Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 69
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    13
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Help Choosing A Hybrid

    I need some advice on choosing a bike. I'm in my mid-twenties, 5'5" and a relatively fit female (exercise 1 hour/day, 6 days/week.) I eat healthy and enjoy an active lifestyle. I want to get into biking to replace my current cardiovascular routines. For the past three years, I've enjoy high intensity interval training (programs like Insanity for example.) I enjoy the challenge of getting into my anaerobic zone and the mental focus required to train so hard. I'm beginning to step away from these fitness practices due to the high impact on my joints (I have knee issues, so running has never been an option) and these programs are not sustainable practices. I've enjoyed recreational cycling but would like to make this a regular part of my fitness regimen.

    I think a (fitness) hybrid is the best choice, but it's difficult to define what type of cyclist I'd like to be since the sport is new to me. I figured a little background on the type of fitness I enjoy would help in any bike recommendations. I know I'll be riding on paved pathways and that I'd like the option to go long distances. I've been looking at the Specialized Sirrus Sport and the Trek 7.2 FX WSD.

    Feedback is much appreciated!
    Thank you!

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    253
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Not sure why, but most of the athletic women I see riding are almost exclusively on road bikes. The rest are sauntering along at 8mph on hybrids/comfort bikes. Certainly if flat bar is more your style, the performance-oriented bikes have a lot to offer: more gears, lighter weight, faster/more responsive ride, lighter/narrower tires, etc. Unfortunately it seems these bikes occupy the more expensive, higher end models of the hybrid spectrum.

    What's your budget?
    Trek Valencia, 2010
    Marin Highway One, 2010

  3. #3
    aka Phil Jungels Wanderer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    North Aurora, IL
    My Bikes
    Road & Hybrid
    Posts
    5,509
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Consider the Sirrus Sport Disc............ MHO

    "Retirement is the best job I ever had!" Me, 2009


    Specialized Crosstrail Sport - '08
    Nishiki Sport - misappropriated from my youngest son (circa 1984)
    Marin Stinson - misappropriated by my youngest grandson - '01
    "The Beast" - 1990 Schwinn Airdyne (in the basement for winter torture)

  4. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    13
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well, I'm not opposed to a road bike, but didn't want to be limited in terms of terrain. For example, coming across cobblestone, mud, sand, etc. I certainly won't be seeking this out, but I don't want to have to worry too much about handling this. Ideally, I would like to stick near the $800 range, however I'm willing to make the investment for the right bike that best suites my needs.

  5. #5
    Banned.
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    1,558
    Mentioned
    15 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Based upon what you've already described about yourself and your future bicycling aspirations, I'd say that you're most definitely NOT buying the proper bicycle for yourself.

    I would very strenuously advise you to start researching "Endurance" road bikes. Bikes like the Specialized Dolce, the Jamis Ventura Comp, the Jamis Quest Comp, the Trek Lexa S, and the Giant Avail.

    Right now there's the GT Corsa 1.0 being sold at REI for $800...It's a pretty good unisex deal...

    GOOGLE IMAGE..."interrupter brakes"...Place these on top of your road bike handlebars for more of a hybrid sitting position.

    You'll need varied hand positions for long distance cycling. That's what drop handlebars provide you...
    They also allow you to assume a more aerodynamic saddle position.
    Last edited by WestPablo; 06-08-14 at 02:42 PM.

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    13
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    This is extremely helpful WestPablo! I actually prefer the stance you get with road bike handlebars. I know this is a tough question due to each individual's preference, but is one brand preferable to another? Based on the bikes you recommended, how would I go about narrowing down the best value for the price? Again, I'm willing to invest for the right fit.

    Unrelated, I know someone selling their 2010 Giant Avail 3, but was really hesitant to consider used as I don't know enough to gauge it's condition. I was told it has under 200 miles on it, no components have been changed, it hasn't been dropped or scratched. It's being sold to get a triathlon bike. Anyways, going new is probably my best bet, right?

  7. #7
    Banned.
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    1,558
    Mentioned
    15 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Welcome to BF, Devingirl!

    You were right to give pause about purchasing a used road bike. However, sometimes that's the best way to go when you're just entering the sport. It allows you to spend the least amount of cash in order for you to become properly rooted into the exciting sport of cycling. OTOH, sometimes new cyclists hoping to cash in on the savings from the used market get duped by predacious scam artists trying to unload their dubious bicycles unto the unsuspecting cycling public.

    Therefore, buying used will definitely require the expertise of a mechanically acknowledgeable person. I would first have either a friend or relative who's bike savvy, eyeball this potential Avail 3 candidate for any obvious imperfections that your untrained eye might miss. Next, I'd schedule a day to take the bike for a practice spin.

    Prearrange one of the following two possible options:

    1) Schedule an appointment with a bicycle shop in which you have confidence. Go to the Avail 3 owner's residence and pick the bike up for the scheduled test ride. Immediately take the bike to the local bike shop for a mechanical evaluation. Be willing to pay about $50 for this service. Trust me, it will be more than worth the money in the long run...

    2) Make an agreement with your Avail 3 "associate" to meet with you at the local bicycle shop for a bicycle evaluation, if you like the test ride. Determine before hand the person obliged to pay for this inspection. If they tell you no bike shop evaluation no matter what, then you should pass. That's why option number one is better!

    Make Absolutely Certain that the Bike FITS!!!


    www.bicyclebluebook.com
    (You just might find this helpful)

    ...Looks like that 2010 Avail is worth about $344 in mint condition and $210 in Fair condition.

    (Mint + Fair)/2 = (344 +210)/2 = 554/2 = $277 = Good Condition

    I'd pay anywhere from $275 to $300 for a 2010 Avail 3 in Good Condition

    **************

    I've found that the best deals on bicycles are mostly found online. However, there are some continual deals that are found with bicycle companies like Giant, Jamis, and Fuji.

    The first preferred online resource should be Performance. I say that because with Performance, you order your bicycle online, but your actual bicycle arrives at one of their brick & mortar bike shops, where it gets assembled. It then sits there awaiting your arrival to pick it up. You then take it for a test ride. If you don't like the bike for whatever reason, they will give you a 100% refund.

    Checkout the endurance bikes at Performance: Find Bikes, Cycling Clothing, Bike Parts & Bike Shoes Or Your Local Bike Store at Performance.

    Of course, there's always Nashbar: Bikes, Cycling Clothing, Bike Parts & Cycling Gear: Bike Discounts & Deals from Nashbar

    Bikes Direct: Save Up To 60% Off Road Bikes, Bicycles, Mountain Bikes and Bicycles with Bikesdirect.com, New with full warranties

    and Jenson USA at www.jensonusa.com

    * Checkout REI-OUTLET and the GT Corsa 1.0 www.rei.com/outlet/c/bikes

    If this isn't enough, that's alright! Just come back to visit us and someone will be more than happy to assist you. Especially me!
    Last edited by WestPablo; 06-08-14 at 06:18 PM.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Carlyle
    My Bikes
    2014 Trek Domane 5.2 2013 Trek 7.3, 1973 Schwinn Continental, 1967 AMF Hercules
    Posts
    64
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    speaking as a mid aged male, who bought a trek fx7.3 late summer 2013, I can't wait to get away from the hybrid on go with a road bike. Last summer, I thought spending $700 on bike was excessive, however, it hasn't taken me long to realize that a road bike is the way to go

    With that said,before you buy a hybrid look at Cannondales, Treks and Giant road bikes.

    FTR: I going to buy a Cannondale Synapse 2 or a Trek do mane 5.2. These bikes sell north of $3K, but I realize that my trek 7.3 isn't where I want to be.

    Look at those road bikes before you buy a hybrid.

    all the best with your future purchase.

  9. #9
    Senior Member raqball's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    679
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    And here we go again... LOL

    Every time someone mentions buying a Hybrid they are given horrible information and attempts are made to steer them into a drop bar bike..

    OP, do not fear a Hybrid bike! I ride nothing but flat bar bikes and I am 100% comfortable on them. I easily do 40 miles a day and do a weekly ride of 60'ish. Every so often I even do a century on my lowly flat bar bike..

    If you like flat bars then go for it!

    The flat bar road bikes like the Specialized Sirrus or the Trek FX are awesome options..
    2013 Sirrus Limited SL4
    11-speed Ultegra 6870 Di2
    Magellan Cyclo 505 USA

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    3,826
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Devingirl View Post
    Well, I'm not opposed to a road bike, but didn't want to be limited in terms of terrain. For example, coming across cobblestone, mud, sand, etc. I certainly won't be seeking this out, but I don't want to have to worry too much about handling this. Ideally, I would like to stick near the $800 range, however I'm willing to make the investment for the right bike that best suites my needs.
    A country bike is always the ticket. You said you have to go fast? As you quickly can get up to cruising speed, you can enjoy your surroundings whether on a fire road or in town. And even when we are fit, let's face it, we're not training to win the Tour De France. A Novara Divano is close to your budget and it has a relaxed frame geometry, an upright position, can accept fenders and fatter tires, has a triple crankset for the hils, has disk brakes and you can go to the grocery store or hit the trails. The Marin Muirwoods 29er does much the same thing and allows you to fit monster tires for a really floaty ride. So you don't have to be limited in terms of tire choices or where you want to ride with your bike. That's your decision.

  11. #11
    Banned.
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    1,558
    Mentioned
    15 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by raqball View Post
    And here we go again... LOL

    Every time someone mentions buying a Hybrid they are given horrible information and attempts are made to steer them into a drop bar bike..

    OP, do not fear a Hybrid bike! I ride nothing but flat bar bikes and I am 100% comfortable on them. I easily do 40 miles a day and do a weekly ride of 60'ish. Every so often I even do a century on my lowly flat bar bike..

    If you like flat bars then go for it!

    The flat bar road bikes like the Specialized Sirrus or the Trek FX are awesome options..
    The reason that you keep entering this revolving door, time after time, is because you keep offering a less efficient tool for the job every single time.

    Why use a pair of pliers to turn a hex nut when you can use a box wrench, or a ratchet and socket?

    The OP says she wants to do long distance cycling. That automatically implies more variable hand positions. Otherwise, her hands will suffer either numbness, pain, or both. Besides, if the OP should purchase a flatbar road bike or a performance hybrid, but decides later that she'll want a more capable road bike, she'll be forced to make another bicycle purchase. It would be more financially advantageous to purchase a drop bar road bike from the outset, because with the addition of interrupter brakes, the road bike can be ridden just like a hybrid. It's much easier for a road bike to mimic a hybrid, than for a hybrid to mimic a road bike. A hybrid could never attain the aerodynamics of a genuine drop bar road bike.

    Sure, a flat bar road bike (performance hybrid) can approach the speed of a drop bar road bike on windless days, but the speed of the bike itself creates air resistance the faster it goes as it pushes against air molecules within our atmosphere. That's wind or no wind! Therefore, the aerodynamics of the drop bar road bike will always be superior. If you're not concerned with speed, but only the amount of distance traversed, then your only concern would be available options for hand positions. Of course, you could always add bar ends or trekking bars, but drop bars offer the most varied hand positions.

    At the end of the day, drop bar road bikes rule!

    ....And that's from a genuine hybrid lover!
    Last edited by WestPablo; 06-08-14 at 08:30 PM.

  12. #12
    Senior Member raqball's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    679
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by WestPablo View Post

    At the end of the day, drop bar road bikes rule!


    "The OP says she wants to do long distance cycling. That automatically implies more variable hand positions. Otherwise, her hands will suffer either numbness, pain, or both."

    This is nothing more than an assumption / putting out bogus information on your part as I do distances just fine with my flat bar.. I suffer no pain and no numbness. A properly fitted flat bar bike with bar ends is just a suitable for doing distance as a drop bar bike is..

    "Besides, if the OP should purchase a flatbar road bike or a performance hybrid, but decides later that she'll want a more capable road bike, she'll be forced to make another bicycle purchase"


    Or the OP could end up taking what could be very bad advise and buy a drop bar only to realize that she wanted a flat bar bike.. It goes both ways.. Drop bar bikes are not the end all for everyone!

    I did get a kick out of this comment though --> she'll want a more capable road bike

    More capable than what? I'd argue that my flat bar bike is more capable than most of the drop bar bikes on the road..
    Last edited by raqball; 06-08-14 at 08:27 PM.
    2013 Sirrus Limited SL4
    11-speed Ultegra 6870 Di2
    Magellan Cyclo 505 USA

  13. #13
    Banned.
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    1,558
    Mentioned
    15 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by raqball View Post


    "The OP says she wants to do long distance cycling. That automatically implies more variable hand positions. Otherwise, her hands will suffer either numbness, pain, or both."

    This is nothing more than an assumption / putting out bogus information on your part as I do distances just fine with my flat bar.. I suffer no pain and no numbness. A properly fitted flat bar bike with bar ends is just a suitable for doing distance as a drop bar bike is..

    "Besides, if the OP should purchase a flatbar road bike or a performance hybrid, but decides later that she'll want a more capable road bike, she'll be forced to make another bicycle purchase"


    Or the OP could end up taking what could be very bad advise and buy a drop bar only to realize that she wanted a flat bar bike.. It goes both ways.. Drop bar bikes are not the end all for everyone!

    I did get a kick out of this comment though --> she'll want a more capable road bike

    More capable than what? I'd argue that my flat bar bike is more capable than most of the drop bar bikes on the road..
    Have you ever seen a flat bar road bike in the Tour de France?

    ...And you never will, because it just can't accommodate a cyclist's need to assume a more aerodynamic position. Air resistance is a major handicap when racing!

    Since when is taking the sage advice of buying a more capable road bike, ever very bad advice?

    Usually, the only people wanting to switch to flat bar road bikes from drop bar road bikes, are those with back problems. Most times, they're either middle-aged or older, and they suffer from the lack of flexibility. The OP is in her twenties. I'm most certain that she won't be visited with any kind of flexibility afflictions.
    Most newbies, just entering the sport, generally end up preferring a drop bar road bike, after the initial purchase of a hybrid. If they're anything like me, they'll like 'em both!

    Finally, there is absolutely no way that a flat bar road bike can be just as suitable for long distance cycling as a genuine drop bar road bike for both the aerodynamic and hand position reasons I've previously given....Just No Way! The aerodynamics alone displaces the hybrid totally out of contention.

    Why do we only find drop handlebars (or track bars) on racing road bikes?

    Answer this question correctly and you can enter my universe!


    Gosh! This is fun!
    Last edited by WestPablo; 06-09-14 at 04:14 AM.

  14. #14
    Senior Member raqball's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    679
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by WestPablo View Post
    Gosh! This is fun!
    Why would you feed the OP bogus information then make light of it with a statement like that?

    WOW!

    I am not really interested in arguing with you as it's now very apparent that you are playing some type of childish game in someones thread who simply wants advise..

    Trying to force your belief down their throat is not advise..

    OP.. Test out different bikes if you can. Try flat bar and drop bar. Whichever is more comfortable to you (not some stranger on the internet who is trying to force their beliefs down your throat) buy it..

    Which ever you choose, enjoy it!
    2013 Sirrus Limited SL4
    11-speed Ultegra 6870 Di2
    Magellan Cyclo 505 USA

  15. #15
    Banned.
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    1,558
    Mentioned
    15 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by raqball View Post
    Why would you feed the OP bogus information then make light of it with a statement like that?

    WOW!

    I am not really interested in arguing with you as it's now very apparent that you are playing some type of childish game in someones thread who simply wants advise..

    Trying to force your belief down their throat is not advise..

    OP.. Test out different bikes if you can. Try flat bar and drop bar. Whichever is more comfortable to you (not some stranger on the internet who is trying to force their beliefs down your throat) buy it..

    Which ever you choose, enjoy it!
    No. You've misinterpreted that statement. IMHO, we're debating the features that we think will best serve the cycling needs of the OP. To me, that's fun!

    It's fun because, I know how you're thinking about the hybrid and I do believe that you're right up to a point. However, once the OP states that she's interested in long distance cycling, the hybrid drops out of the picture, because it's clearly not the best tool for the job, IMO.

    To me, it's fun to debate this point. It's also funny to me that you fail to see my point as I do. I guess that's what debates are all about! So yeah, this IS fun!

  16. #16
    Senior Member raqball's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    679
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm all but done responding to you..

    You keep making statements about drop bars and I can not find anywhere in the OP's post where she says

    1) She want to compete in the Tour de France (you referenced that out of nowhere)
    2) The OP never says she want to go real fast (you referenced that again, out of nowhere)
    3) The OP never said she wanted to be in an aerodynamic position (again another out of nowhere reference)

    What the OP asked was for a comparison of Hybrid bikes. She never asked about drop bar bikes..

    She was very clear what she want her bike for.. In my opinion she is educated, already has some knowledge of cycling, and has an idea ofof what she wants..

    Maybe a Hybrid or flat bar is not for her BUT only she can answer that after having taken some test rides..

    Yes a flat bar road bike can indeed do distance. Yes a flat bar bike can indeed be comfortable and yes indeed a flat bar bike is a better option for many.
    2013 Sirrus Limited SL4
    11-speed Ultegra 6870 Di2
    Magellan Cyclo 505 USA

  17. #17
    Banned.
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    1,558
    Mentioned
    15 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by raqball View Post
    I'm all but done responding to you..

    You keep making statements about drop bars and I can not find anywhere in the OP's post where she says:

    1) She wants to compete in the Tour de France (you referenced that out of nowhere)
    2) The OP never says she want to go real fast (you referenced that again, out of nowhere)
    3) The OP never said she wanted to be in an aerodynamic position (again another out of nowhere reference)

    What the OP asked was for a comparison of Hybrid bikes. She never asked about drop bar bikes..

    She was very clear what she want her bike for.. In my opinion she is educated, already has some knowledge of cycling, and has an idea ofof what she wants..

    Maybe a Hybrid or flat bar is not for her BUT only she can answer that after having taken some test rides..

    Yes a flat bar road bike can indeed do distance. Yes a flat bar bike can indeed be comfortable and yes indeed a flat bar bike is a better option for many.
    The OP admits that she actually prefers the saddle position that the drop bar offers in a road bike. Review the thread...

    Responses:

    1) I was merely pointing out the fact that flat bars are inherently slower than drop bar bicycles, due to the lack of aerodynamics. That statement came about as a result of your questioning my statement about drop bar road bikes being "more capable". A faster bike is a "more capable" bike!

    2) The reason is given above in response number one...

    3) Again, the point was being made that the drop bar road bike was more capable than the flat bar road bike. You questioned that statement. I responded by bringing up the point about the benefit of aerodynamics that a drop bar road bike affords you, whereas the flat bar road bike lacks any aerodynamic advantage. This makes the drop bar road bike a more capable bike.

    The OP was most assuredly NOT asking for hybrid bike comparisons! Where does she ever ask for hybrid bicycle comparisons?

    The OP is clearly making a plea for guidance from people she already knows have a greater depth of knowledge and experience about cycling than she does. That's why she came to BF in the first place. Telling her or encouraging her to go with hybrids, when she states that she's interested in long distance cycling seems counter-productive. It would be different if she expressed an interest in doing a century possibly one time, just to experience what cycling a century is all about, but the OP clearly states, that she'd "like the option to go long distances"... To me, this implies a possible routine cycling activity. Definitely not something you'd like to do frequently with a flat bar road bike, when they're plenty of drop bar options available.
    Last edited by WestPablo; 06-09-14 at 02:38 AM.

  18. #18
    Senior Member raqball's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    679
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by WestPablo View Post
    The OP is clearly making a plea for guidance from people she already knows have a greater depth of knowledge and experience about cycling than she does. That's why she came to BF in the first place. Telling her or encouraging her to go with hybrids, when she states that she's interested in long distance cycling seems counter-productive. It would be different if she expressed an interest in doing a century possibly one time, just to experience what cycling a century is all about, but the OP clearly states, that she'd "like the option to go long distances"... To me, this implies a possible routine cycling activity. Definitely not something you'd like to do frequently with a flat bar road bike, when they're plenty of drop bar options available.
    I've not done like you have and try to force a flat bar down her throat like you have with trying to force a drop bar on her.. I said a flat bar is an option and I provided information on how I ride to show that what you are saying is false!

    You can keep playing this game all you want.. I am blocking you as in my opinion you give out very bad advise and want others to conform into your line of thinking.. At any cost...

    I do distance all the time! I am retired and I cycle every day! My shortest route is 30 miles but I rarely do it. Normally my daily rides are 40-45 miles.. Once a week I do a 60 mile route and every so often (not just once to see how it is) I do a century.. All on my flat bar and all with no issues.. I don't get how hard this is for you to understand...

    The OP also never defined long distance.. To some 20 miles is long distance.. You assumed she means doing a century a day and have based your responses on this assumption..

    Anywho.. Enjoy quoting me again because I won't see it.. I really have no interest in reading your opinion any longer..
    Last edited by raqball; 06-08-14 at 09:59 PM.
    2013 Sirrus Limited SL4
    11-speed Ultegra 6870 Di2
    Magellan Cyclo 505 USA

  19. #19
    Senior Member MRT2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Wisconsin
    My Bikes
    2012 Salsa Casseroll, 1997 Bianchi Advantage, 1994 Trek 930.
    Posts
    2,096
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I agree with WestPablo on this, though I don't really want to argue with Raqball, either. Here is my take.

    most young fit females I see on bikes ride road bikes, while a few ride single speeds, and the rest riding old beaters, cruisers, etc...

    Second, among those who are in road riding clubs, 95% or more ride some kind of drop bar bike, with a small minority riding flat bar road bikes, single speeds, or converted mountain bikes.

    So you have a whole culture among road riding enthusiasts that favor drop bars over flat bars. Now, it could be that Raqball and others are right and all these road riders are wrong, but the more likely explanation is, most people who start out with $500 or $600 hybrids quickly realize the hybrid is limiting them to some extent and they aren't doing as much trail riding as they thought and if they are, they should be looking more for a mountain bike or 29er, not a flat bar hybrid. Do experienced riders move equally from drop bars to flat bars? Perhaps, but not usually in the young fit cohort.

    finally, if you go with an endurance type road bike, cyclocross bike, or touring adventure bike, you should be able to set it up to handle some rough pavement or even gravel roads. Just stay away from the really skinny 23 mm tires and go with 25 or even 28 mm tires. They will still be plenty fast, but will be able to handle light trails, which is all a performance hybrid can do anyhow.
    Last edited by MRT2; 06-08-14 at 10:19 PM.

  20. #20
    Senior Member 2702's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    USA
    My Bikes
    14 Specialized Sirrus Expert Disc
    Posts
    289
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Where does the OP live? If for example OP lives in a crowded urban area where you are riding from sidewalk to major street to side street a hybrid is much more practical.
    That's me, I live in a big city and do all of the above and hated quite often doing that on a road bike where my body is stretched out for no reason cause I really can't go any faster than a hybrid based on the roads ahead of me.

    Just took my first long ride on my Sirrus and LOVE it. High sitting position, bar ends for relaxed riding and hills, can see better, feels more natural, no more showing my underwear when I was leaned over on the road bike makes me feel good too.

    And please don't shoot me cause I'm .9 mph slower on my hybrid.
    Last edited by 2702; 06-08-14 at 10:23 PM.

  21. #21
    Senior Member raqball's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    679
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by 2702 View Post
    Where does the OP live? If for example OP lives in a crowded urban area where you are riding from sidewalk to major street to side street a hybrid is much more practical.
    That's me, I live in a big city and do all of the above and hated quite often doing that on a road bike where my body is stretched out for no reason cause I really can't go any faster than a hybrid based on the roads ahead of me.

    Just took my first long ride on my Sirrus and LOVE it. High sitting position, bar ends for relaxed riding and hills, can see better, feels more natural, no more showing my underwear when I was leaned over on the road bike makes me feel good too.

    And please don't shoot me cause I'm .9 mph slower on my hybrid.
    A large chunk of my daily rides are in the city.. All my start and end points are from my home.. For all my rides it takes me 9 miles to get to the bike path.. Then about 4 miles on the path before I break off onto whatever route I am doing for that day.. So that's 9 miles in city and then 4 miles on the path = 13 miles each way or 26 of my total is always in city traffic or dealing with the bike path walkers..

    Good points made though!
    2013 Sirrus Limited SL4
    11-speed Ultegra 6870 Di2
    Magellan Cyclo 505 USA

  22. #22
    Senior Member MRT2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Wisconsin
    My Bikes
    2012 Salsa Casseroll, 1997 Bianchi Advantage, 1994 Trek 930.
    Posts
    2,096
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I can relate my own experience having started 17 years ago on a hybrid, realizing its limitations, then moving to an old touring bike and finally to my current ride, which is a drop bar bike, though certainly not especially light sleek or fast by modern standards. But if I were younger and skinnier, for sure I would go for something lighter and more aggressive.

    so, 17 years ago, when I was still in my early 30s, bought a Bianchi hybrid to ride a charity ride with my fiancée. At the time, I had no idea biking would become an on again off again obsession for me, so I just went with the cheapest decent option I could find. The Bianchi was and is a fine bike. And it took me through the charity ride and many rides since. Family rides, used by my niece as a commuter, solo rides, club rides, and currently used by my son for family rides and the occasional organized ride. But when I tried to use it for club rides, it had its limitations. 20 to 30 Miles was certainly doable, but much past that and the upright riding position was somewhat limiting because of the lack of hand positions, upright riding position, and scrunched up feeling in the cockpit, and gearing better suited for mountain biking than road biking. on group rides, the gearing was too low to keep up with the roadies on descents and to a lesser extent, flats. Super low gears for climbing, though.

    Though I don't exactly regret the years riding my hybrid, if I knew then what I know now, I should have bit the bullet and gone with a road bike back in the 90s.

  23. #23
    Senior Member raqball's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    679
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
    more likely explanation is, most people who start out with $500 or $600 hybrids quickly realize the hybrid is limiting them to some extent and they aren't doing as much trail riding as they thought and if they are, they should be looking more for a mountain bike or 29er, not a flat bar hybrid..
    In all fairness though, the bikes the OP listed are more flat bar road bike'ish than Hybrid.. To me there is a big difference between what I'd call a Hybrid and what I'd call a flat bar road bike..

    Quote Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
    But when I tried to use it for club rides, it had its limitations. 20 to 30 Miles was certainly doable, but much past that and the upright riding position was somewhat limiting because of the lack of hand positions, upright riding position, and scrunched up feeling in the cockpit, and gearing better suited for mountain biking than road biking. on group rides, the gearing was too low to keep up with the roadies on descents and to a lesser extent, flats. Super low gears for climbing, though.
    Everyone is different.. I feel like I am beating a dead horse here.. I do distance just fine and I have no issues.. Also, my flat bar road bike has the exact same gearing as a drop bar road bike.. As a matter of fact most of the high end flat bar road bikes have the same frame, gearing = everything that a drop bar road bike has and the ONLY difference is one has a drop bar and one has a flat bar..
    Last edited by raqball; 06-08-14 at 10:49 PM.
    2013 Sirrus Limited SL4
    11-speed Ultegra 6870 Di2
    Magellan Cyclo 505 USA

  24. #24
    Senior Member MRT2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Wisconsin
    My Bikes
    2012 Salsa Casseroll, 1997 Bianchi Advantage, 1994 Trek 930.
    Posts
    2,096
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by raqball View Post
    In all fairness though, the bikes the OP listed are more flat bar road bike'ish than Hybrid.. To me there is a big difference between what I'd call a Hybrid and what I'd call a flat bar road bike..



    Everyone is different.. I feel like I am beating a dead horse here.. I do distance just fine and I have no issues.. Also, my flat bar road bike has the exact same gearing as a drop bar road bike.. As a matter of fact most of the high end flat bar road bikes have the same frame, gearing = everything that a drop bar road bike has and the ONLY difference is one has a drop bar and one has a flat bar..
    Fair enough. 2 years ago, I considered some of the newer performance hybrids. Cannondale Quick, Jamis Coda, Trek fx, etc...test rode a few. Yes, these bikes are lighter and more road oriented than my old hybrid. But I was ready to make the jump to.a drop bar road bike. Of course, since I have a hybrid and a mountain bike, I really don't need my road bike to handle trail riding I considered getting interrupter brake levers, but I quickly adapted to braking from the hoods, so never bought them.

    i find riding on the hoods and ramps far more comfortable on the hands and wrists than riding flat bars. And while the first few weeks on the Salsa was an adjustment, I have come to prefer the stretched out feeling riding the 55 cm Salsa over riding the much smaller 18"Bianchi.
    Last edited by MRT2; 06-08-14 at 11:06 PM.

  25. #25
    Senior Member daihard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    My Bikes
    Trek, Cannondale
    Posts
    1,533
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by raqball View Post
    Everyone is different.. I feel like I am beating a dead horse here.. I do distance just fine and I have no issues.. Also, my flat bar road bike has the exact same gearing as a drop bar road bike.. As a matter of fact most of the high end flat bar road bikes have the same frame, gearing = everything that a drop bar road bike has and the ONLY difference is one has a drop bar and one has a flat bar..
    Yeah, some of the high-end hybrid (or "fitness") bikes share the frame with the drop-bar road bikes (i.e. Trek 7.7 FX with Madone 3). Gearing on many performance hybrids are similar to that of road bikes - a compact double up front and 9-10 speed rear.

    I do agree that the lack of available hand positions can be a limiting factor on flat-bar bikes, though that's not unsolvable (i.e. bar-ends). I know people have done STP (200+ miles) on flat-bar bikes, so it must at least work for someone.
    Badly-behaved cyclists are usually just cyclists with inadequate infrastructure. Or none at all. - Mikael Colville-Andersen

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •