Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 26
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Central Florida
    My Bikes
    Giant Cypress DX
    Posts
    54
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    What does a high-dollar bike have going for it that mine doesn't?

    Recently got the first new bike I've had since I was a kid - a Giant Cypress DX. 24-speed, twist shifters. Got it on sale as last year's model for $440. So far I've been really happy with it. Includes 30, 60 & 90 day adjustments on the bike.

    The other bike I was looking at was a Cannondale - I believe one of the Adventure models. Other than the Cannondale being a little lighter, what seemed to be the biggest difference is the tool-free quick-adjust stem on the Cannondale. Intriguing but I couldn't see spending another $110 for a feature that it wasn't clear I'd really use that much.

    Within the hybrid realm what would be quantifiably better on a more expensive bike than my Giant?

  2. #2
    Still learning oddjob2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    North of Canada, Adirondacks, NNJ
    My Bikes
    Too many
    Posts
    4,958
    Mentioned
    22 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Your new bike represents good value. If you spent more on a hybrid, the most apparent changes would be components which are more durable, finely finished, and of better/lighter weight material.

    A couple of examples:
    Alloy chainwheels vs. stamped steel
    Alloy pedals vs nylon
    Trigger shifters vs. cheap twist grips which wear out quickly
    All metal rear derailleur with smoother action vs. nylon/metal
    Better/lighter weight grade of tire
    Anatomic saddle with durable covering vs cheap vinyl covered saddle
    Beefier alloy brake calipers
    Polished metal finishes vs anodized black
    Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving. Albert Einstein
    2014 Additions: 1985 Trek 560, 1992 Trek Multitrack 700 (my 2nd), 1994 Trek Carbon 2200, Peugeot PX-10, 1981 Schwinn Voyager, 1989 Bridgestone RB-1

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Southwestern Ontario
    Posts
    1,500
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    OP, you've already received the correct answer over on the board-formerly-known-as-the-41.

    Answer: if you are happy with and love what you have, no point in asking the question. Your bike is as good as any other bike. If you are asking the question, though, the answer is that "absolutely everything" is - or can be - quantifiably better. This applies no less to "hybrids" than it does to road, mountain, touring bikes.

    Now, off to make some popcorn and watch the fun.

  4. #4
    Senior Member spdracr39's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Cabot, Arkansas
    My Bikes
    2012 Trek Madone 5.2, 2012 Giant Composite XTC 29er 1, (2) 2014 Trek 7.1FX, 2014 Electra Townie 7D
    Posts
    410
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Buy a chevy or buy a cadillac. Both are gm products but one gets you there practically and one gets you there in style and comfort. More expensive gets you smoother lighter more reliable parts and bragging rights. Also a lot of times you get better paint choices when you spend more money.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Minnesota
    My Bikes
    '09 Trek 2.1, '75 Sekine, '90 Giant Mtb, Raleigh M20, Fuji Nevada mtb.
    Posts
    1,167
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    oddjob2 pretty much coverd it. We need to define what constitues low-common-high end bikes. Seems to me the componente differences between the low end and mid-range of $1300 (msrp) bikes can be significant, and less so moving from that to $2000 bikes. But that difference will be significant based on your riding style - very casual, fitness, or competition . Don't forget anal-retentiveness-if you are a perfectionist, well then a very high-end bike is the only one for you. Also, I've met up with a folks my age moving to carbon frames and the ride is so much more comfortable.

    After your riding style dictating the bike, then maintenance is needed no matter what to keep it functioning the way it's supposed to. Drive train components, bearings, spokes all have to be properly adjusted and kept that way. I've heard the story change from "this bike is complete crap," to "hey is really nice" just from fixing stuff that was never maintained. Sometimes you here of a set of wheels that cannot be kept straight no matter what and that's not always cost-based. Hardcore riders pushing their bikes require wheel sets costing more than I'm willing to pay for a bike.
    "Of course you eat too much" (Looigi) There are things people say that are so true you can never forget the wisdom. I still eat too much. Without denial.
    Awarded 2014 Billy Madison "Ultimate Insult" by jsharr. Must have been something about my rambling, incoherent response...

  6. #6
    Senior Member Bill Kapaun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Mid Willamette Valley, Orygun
    My Bikes
    86 RockHopper,2008 Specialized Globe. Both upgraded to 9 speeds.
    Posts
    6,765
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You get to pay a lot more for better components, less weight etc. That's worth it to some of us, when you consider how much some people spend on cars, dinners, hobbies, better tools etc.
    Most important though is the "smugness" factor.
    I built a far better set of wheels for my hybrid than stock.
    Nobody really notices, but I sure feel more smug. Almost as much as a Prius owner.

  7. #7
    Senior Member ps249's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Saginaw, Michigan
    My Bikes
    2014 Giant Escape RX Composite
    Posts
    103
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Frame material and shifting components make up a big chunk of the bike purchase

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Central Florida
    My Bikes
    Giant Cypress DX
    Posts
    54
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by RoadTire View Post
    've met up with a folks my age moving to carbon frames and the ride is so much more comfortable.
    Why would a carbon frame be more comfortable?

  9. #9
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    38,900
    Mentioned
    20 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Why would a carbon frame be more comfortable?
    different materials are afforded properties perceived by the subject .


    different materials are afforded properties perceived by the subject . + there are benefits to hand lay up of the materials..

    works with Fiberglass in boats too ...


    think about it a moment .. a plastic with bones in it .. carbon

    seen the new trek domane for the roadie set? put a rubber rather than a rigid connection
    at the top of the seat tube , so the whole seat tube flexes all the way ti the BB, for saddle vibrations to be less,,

    + not really add much weight .. it's offered in Aluminum too .
    Last edited by fietsbob; 04-21-14 at 08:24 AM.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Central Florida
    My Bikes
    Giant Cypress DX
    Posts
    54
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
    different materials are afforded properties perceived by the subject .


    think about it a moment .. seen the new trek domane for the roadie set?

    put a rubber rather than a rigid connection
    at the top of the seat tube , so the whole seat tube flexes all the way ti the BB, for saddle vibrations to be less,,
    Wasn't previously familiar with the bike but I took a look. My Giant Cypress DX has a "shock absorber" seat and adjustable front fork suspension, seems to give a really comfortable ride.

    Not clear why a carbon frame per se would make the ride any more comfortable.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    172
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Robert P View Post
    Wasn't previously familiar with the bike but I took a look. My Giant Cypress DX has a "shock absorber" seat and adjustable front fork suspension, seems to give a really comfortable ride.

    Not clear why a carbon frame per se would make the ride any more comfortable.
    I guess it would depend on your wants. If a soft cushy ride is what you want, you could spend money on a tire upgrade and find it worthwhile. Otherwise, no, more money does not give you a more cushy ride.

    Not everyone wants the same thing though and that's where more money does buy you better. Big difference between my $600 hybrid and my $2000 hybrid for what *I* want. For you, that $2000 bike may be a downgrade.
    Trek Valencia, 2010
    Marin Highway One, 2010

  12. #12
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Florida
    My Bikes
    2013 Giant Roam 2
    Posts
    23
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    When I was researching the bike I wanted, I had my short list down to a Giant Roam 2 or a Specialized Crosstrail Sports Disc. I went to my LBS, which luckily happens to be a dealer for both brands. The components were essentially equal but the prices were $200 apart. I hated the stock seats and tires on both, so customizing costs were going to be the same, no matter which one I purchased. I test rode both and couldn't tell the difference. I went with the Giant and paid $200 less. 6 months later, I still go into my LBS and test ride various bikes from time to time and I still can't find a better feeling ride for me than the Giant, no matter how much more expensive another bike is.

    To me, given the almost exponential rise in costs of bike components for smaller and smaller gains in performance/comfort just aren't worth it. I see people in my LBS buying $5k to $12k bikes all the time. If I'm paying over $1k for any vehicle, it better have an engine on it (other than me), keep me dry in the rain, and warm in the winter, because there is nothing you can put on a human powered bicycle that is worth that much to me. The component costs are so inflated it's just plain ridiculous. But, as long as fools are willing to be parted from their money, the manufacturers will continue to gladly take your money.
    "Squirrels are just rats with better PR." -- Anonymous

  13. #13
    Senior Member rebel1916's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    2,710
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Carbon frames can be engineered to flex in a way that provides a smoother more comfortable ride. On a hybrid with big tires and a suspension fork it is not gonna make a big difference.

  14. #14
    Ha ha ha ha ha giantcfr1's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Kyoto;JAPAN
    My Bikes
    2004 ORBEA Mitis2 Plus Carbon, 2007 Cannondale Bad Boy Si Disc, 2012 Trek Gary Fisher Collection Marlin 29er
    Posts
    4,233
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by themishmosh View Post
    I guess it would depend on your wants...
    Yup, I agree with this.
    I have the road bike I want , I have the hybrid I want , and I have the cheap and nasty hardtail 29er .
    BUT, I freekin lust after a cheap steel rigid 1 x 9/10, 29er .
    Road Bike: 2004 ORBEA Mitis2+Carbon, Freekin' groovy Urban / Mountain Road Cruising Bike: 2007 CANNONDALE Bad Boy Disc, MTB: 2012 Trek Gary Fisher Collection Marlin 29er

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Minnesota
    My Bikes
    '09 Trek 2.1, '75 Sekine, '90 Giant Mtb, Raleigh M20, Fuji Nevada mtb.
    Posts
    1,167
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Right - I cannot see spending $5k on a bike either, but have no judgement on someone who want's to. It's their money, and their ride. I opted for tires on my road bike (on sale) and wow what a nice ride. I can do a lot of tires to make up the difference between a $1200 road bike and a 5k road bike, if it's just the comfortable ride.
    "Of course you eat too much" (Looigi) There are things people say that are so true you can never forget the wisdom. I still eat too much. Without denial.
    Awarded 2014 Billy Madison "Ultimate Insult" by jsharr. Must have been something about my rambling, incoherent response...

  16. #16
    Ha ha ha ha ha giantcfr1's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Kyoto;JAPAN
    My Bikes
    2004 ORBEA Mitis2 Plus Carbon, 2007 Cannondale Bad Boy Si Disc, 2012 Trek Gary Fisher Collection Marlin 29er
    Posts
    4,233
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Robert P View Post
    ...

    Within the hybrid realm what would be quantifiably better on a more expensive bike than my Giant?
    Sorry I got tied up with all the responses and just noticed this was your actual question.
    What oddjob2 said is your answer.
    Road Bike: 2004 ORBEA Mitis2+Carbon, Freekin' groovy Urban / Mountain Road Cruising Bike: 2007 CANNONDALE Bad Boy Disc, MTB: 2012 Trek Gary Fisher Collection Marlin 29er

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    166
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Keith Bontrager summed it up best:

    "Strong. Light. Cheap. Pick two."

    Whether it matters to you is your own decision

  18. #18
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    38,900
    Mentioned
    20 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    though shifting production abroad, tries to make all 3 a bit more of a mix, with the family name owned by Trek these days ..

  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Central Coast, California
    My Bikes
    Kona Splice, Nashbar Carbon road bike
    Posts
    123
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The bottom line a $500-800 price range bike can still be a very nice ridable bike. I do a 30-50 mile ride every weekend on my $650 Kona Splice and average 15-18 mph, and sometimes pass guys on expensive road bikes.

    A more expensive bike will get you a lighter frame along with better components and a cooler look. If you like your bike and its comfortable for you to ride, enjoy it and keep it.

  20. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    166
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
    though shifting production abroad, tries to make all 3 a bit more of a mix, with the family name owned by Trek these days ..
    Well, he did say that before Trek sucked all the soul out of the brand.

    But yeah, it is a rather idealistic statement. There have been many, many expensive, light, and weak cycling products over the years

  21. #21
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    38,900
    Mentioned
    20 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Keith was a guy building bikes in a 2 car garage , then got bigger , then got an offer

    retirement pension deal no doubt .. . the Trek company absorbed Klein and Fisher too

    LeMond was an irritant ... after a while , so they dropped that deal..

  22. #22
    Gouge Away kaliayev's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    BFOH
    Posts
    975
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by rebel1916 View Post
    Carbon frames can be engineered to flex in a way that provides a smoother more comfortable ride.
    Carbon does not have a monopoly on this. The most comfortable bikes I've ever owned have been steel, plus no dead feel often found with carbon frames. Granted carbon can be made lighter, but I don't race so a bit more weight does not matter to me.
    2003 Stevenson Custom Cycles Sportive
    1978 Trek TX700
    1990 Trek 750
    All are frame/frame set builds.

  23. #23
    Senior Member Delmarva's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Posts
    306
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You got a lot of bike for $440.00 and it was a good deal if it does what you want it to. Which is to say if you enjoyed the last ride and look forward to the next ride then you really don't need to spend more money.

  24. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    My Bikes
    2012 Specialized Sirrus
    Posts
    1,075
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Delmarva View Post
    You got a lot of bike for $440.00 and it was a good deal if it does what you want it to. Which is to say if you enjoyed the last ride and look forward to the next ride then you really don't need to spend more money.
    +1
    I spent a lot of time wondering if I made the right choice, and whether I should upgrade etc. Then I discovered that the more I ride, the less I want to upgrade or change my bike - it is only when I am not riding lots that I start looking at bike shops. So the solution for me was quite simple - ride lots, ride frequently - and since I am back to commuting by bike, this is daily
    http://treadrightly.blogspot.com/

  25. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    southeastern PA - a mile west of Philadelphia
    Posts
    264
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Kapaun View Post
    ...Nobody really notices, but I sure feel more smug.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •