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Old 06-11-14, 03:18 PM   #1
babubhai
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2014 Cannondale Quick CX 2 vs CX 3 Reviews

Hello everyone,

I am new to this forum and getting back to cycling after so long. I live in Dallas/Ft Worth metroplex (anyone from here?); I was looking at a Dual Sport or Hybrid bicycle that met my needs. I am mostly looking to ride around my neighborhood or the bike trails near my house. I also want some mountain bike capability, that's why I chose to go with a Dual Sport/Hybrid bicycle.

I am looking at Cannondale Quick CX 2 and Quick CX 3; I like the CX 2, but CX 3 also has decent specs and is cheaper in price. I wanted to know if anyone has any feedback with these models, especially if they have 2014 model.

Thanks,

BB
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Old 06-11-14, 03:36 PM   #2
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My gut reaction off the cuff...I wouldn't bother with a front suspension that was fairly low end and only had 50mm of travel. I'd ditch the suspension and go with something that didn't have one. Cannondale makes good bikes, I just don't like the fork on those. Others may opine differently.

What about something like this? Bang for the buck seems high to me. Steel, comfy, seems to do what you want, value for the dollar factor high.

http://www.rei.com/product/837487/novara-buzz-bike-2014


Or this. Alu frame but steel fork, hyd brakes.

http://www.rei.com/product/866492/ra...-2014#specsTab


I'm not a huge fan of straight alu forks, but I like them better than low end suspension forks. They make a Quick CX without suspension, I think, like the CX4 if I'm not mistaken. Also the Bad Boys.

Last edited by syncro87; 06-11-14 at 03:44 PM.
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Old 06-11-14, 06:06 PM   #3
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My gut reaction off the cuff...I wouldn't bother with a front suspension that was fairly low end and only had 50mm of travel. I'd ditch the suspension and go with something that didn't have one. Cannondale makes good bikes, I just don't like the fork on those. Others may opine differently.

What about something like this? Bang for the buck seems high to me. Steel, comfy, seems to do what you want, value for the dollar factor high.

Novara Buzz Bike - 2014 at REI.com


Or this. Alu frame but steel fork, hyd brakes.

Raleigh Misceo 3.0 Bike - 2014 at REI.com


I'm not a huge fan of straight alu forks, but I like them better than low end suspension forks. They make a Quick CX without suspension, I think, like the CX4 if I'm not mistaken. Also the Bad Boys.
Thank you for your response syncro87. Say if I choose a Cannondale without fork, will that forbid me to go off road riding? Also, is more than 50mm recommended on suspension forks? What about if that fork has lockout feature? Will that help in anyway?
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Old 06-11-14, 06:17 PM   #4
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The lockout is for on road riding. It keeps the suspension from moving when you are on a hard surface like pavement. If you didn't have a lockout, the suspension would move when you pedaled and that would suck away efficiency.

Others may correct me here, but a decent suspension fork, if I'm not off base, would have 100mm of travel. As important as the travel, would be the damping ability and rebound damping. Also, you have stanchion (the tube) thickness. A thicker stanchion is stiffer and better.

So, as a general rule, you'd want the thickest stanchions you could get and the longest travel. You'd also probably want air damping or something. I'm not a fork expert by any means. I tried to learn about them when I was shopping for a MTB a year ago. So you'd want to ask someone more versed than myself.

I think if you had a low end suspension fork, you couldn't really do well off road anyway, so at that point I say why bother.

Aluminum bikes have a reputation for being a little stiff or harsh or buzzy. Steel and carbon less so. I'm not saying alu bikes are crap. They are not. But I personally prefer a less harsh material, OR at least a fork made of non aluminum.

In an ideal world, you'd have one dedicated mountain bike with a good quality fork for offroad. A non suspended more narrow tired efficient bike onroad. When you want one bike to do it all, you have to ask yourself where you want the bias or the compromise. Do you want a bike that is good on road and passable on light off road? A bike that is great off road but barely acceptable on road? A bike that is mediocre at both? There are a lot of bikes that straddle the line, and some do a lot well. Just depends on your priorities.

My view is not anti suspension. It's just go big or go home. Either sink the money into a suspension that is of good quality, or don't even bother with it at all. The worst of all worlds to me is a bike with a cheap suspension fork. I suspect the reason a lot of less expensive hybird bikes have a suspension fork is that it looks cool on the showroom floor and helps sell bikes. Not that it's good or really that functional.

It's like megapixels with digital cameras. All these people with tiny point and shoots buy based on high megapixel counts. Problem is, it's a waste because they have a tiny sensor. A cam with a better sensor and less MP would take better pics. But the public is all about high pixel counts. Marketing.

In the end, it comes down to what kind of riding you'll do 75% of the time, and what you want to spend.

Last edited by syncro87; 06-11-14 at 06:22 PM.
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Old 06-11-14, 06:40 PM   #5
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The lockout is for on road riding. It keeps the suspension from moving when you are on a hard surface like pavement. If you didn't have a lockout, the suspension would move when you pedaled and that would suck away efficiency.

Others may correct me here, but a decent suspension fork, if I'm not off base, would have 100mm of travel. As important as the travel, would be the damping ability and rebound damping. Also, you have stanchion (the tube) thickness. A thicker stanchion is stiffer and better.

So, as a general rule, you'd want the thickest stanchions you could get and the longest travel. You'd also probably want air damping or something. I'm not a fork expert by any means. I tried to learn about them when I was shopping for a MTB a year ago. So you'd want to ask someone more versed than myself.

I think if you had a low end suspension fork, you couldn't really do well off road anyway, so at that point I say why bother.

Aluminum bikes have a reputation for being a little stiff or harsh or buzzy. Steel and carbon less so. I'm not saying alu bikes are crap. They are not. But I personally prefer a less harsh material, OR at least a fork made of non aluminum.

In an ideal world, you'd have one dedicated mountain bike with a good quality fork for offroad. A non suspended more narrow tired efficient bike onroad. When you want one bike to do it all, you have to ask yourself where you want the bias or the compromise. Do you want a bike that is good on road and passable on light off road? A bike that is great off road but barely acceptable on road? A bike that is mediocre at both? There are a lot of bikes that straddle the line, and some do a lot well. Just depends on your priorities.

My view is not anti suspension. It's just go big or go home. Either sink the money into a suspension that is of good quality, or don't even bother with it at all. The worst of all worlds to me is a bike with a cheap suspension fork. I suspect the reason a lot of less expensive hybird bikes have a suspension fork is that it looks cool on the showroom floor and helps sell bikes. Not that it's good or really that functional.

It's like megapixels with digital cameras. All these people with tiny point and shoots buy based on high megapixel counts. Problem is, it's a waste because they have a tiny sensor. A cam with a better sensor and less MP would take better pics. But the public is all about high pixel counts. Marketing.

In the end, it comes down to what kind of riding you'll do 75% of the time, and what you want to spend.
Wow, that's really interesting the way you explained it. Makes a lot of sense on how the marketing and consumerism gets you off track. I totally get your point now. Having said that, what other make/model would you recommend? Like something from Specialized or Trek or even Cannondale's other line of bikes?

Honestly, I want something that looks cool and has some useful features, like disc brakes, front suspension with lockout, and good set of shifters and derailleur along with light weight wheels with less spokes (maybe it's the consumer inside me that's wanting all of the above).

Really, for neighborhood riding, park bicycle trails, some road cycling in group with some future off road, what will be a best bike? I don't mind spending extra, but I want one good bike that I can enjoy for years.

Thank you for taking the time to respond. I really appreciate it and looking forward to your feedback.

-BB
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Old 06-11-14, 07:22 PM   #6
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Lewisville, TX here, and I've got nothing to offer on the Cannondale bikes. I ride a Fuji Absolute 2.1, but will say welcome all the same from another DFW resident!
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Old 06-11-14, 07:29 PM   #7
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Sounds like you want an all rounder. A bike that can do a little of everything.

I've looked at two such bikes lately that intrigued me. The Specialized AWOL and the Salsa Vaya. The key appeal to me, of those bikes, is that they are steel and are versatile.

A more road oriented bike that I can't find in stock locally, but on paper appeals to me a lot is the Jamis Coda line.

Some of your goals above strike me as a little bit contradictory. For instance, you like the look of cool wheels with fewer spokes. Agreed, they look cool. Keep in mind that unless you have a bazillion dollars, in general the more spokes you have, the stronger the wheel. If you're going any off road, especially enough off road to need suspension, you are going to want high spoke count, aesthetics be darned.

I see 4 things you want to do. Three of them take one kind of bike, the fourth takes a different kind of bike. That tells me that 3/4 of your time will be on road or on an improved bike trail. So, I would buy a bike that had 75% of it's strengths on road.

You might consider a cyclocross bike. Kind of a mix.

Get out there and sit on some bikes and ride some bikes. You'll then get an idea of what you like, and can narrow the field down a little bit.

Brakes. You'll find a lot of people prefer rim brakes and a lot like disc brakes. They both have pros and cons. The discs look cool but don't automatically assume they are smart for you. They primarily are of use in wet weather. Discs stop better when wet than rim brakes. Ask yourself, how often will I ride in rain? If you say almost never, then consider whether discs are a must have for you. Discs can be more finicky than rim brakes, too, so maybe a disadvantage.

Keep in mind general rules. These are not hard and fast, but are generalities. Steel or carbon is smoother than aluminum. Rim brakes are less fussy than disc brakes. Higher spoke counts mean stronger wheels. No suspension is better than cheap low quality suspension. You pay more for lighter weight. You get what you pay for.

Best way I can say it is decide what things are your priorities, and what things you don't care about. Go sit and demo ride some bikes. Try to play devils advocate with yourself if you get too hot on one particular bike, and take a step back. You'll find what you are drawn to.

A company named Surly makes some cool bikes, steel. If you have a dealer near you, check them out. Bikes like the Ogre, Troll, etc might be good options for you in addition to those I've mentioned.

I know only enough to be dangerous. 80% of the forum is smarter than me. See if you can find an AWOL and a Vaya around your area to eyeball.

Oh, noticed that you are fortunate to live in a town with an REI store. Good place to look at a bunch of bikes. Fantastic return policy. If you get the wrong bike there, you can exchange it. Can't say that at many stores. Might be a big thing to consider in your case. I'd drop by and take a look around.
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Old 06-11-14, 08:26 PM   #8
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The suspension forks on the Quick CX aren't really intended for major jumps and flying off cliffs, more for trail riding that might be a bit too much for the regular Quicks. It really depends what your true intentions are for riding before you decide how much fork you need. If you have some tough, pot-holed roads, grassy patches between the bike trails, or gravel trails, etc. The CX quicks might be the choice, the Trek DS series really gives some nice options as well.
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Old 06-16-14, 10:57 AM   #9
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Sounds like you want an all rounder. A bike that can do a little of everything.

I've looked at two such bikes lately that intrigued me. The Specialized AWOL and the Salsa Vaya. The key appeal to me, of those bikes, is that they are steel and are versatile.

A more road oriented bike that I can't find in stock locally, but on paper appeals to me a lot is the Jamis Coda line.

Some of your goals above strike me as a little bit contradictory. For instance, you like the look of cool wheels with fewer spokes. Agreed, they look cool. Keep in mind that unless you have a bazillion dollars, in general the more spokes you have, the stronger the wheel. If you're going any off road, especially enough off road to need suspension, you are going to want high spoke count, aesthetics be darned.

I see 4 things you want to do. Three of them take one kind of bike, the fourth takes a different kind of bike. That tells me that 3/4 of your time will be on road or on an improved bike trail. So, I would buy a bike that had 75% of it's strengths on road.

You might consider a cyclocross bike. Kind of a mix.

Get out there and sit on some bikes and ride some bikes. You'll then get an idea of what you like, and can narrow the field down a little bit.

Brakes. You'll find a lot of people prefer rim brakes and a lot like disc brakes. They both have pros and cons. The discs look cool but don't automatically assume they are smart for you. They primarily are of use in wet weather. Discs stop better when wet than rim brakes. Ask yourself, how often will I ride in rain? If you say almost never, then consider whether discs are a must have for you. Discs can be more finicky than rim brakes, too, so maybe a disadvantage.

Keep in mind general rules. These are not hard and fast, but are generalities. Steel or carbon is smoother than aluminum. Rim brakes are less fussy than disc brakes. Higher spoke counts mean stronger wheels. No suspension is better than cheap low quality suspension. You pay more for lighter weight. You get what you pay for.

Best way I can say it is decide what things are your priorities, and what things you don't care about. Go sit and demo ride some bikes. Try to play devils advocate with yourself if you get too hot on one particular bike, and take a step back. You'll find what you are drawn to.

A company named Surly makes some cool bikes, steel. If you have a dealer near you, check them out. Bikes like the Ogre, Troll, etc might be good options for you in addition to those I've mentioned.

I know only enough to be dangerous. 80% of the forum is smarter than me. See if you can find an AWOL and a Vaya around your area to eyeball.

Oh, noticed that you are fortunate to live in a town with an REI store. Good place to look at a bunch of bikes. Fantastic return policy. If you get the wrong bike there, you can exchange it. Can't say that at many stores. Might be a big thing to consider in your case. I'd drop by and take a look around.
Thank you for all the information and feedback. I visited 2 LBS and one suggested a Large framesize, the other suggested XL framesize. Also they recommended either Cannondale Quick CX 3 (Decent Equipment) or Cannondale Quick CX 2 (Better Equipment - Pricey) or Trek DS 8.4 (Decent Equipment) and 8.5 (Better Equipment - Pricey).

REI doesn't carry Trek, they only carry Cannondale, because there are other dealers in DFW; Cannondale doesn't allow them to sell the bike in any of their Dallas Stores. I will have to order one and drive to Austin to pick up from their Austin Store. Then I can bring that to Dallas store for any service.

I am soo confused between Cannondale and Trek. Also, the Cannondale Quick CX2 in XL is sold out. LBS will need to order it from another dealer. Requires full payment upfront. They will find a Quick CX3 in XL for me to try and see if I feel comfortable. Or they can find a Trek DS 8.4 in XL and have me try that.

I am 36 years old; 6ft tall with long torso. LBS also mentioned that Cannondale is suited for people with long torso vs Trek is for short torso.

Please help!!
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Old 06-16-14, 11:25 AM   #10
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I'm 36. 6'1 with a 30 inch inseam. I ride a Cannondale Quick CX 5 large size frame. I love it. Very versatile, I use it for 20+ mile road rides with the fork locked out, and on gravel/trails with the fork unlocked. It does everything I ask without any hesitation or mechanical issues. Is it as fast as a road bike on the road? Nope. Is it great at single track? No. But, it sounds like you are riding similarly to what I do, and for that, the CX series is great. The better bikes in the series have better components, but they all ride similarly except the CX 4 which has a rigid fork. I did add single sided Platform/SPD pedals and some ergon bar ends for extra hand positions, but otherwise mine is stock. Great bikes.
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Old 06-16-14, 12:13 PM   #11
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Or they can find a Trek DS 8.4 in XL and have me try that.

I am 36 years old; 6ft tall with long torso. LBS also mentioned that Cannondale is suited for people with long torso vs Trek is for short torso.

Please help!!
Do Trek call the 22.5" frame, "XL"?

I'm surprised that they are recommending a bike that large for you.

I would have thought that most people who are 6 ft, would be split between the 19" & 21", depending on torso length.
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Old 06-17-14, 03:27 PM   #12
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Do Trek call the 22.5" frame, "XL"?

I'm surprised that they are recommending a bike that large for you.

I would have thought that most people who are 6 ft, would be split between the 19" & 21", depending on torso length.
Thanks for all the replies everyone. I visited another LBS today and tried the 2014 Cannondale Quick CX 2 and 2014 Trek DS 8.5; I liked both the CX 2 better in ride and feel. DS also better in ride, felt little heavy. The LBS guy (Service Manager) suggested I stick to what I felt comfortable. He mentioned that CX 2, 3 or 4 are good bikes. The CX 2 and DS 8.5 go head to head with what they carry component wise.

Quick CX 2 - QUICK CX - RECREATION - RECREATION & URBAN - BIKES - 2014

vs

8.5 DS - Trek Bicycle


Please give me your valuable feedback and experience as to which has the bang for the buck, also the quality or experience with the parts that these bikes bring.

Thanks again!!
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Old 06-19-14, 11:13 AM   #13
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I have a quick cx2 and have been very pleased it for a short commute it is very comfortable and still manage a decent average speed.

To be honest find it easier ride than my cross bike but I guess I prefer flat bars

The shocks are not brilliant but and I find a slight bit of travel on lock out when going hard but nice to have them for potholes and rough roads
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Old 06-19-14, 12:40 PM   #14
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Don't be afraid of the "trekking forks" as they are known elsewhere. Just make sure it is able to be locked out, for climbing. These suspensions are very well suited for Hybrid use.

They are very capable and trouble free, for their intended use, which is NOT a full out mountain bike!
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