Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Hybrid Bicycles Where else would you go to discuss these fun, versatile bikes?

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 06-13-14, 09:03 PM   #1
prime winner
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: North East Florida
Bikes: 2016 Cannondale Quick Speed 1 , 2014 Trek 7.2 FX Disc
Posts: 70
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
new 7.4 FX and Ive got $200 to spend on accessories. suggestions?

I just picked up a new 7.4 FX and Ive got $200 to spend on accessories.

what I want to improve on: speed, comfort. I want to go fast and I want to go far (I know my motor needs upgrading too).

would it be best to ...

1) buy these aero bars for $105 ..... aero bars . dont care what looks I may get, Im improving MY ride.
2) smaller tires? if so, suggestions? (I currently have 700x32, and dont mind upgrading because I can transfer the 32's to 7.2 FX)
3) upgrade crank or cassette?
4) change stem?
5) pedal straps?
6) something not mentioned here?

thanks !!!

EDIT :

items that I have, or plan to buy but wont count against the $200 Id like to spend on upgrades
garmin edge 200 bike computer
basic front/rear lights (walmart low budget style)
saddle bag
frame pump
bottle cage
helmet & gloves
kryptolok U lock with cable
topeak alien II tool kit
spare tube & patch kit
cycling shorts

Last edited by prime winner; 06-14-14 at 07:41 AM.
prime winner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-14, 09:08 PM   #2
MRT2
Senior Member
 
MRT2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Wisconsin
Bikes: 2012 Salsa Casseroll, 1997 Bianchi Advantage, 1994 Trek 930.
Posts: 4,103
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
I would say none of the above. Unless you have some particular area of concern, why change anything? Maybe get bar ends, clip less pedals and shoes, shorts. Then ride. Lots.
MRT2 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-14, 09:13 PM   #3
NormanF
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 5,370
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I think your tires are fine. The biggest upgrade you might want to make in the future are fenders/rack if you intend to go commuting with it.

Otherwise leave it stock. You do not want thinner tires - the speed gain isn't much and wider tires provide suspension on rough roads.
NormanF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-14, 09:25 PM   #4
02Giant 
Home School Valedictorian
 
02Giant's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Iowa
Bikes: 13 Orbea Orca Bronze
Posts: 1,282
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
The aero bars would let you get in a better position for speed while still having the flat bars for comfort. Your current tires are considered ultra low rolling resistance by Bontrager, not likely to be much improvement changing them.
i would put some miles on it, you may find a change of saddle is needed or as the previous reply, clip-less shoes, shorts, etc.
__________________
We've got no fear, no doubt, all in balls out
02Giant is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-14, 09:29 PM   #5
MRT2
Senior Member
 
MRT2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Wisconsin
Bikes: 2012 Salsa Casseroll, 1997 Bianchi Advantage, 1994 Trek 930.
Posts: 4,103
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by 02Giant View Post
The aero bars would let you get in a better position for speed while still having the flat bars for comfort. Your current tires are considered ultra low rolling resistance by Bontrager, not likely to be much improvement changing them.
i would put some miles on it, you may find a change of saddle is needed or as the previous reply, clip-less shoes, shorts, etc.
I hate the look of aero bars on a hybrid. Just a personal thing, but IMO they look ugly.
MRT2 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-14, 09:31 PM   #6
a1penguin
Senior Member
 
a1penguin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Silicon Valley, CA
Bikes:
Posts: 2,722
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Save your $200 for a road bike :-) Seriously. The 7.4 is an awesome bike and you should ride the daylights out of it. You probably want some bar end grips (Ergons?) to provide additional hand positions. I'm a fan of clipless pedals or at least to clips so that you can pedal hard without risking your foot sliding off the pedal. Get a $35 cyclocomputer to track your speed. I like the Cateye wireless. If you want to get faster, you need a good training regimen. Intervals, hills and long rides provide different benefits.

If you are changing cassette and crank and tires and stem, you probably bought the wrong bike.
a1penguin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-14, 09:32 PM   #7
02Giant 
Home School Valedictorian
 
02Giant's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Iowa
Bikes: 13 Orbea Orca Bronze
Posts: 1,282
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
I hate the look of aero bars on a hybrid. Just a personal thing, but IMO they look ugly.
i tend to agree, I considered it on my hybrid, ended up buying a road bike instead.
__________________
We've got no fear, no doubt, all in balls out
02Giant is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-14, 10:08 PM   #8
corwin1968
Senior Member
 
corwin1968's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Bikes:
Posts: 1,259
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Tires would be the number one upgrade to increase speed.

The most practical recommendation I can make is to buy a Garmin GPS computer. I just bought one a month or so ago and it's awesome.
corwin1968 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-14, 10:16 PM   #9
TakingMyTime
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Los Alamitos, Calif.
Bikes: Trek 7.4 FX
Posts: 430
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Keep it stock. Buy a rack, a nice bag for the rack, a couple of water bottles and some cages, a capable pump, emergency tools, a couple of spare tubes. If you want a little more aero position flip the stem and/or rearrange the spacers on the steerer tube so you'll be in a bit more of an aero position. But for God's sake, first ride the heck out of the thing for at least 6 months before trying to make it go "faster".
TakingMyTime is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-14, 10:27 PM   #10
raqball
Senior Member
 
raqball's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Bikes:
Posts: 694
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Keep it stock and ride it like you stole it!

Updage the parts as they wear out. Use that cool $200 smackers for some clipless pedals, cycling shoes, water bottles, a frame pump, a saddle bag to hold an extra tube, patches and tire levers..

Nice bike, ride it!
raqball is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-14, 05:07 AM   #11
Jaeger99
Senior Member
 
Jaeger99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Ontario, Canada
Bikes: Me: Trek 7.2 FX Disc, Pinarello Rokh Her: Electra Townie 3i
Posts: 358
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Useful accessories that I added to my 7.2:

1) Decent quality lights. I do a lot of pre-dawn rides, and for any daytime rides in traffic, a front light in invaluable when approaching intersections. Rear lights from dusk until dawn are pretty much essential if you don't want to end up as road kill.
2) Bike computer. If you want to go faster and farther it definitely helps to know how fast and far you are going in the first place.
3) Saddle bag. Self-explanatory.
4) Water bottle / cage. Essential.

Useful upgrades:

1) Grips with integrated bar ends. The standard grips didn't do much to soak up vibration - though you may have better ones on the 7.4. On longer rides, the additional hand position is VERY welcome. I find the bar ends also work a treat when out of the saddle and also on tighter turns.

2) Clipless pedals / cleated shoes. More efficient pedal stroke, feet always properly positioned on the pedal and never slip off at just the wrong time.

Not sure why you would want to upgrade cassette / crank / stem, but then I have never really understood upgrading as a sport unto itself.



Jaeger99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-14, 05:12 AM   #12
Jaeger99
Senior Member
 
Jaeger99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Ontario, Canada
Bikes: Me: Trek 7.2 FX Disc, Pinarello Rokh Her: Electra Townie 3i
Posts: 358
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
PS - just noticed you have a 7.2 FX Disc as well - are you selling that one? I can well imagine having two bikes (and probably will at some point in the not too distant future), but not two that are as close as these.
Jaeger99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-14, 06:37 AM   #13
spdracr39
Senior Member
 
spdracr39's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Cabot, Arkansas
Bikes: Lynskey Twisted Helix Di2 Ti, 1987 Orbea steel single speed/fixie, Orbea Avant M30, Trek Fuel EX9.8 29, Trek Madone 5 series, Specialized Epic Carbon Comp 29er, Trek 7.1F
Posts: 1,519
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
[QUOTE=Jaeger99;16850142]Useful accessories that I added to my 7.2:

1) Decent quality lights. I do a lot of pre-dawn rides, and for any daytime rides in traffic, a front light in invaluable when approaching intersections. Rear lights from dusk until dawn are pretty much essential if you don't want to end up as road kill.
2) Bike computer. If you want to go faster and farther it definitely helps to know how fast and far you are going in the first place.
3) Saddle bag. Self-explanatory.
4) Water bottle / cage. Essential.

Useful upgrades:

1) Grips with integrated bar ends. The standard grips didn't do much to soak up vibration - though you may have better ones on the 7.4. On longer rides, the additional hand position is VERY welcome. I find the bar ends also work a treat when out of the saddle and also on tighter turns.

2) Clipless pedals / cleated shoes. More efficient pedal stroke, feet always properly positioned on the pedal and never slip off at just the wrong time.

Not sure why you would want to upgrade cassette / crank / stem, but then I have never really understood upgrading as a sport unto itself.

QUOTE]

This stuff is essential for safety, convenience, and comfort. I am glad to see someone else has an added kick stand. They may be "uncool" but the practicality outwieghs what others think.

To add to the list padded shorts, gloves, helmet, and a good quality jersey

Last edited by spdracr39; 06-14-14 at 06:38 AM. Reason: added info
spdracr39 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-14, 06:52 AM   #14
WestPablo
Banned.
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 1,557
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
I hate the look of aero bars on a hybrid. Just a personal thing, but IMO they look ugly.
Quote:
Originally Posted by a1penguin View Post
Save your $200 for a road bike :-) Seriously. The 7.4 is an awesome bike and you should ride the daylights out of it. You probably want some bar end grips (Ergons?) to provide additional hand positions. I'm a fan of clipless pedals or at least to clips so that you can pedal hard without risking your foot sliding off the pedal. Get a $35 cyclocomputer to track your speed. I like the Cateye wireless. If you want to get faster, you need a good training regimen. Intervals, hills and long rides provide different benefits.

If you are changing cassette and crank and tires and stem, you probably bought the wrong bike.
I agree with these guys!
WestPablo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-14, 06:55 AM   #15
WestPablo
Banned.
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 1,557
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'd invest in a really good U-Lock (like the NY Fahgettaboudit), a nice pair of gloves, an Xmart helmet, a rack, and some really nice fenders...
WestPablo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-14, 07:39 AM   #16
prime winner
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: North East Florida
Bikes: 2016 Cannondale Quick Speed 1 , 2014 Trek 7.2 FX Disc
Posts: 70
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
first of all thanks so much to everyone for all of the input. so much good information and I really appreciate the input. I do plan to keep training my motor, but want to use this $200 while I have it.

a couple of quick hits; 1) I chose my 7.4 FX over a road bike because I like the versatility, 2) my FX is for exercise and pleasure on paved roads/simple paths, no need for racks or fenders.

Ive updated the first post to show the items I currently have, or will buy but will not count towards the $200 I have to play with.

Im think maybe aero bars and tires since I want faster rides, and longer rides. comfort and speed will help me a lot I think. but Im not ruling out other upgrades if they would be better use of my $.

I know I will add drop bar ends (not out of the $200 for other upgrades), and regular bar ends if I can fit them without sacrificing room for aero bars. below is my wifes 7.2 FX....




will clamp on aero bars fit at the wide middle of my 7.4 handlebars.


Last edited by prime winner; 06-14-14 at 07:43 AM.
prime winner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-14, 08:12 AM   #17
Wanderer
aka Phil Jungels
 
Wanderer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: North Aurora, IL
Bikes: 08 Specialized Crosstrail Sport, 05 Sirrus Comp
Posts: 7,552
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Tires won't do anything for you.............. from 32 to 25, you are talking about 1/4 inch in width, at a huge sacrifice of comfort....... Pump em up to max and be done with that. Just decide how you are going t use the bike, and then add things that will make it more functional. TT bars on the front of that thing is like putting lipstick on a pig. But it is YOUR bike................

My suggestion s to keep this one as a Utility bike, and spare ---- then try to scrape up some more cash, and go to Performance this weekend, and buy a Fuji Roubaix road bike. Then use their cashback o buy aero bars for that.

http://www.performancebike.com/bikes...551_1147744_-1 minus almost $170 cash back

Last edited by Wanderer; 06-14-14 at 08:18 AM.
Wanderer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-14, 04:44 PM   #18
MRT2
Senior Member
 
MRT2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Wisconsin
Bikes: 2012 Salsa Casseroll, 1997 Bianchi Advantage, 1994 Trek 930.
Posts: 4,103
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Seems like a lot of stuff to be putting on the bars. Aero bars, bar ends, and drop bar extensions?

Don't take this as criticism, but given that you already had a Trek FX, and given that you seem to be trying to turn your 7.4 into a road bike with drop bar extensions, why not just buy a road bike? In the long run, it would be cheaper than what you are doing with your 7.4. If versatility is the issue, there is a whole class of cross bikes with drop bars like the Trek Cross Rip, Kona Jake, Surly Cross Check, or Specialized Tri Cross.
MRT2 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-14, 05:01 PM   #19
raqball
Senior Member
 
raqball's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Bikes:
Posts: 694
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Based on your edited list in the OP I would pocket the $200 and do nothing but ride the bike..

Also define wanting to go fast and distance please.

I have a flat bar bike and on flats I average 20mph. I go 40 miles a day, once a week I do 60'ish and every so often I do a century.. I don't have aero bars and I don't have the drop bar end add ons either.

I have bar ends and I would recommend them..

My .02
raqball is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-14, 05:20 PM   #20
prime winner
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: North East Florida
Bikes: 2016 Cannondale Quick Speed 1 , 2014 Trek 7.2 FX Disc
Posts: 70
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I take all the info here as constructive critism . Im here for the info and suggestions that all of you experienced riders ave. Im a newbie and I appreciate all of the input from everyone.

I dont plan to put standard bar end AND drop bar bar ends on my 7.4 because I dont think they will fit (due to the isofit) like they did on the 7.2 in the pic above. so I figure the drop bar ends would be more useful than the regular bar ends since I could get lower. I would like to add aero bars because when Ive taken the 7.2 on 10 mile rides I sometimes lay my arms across the handlebars and find that I can peddle easier against the wind and its almost like resting. but I dont know if the aero bars will fit on the 7.4 looking at the pic above. keep in mind I will need to slide the grips in just a bit for the drop bar ends Id like to add.



Quote:
Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
Seems like a lot of stuff to be putting on the bars. Aero bars, bar ends, and drop bar extensions?

Don't take this as criticism, but given that you already had a Trek FX, and given that you seem to be trying to turn your 7.4 into a road bike with drop bar extensions, why not just buy a road bike? In the long run, it would be cheaper than what you are doing with your 7.4. If versatility is the issue, there is a whole class of cross bikes with drop bars like the Trek Cross Rip, Kona Jake, Surly Cross Check, or Specialized Tri Cross.
the FX 7.2 is the wifes bike, sometimes we ride together. I bought the 7.4 instead of the road bike because I like the choice of riding upright or down low. my budget was $800.

Quote:
Originally Posted by raqball View Post
Based on your edited list in the OP I would pocket the $200 and do nothing but ride the bike..

Also define wanting to go fast and distance please.

I have a flat bar bike and on flats I average 20mph. I go 40 miles a day, once a week I do 60'ish and every so often I do a century.. I don't have aero bars and I don't have the drop bar end add ons either.

I have bar ends and I would recommend them..

My .02
when I say I want to go fast I mean Id like cruise at 18-20mph average over 10-20-30 miles. by distance I mean that I would like to take my FX on rides of 50-100 miles some day. your speed and distance is inspiring!
prime winner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-14, 05:27 PM   #21
MRT2
Senior Member
 
MRT2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Wisconsin
Bikes: 2012 Salsa Casseroll, 1997 Bianchi Advantage, 1994 Trek 930.
Posts: 4,103
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by prime winner View Post
I take all the info here as constructive critism . Im here for the info and suggestions that all of you experienced riders ave. Im a newbie and I appreciate all of the input from everyone.

I dont plan to put standard bar end AND drop bar bar ends on my 7.4 because I dont think they will fit (due to the isofit) like they did on the 7.2 in the pic above. so I figure the drop bar ends would be more useful than the regular bar ends since I could get lower. I would like to add aero bars because when Ive taken the 7.2 on 10 mile rides I sometimes lay my arms across the handlebars and find that I can peddle easier against the wind and its almost like resting. but I dont know if the aero bars will fit on the 7.4 looking at the pic above. keep in mind I will need to slide the grips in just a bit for the drop bar ends Id like to add.





the FX 7.2 is the wifes bike, sometimes we ride together. I bought the 7.4 instead of the road bike because I like the choice of riding upright or down low. my budget was $800.



when I say I want to go fast I mean Id like cruise at 18-20mph average over 10-20-30 miles. by distance I mean that I would like to take my FX on rides of 50-100 miles some day. your speed and distance is inspiring!
Again, confused. That is what a drop bar road bike or in the alternative, one of the cross bikes I listed offers, with multiple hand positions on tops, ramps, hoods and drops as opposed to a flat bar. In other words, you can sit up high in the tops, or down low in the drops, or in between on the ramps or the hoods. And given that you are contemplating $200 for upgrades, sounds like your budget is actually closer to $1,000, which is within reach of some of the very fine do anything road bikes available these days.

No matter. you made your decision. Just ride your 7.4 as is. Where you are now isn't where you will be in 6 months or a year if you ride regularly. If you want to ride 18 to 20 mph, for 50 to 100 ride, just ride. You will get there.

Last edited by MRT2; 06-14-14 at 05:39 PM.
MRT2 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-14, 05:39 PM   #22
prime winner
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: North East Florida
Bikes: 2016 Cannondale Quick Speed 1 , 2014 Trek 7.2 FX Disc
Posts: 70
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I hear you, but $800 was all I would spend on a bike. the $200 on add ons would have been contemplated even if I bought a road bike. I didnt buy the road bike because I like the hybrid body position over the road bike aggressive position. with the aero bars and drop bar bar ends I can switch when I want, or ride upright when I want. I did strongly consider a road bike.
prime winner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-14, 07:43 AM   #23
Wanderer
aka Phil Jungels
 
Wanderer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: North Aurora, IL
Bikes: 08 Specialized Crosstrail Sport, 05 Sirrus Comp
Posts: 7,552
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Butttttt, they are two different types of bikes.........

Just ride the Trek the way it is, and consider it a utility bike........ it will always be very handy!

Then, start saving your sheckels for next year, when Performance has their triple points weekend, and consider one of those Fuji Roubaix's for your other type of riding...... which was my reason for suggesting that in an earlier post. Those Fujis are really nice bikes, and excellent value when you can get on one of their special promotions.

Does Performance do law aways? I don't know! If they do, that $200 might be a good down payment this weekend, and find some way to earn a few extra dollars........... MHO

edit: And, believe me, I'm not one to tout road bikes on the Hybrid Forum - but it sure sounds like that is what you are striving to create. Advice - don't put lipstick on the pig, just relish it for the bacon and hams it will provide. Save the lipstick for the Roubaix.

Last edited by Wanderer; 06-15-14 at 07:48 AM.
Wanderer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-14, 08:11 AM   #24
Jaeger99
Senior Member
 
Jaeger99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Ontario, Canada
Bikes: Me: Trek 7.2 FX Disc, Pinarello Rokh Her: Electra Townie 3i
Posts: 358
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hmmm. I would neither describe the FX as a "pig" nor the purchase of accessories for it pointless "lipstick". It's not a road bike, but that doesn't mean you can't ride it a good long way, and make additions / upgrades to make your riding safer, more efficient and more comfortable. Making it go faster is largely down to your legs and lungs - and riding the heck out of it will accomplish that.

I'm not hating on road bikes - I'm looking to add one to my FX as we speak. But this notion that a Hybrid is some kind of second class citizen is a pile of rubbish, IMO. It's not a bike that you merely tolerate while you save up for a "real" bike. Different tools for different jobs - that is all.
Jaeger99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-14, 08:21 AM   #25
MRT2
Senior Member
 
MRT2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Wisconsin
Bikes: 2012 Salsa Casseroll, 1997 Bianchi Advantage, 1994 Trek 930.
Posts: 4,103
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaeger99 View Post
Hmmm. I would neither describe the FX as a "pig" nor the purchase of accessories for it pointless "lipstick". It's not a road bike, but that doesn't mean you can't ride it a good long way, and make additions / upgrades to make your riding safer, more efficient and more comfortable. Making it go faster is largely down to your legs and lungs - and riding the heck out of it will accomplish that.

I'm not hating on road bikes - I'm looking to add one to my FX as we speak. But this notion that a Hybrid is some kind of second class citizen is a pile of rubbish, IMO. It's not a bike that you merely tolerate while you save up for a "real" bike. Different tools for different jobs - that is all.
But OP seems to want a road bike, but building one an odd way. Sort of like buying a set of work boots and trying to turn them into running shoes.

Hybrids can be versatile, but so can road bikes these days. Or not. You can get a road bike as a do (almost) anything bike or one purpose built for speed. Your choice.

As for modding a hybrid, IMO some mods make sense, some don't. Set your hybrid up as a commuter or long distance touring bike? Sure. Set it up as a triathlon bike or for racing? Um, no.

Last edited by MRT2; 06-15-14 at 08:26 AM.
MRT2 is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:32 PM.