price point? Can you expand your budget a little more? Makes a world of difference. I would prefer something optioned out more like a Trek 7.5 FX.

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Old 01-02-14, 02:18 PM   #3
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Hmmm, I'll be curious myself. I actually just started reading on the new Claris stuff. But I dunno. Only thing I *have* learned is that most bike shops have told me that outside of the very bottom rung (Tourney, I believe) that Altus on up is probably going to be sufficient enough for most folks for years to come. I know my Quick runs Altus FD and Alivio RD and I know that both shift nicely and have given me no problems to date. How long will they last? I dunno but if I get 5 years out of them and have to replace them, that's pretty cheap. I don't even think it's $50 for both derailleurs together so I ain't worried about it. If I didn't like the way they worked, I might consider something else, but they work just fine and lots of makers use similar setups. I rode a Fuji Absolute 1.4 w/ full-Deore RD & Acera FD & to be totally honest, I like the way my Q4 shifts better. (shrug)

Only other thing I'll be curious to see folks reply about is your tire quest. My research has left me w/ the belief that 32cm is about as close to the perfect tire as I can imagine. 28's felt a little small to me (and are mostly slick anyway, i.e. the Absolute 1.4) and 35's on up just felt a little too big & speed-robbing to me. 32cm is the perfect balance of speed & shock absorption, imho.

Just my $.02!
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Old 01-02-14, 02:24 PM   #4
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Hi, yes Trek 7.5 FX is a great bike but way off my budget besides the Trek store in my country only has 7.2 and 7.4 available .
What do you think of Deore vs Claris? Which one will last longer?
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Old 01-02-14, 03:58 PM   #5
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If you're into a performance Hybrid I would take a look at the Cannondale Quick series of hybrids over the Giant Escape Line. Imo, the Quicks are more nimble while the Escapes are for longer rides and noticeably more stretched out. I have both lines of bikes and enjoy each little bit of riding difference.
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Old 01-02-14, 05:01 PM   #6
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Certainly nothing wrong with Deore. It was designed with heavy duty/dirty in mind. Keep it clean and oiled, and it will last a very long time.
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Old 01-02-14, 05:17 PM   #7
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YMMV,but I'd avoid the Metrix if you're ever going to ride on trails. The alloy frame and straight blade alloy fork are not going to ride well except on perfectly smooth roads(I've test ridden a SUB,which is similar). The Giant has a carbon fork which will ride smoother and better components. As for Claris vs Deore;Claris isn't complete junk,but it is 8spd,which means chains and other drivetrain bits will last longer and be cheaper to replace than the Giant's 10spd.
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Old 01-02-14, 05:33 PM   #8
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I run 8 and 9 speed bikes, the latest bikes I set up with 8 speed triples.. I am 68 and do not have much horse power but the 8 works for me. The 8 speed chain life is superior and costs less than the 9 or 10, unless your terrain dictates more gears 8 should work fine.
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Old 01-03-14, 09:29 AM   #9
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Thanks everyone for your replies.

I know Shimano Claris is very NEW but there is somewhere on the forum or anyone who has already tested it. I want to now if the shifting is smooth, about the 8-9-10 speed dilemma, I used to ride a fixie now I have an old 7 speed so just 8 speed would be an improvement jeje

Finally about the perfect tire quest I also think 32c is the right choice but I would like to know if this specific wheel width would allow me to do some gravel roads??

Thanks again for your feedback, much appreciated.
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Old 01-03-14, 11:04 AM   #10
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Hello. IMHO, the best use of Claris is to find new spares for old 8sp bikes, especially the STI shifters.

Those two bikes have different geometries and gearing. My choice would not depend on easily replaced components but on those two factors.

I have never used Claris but Shimano´s entry level stuff functions great. If theres anything to worry about with Shimano, its not shifting smoothness.

Having said that, I like Hollowtech II cranks way better than anything Octalink.
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Old 01-03-14, 12:06 PM   #11
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Performance is not as bad as starbucks , at least they dont sue you for using a word,

anywhere sounding like it.


as to someone else testing it, In the North, ask again in the spring , when shops restock for the warmer season

as sales begin to pick up .. very Slow now .. although, the Australians* are enjoying Summer Now .

* + RSA, Chile Argentina, Brazil etc, etc, ..

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Old 01-03-14, 05:14 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JediBiker View Post
I know Shimano Claris is very NEW but there is somewhere on the forum or anyone who has already tested it. I want to now if the shifting is smooth, about the 8-9-10 speed dilemma, I used to ride a fixie now I have an old 7 speed so just 8 speed would be an improvement jeje
While Claris isn't going to be as slick as XTR or Dura Ace,it's not going to be junk. As long as it's set up correctly and maintained properly,it should work just fine. As for as the actual number of cogs in the rear,there's a big difference between just the number of gears. You can get an 11-34 cassette in 8,9,and 10spd;the difference will be in the jumps between gears and the durability of the parts. To get a ninth or tenth gear into the same space as an 8spd,the cogs and chain have to be slimmed down,which means there's less material and they'll wear out quicker(unless you're talking about the high end stuff,but that's a different conversation). I hated having 10spd on my old cross bike when I commuted on it because I was replacing chains after only about 8 months and they cost $40. On my 9spd touring bike,I was getting 12-13 months and they only cost $24.

If you're looking for all-out performance,10spd gives an advantage in weight and more gear options,but for regular commuters,it can just mean extra expense.

Quote:
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Finally about the perfect tire quest I also think 32c is the right choice but I would like to know if this specific wheel width would allow me to do some gravel roads??
First,the wheels are 700c,the tires are 32mm;just helping you with your terminology. How wide a tire you want really depends on the riding conditions and how smooth of a ride you want. I wouldn't do the gravel tow path on the C&O canal on anything skinnier than 38mm's,but then I have mild carpel tunnel. I wouldn't get super wrapped up in tire size until you've actually ridden the bike. If there's any gravel alleys or paths,or brick sidewalks/streets near the shop,you could test ride the bike on them to get a good idea of how it will ride.
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Old 01-05-14, 01:00 PM   #13
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Hello DorkDisk,

I know they have different geometries though I don't know the importance of it. I supposed it should depend on which one feels more comfortable for me to ride. I just know that the Scott Metrix has a road geometry (even if it doesn't look nothing like a road bike) and the Giant Escape has a more urban-commuter geometry. Another thing I notice about the geometry is that the Escape seems to be more stretched out the wheels are a little bit more separation between them I supposed this give more stability to the bike. Does anybody know the advantages o disadvantages of each geometry?

Another thing is important is the frame, while the Giant is double-butted the Scott is single-butted but hydroformed which makes it more lightweight. Which has the better frame? Where can I find more info about frame quality?

Thanks again for any info. Appreciated
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Old 01-05-14, 03:03 PM   #14
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Are you sure the giant is double butted? The Giant website says formed, single-butted. That would make both frames roughly equal, being formed and single butted.

My guess is that the Scott would be better on the road due to the shorter stays, wheelbase, and steeper angles. However, due to the gearing and the fork I would say the Giant is better on road than the Scott is off road, if that matters to you. This is by design, not by accident

Just ride them both and see which one you like better

Also, if you plan on using a rack with bags - maybe a frame with short chainstays would not be the best choice.
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Old 01-05-14, 05:00 PM   #15
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OP,

To my mind, this is -- as they say -- a no-brainer. For a price difference of only $70? The Giant. Disregard the terminological distinction: both bikes are 'hybrids' and/or 'flat bar road bikes'. Reasons:

1. You mention commuting and touring (with at least some luggage). The Giant is better suited to cover both for two reasons: the 'trekking' gearing on the Giant is classic 'touring' gearing; and the slightly longer chainstays are better suited to racks w/panniers (less risk of heel strike). The longer wheelbase will also make it more comfortable off-road, and will the carbon fork.

2. There will be no difference in 'speed'; that's down to you (the engine). The geometry is not all that dissimilar between the two; the chainstays on the Giant are only very slightly longer; and for all practical purposes the gearing is close enough (i.e. if you can spin a 48/11 gear you'll be going plenty fast on the flat. That's a tall gear.).

3. The Deore/LX mix on the Giant is better (durability) than the Claris mix on the Scott. The former is roughly equivalent to Shimano's Tiagra; Claris is two steps below that. Nothing wrong with it, but the Deore/LX mix is better, and better suited to your stated uses of the bike (see #1 above).

4. Geometry -- as implied above, the Giant's is better suited to touring. The Scott might be slightly more agile in a 'road bike' sense, but there will be very little in it.

5. Frame/fork quality: Giant makes their own frames/forks; and this model has a carbon fork as opposed to the Scott's straight-blade alloy fork. Scott is a 'design house' a la Specialized; their frames are made by whomever/wherever -- if you're lucky, by Giant! At this price-point I'd be happier with the Giant. By the way, Giant was the originator of hydroforming in aluminum frames afaik; both are likely hydroformed, both are 6061 alloy -- they will be very similar; both will likely be fine.

Summary: for the uses you state, the Giant. However, all of this is moot if you were to ride both and preferred the Scott (ride, look, intangibles). Buy a bike you'll actually ride; to do so, you need to want to ride it. No one on these forums can, ultimately, tell you which you'll prefer in the abstract.
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Old 01-06-14, 11:33 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DorkDisk View Post
Are you sure the giant is double butted? The Giant website says formed, single-butted. That would make both frames roughly equal, being formed and single butted.

My guess is that the Scott would be better on the road due to the shorter stays, wheelbase, and steeper angles. However, due to the gearing and the fork I would say the Giant is better on road than the Scott is off road, if that matters to you. This is by design, not by accident

Just ride them both and see which one you like better

Also, if you plan on using a rack with bags - maybe a frame with short chainstays would not be the best choice.
Hello,

Are you sure the Giant frame is not double-butted I though all Giant Aluxx Grade Aluminium Frames were double-butted, anyway the Giant frame must be better somehow, because it has a life time warranty while the Scott is only 5 years. If they are both hydroformed what's the main difference between single or double butted.

I notice that short chainstays is not the best choice for touring 'cause of the racks with bags, good advice. Thanks
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Old 01-06-14, 12:54 PM   #17
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I clicked on http://www.giant-bicycles.com/en-us/...logy/aluxx/56/

Butting refers to tubing with varying thicknessess throughout its length. There is more material on the ends (anyone remember moron tuning lol?) and the centers are thinner. Single, double, or triple refers to how many "steps" there are in the thickness. Triple butting renders the thinnest, hence lightest tubes.
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Old 01-06-14, 03:50 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JediBiker View Post
Are you sure the Giant frame is not double-butted I though all Giant Aluxx Grade Aluminium Frames were double-butted, anyway the Giant frame must be better somehow, because it has a life time warranty while the Scott is only 5 years. If they are both hydroformed what's the main difference between single or double butted.
I believe you're over thinking this. If you're looking for the absolute lightest bike,a serious MTB,or a loaded touring or cargo bike,then I'd worry about getting into the nitty-gritty of the frame's tubing. But for what you're looking to do,how the bike rides and how it fits you are far more important.

Also note: there's a reasonable chance that both frames were made by Giant.
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Old 01-11-14, 07:03 PM   #19
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Thanks badger1, sage advices. I was fix on the Giant, but sadly my local Giant retailer told me they are going to import the Escape 3 model instead of 0. This model comes with 7-speed and Shimano Tourney with seems rather unfitting for my use. I'm looking at the Scott Metrix or maybe the Scott Sub 40, what do you think of this bike? http://www.scott-sports.com/global/e...peed-40-men-l/
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