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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ozonation View Post
    Very true, and I hope they succeed. I would not by any stretch call myself a hardcore cyclist - I'd say "enthusiast" is a better word! And I like shiny things. But I think bikes really are misunderstood these days, and more power to Priority for offering choice.

    A new LBS opened up in my city about 18 months ago specializing in urban cycling, and have they ever proven popular! I think people have realized that biking can be simple and practical. There's nothing wrong with spandex and a $5000 carbon fiber bike... but I suspect that's not what the regular person wants. I recall at another LBS while I waiting... a middle aged, somewhat portly gentleman walks in and discloses he hasn't ridden in about 20 years... and next thing I know, he's trying out a $1000+ flat bar road bike. I don't want to be elitist and hey, I'm as guilty as anybody else for wanting to "buy the best", but somehow, I don't think the bike was a good match given his needs or even wants.
    I want to make it clear I'm not against bike shops or the expensive bikes they sell. They offer good service and value for those who can afford them. They're an important resource for cyclists and for people who are looking for something challenging, they're the right place to buy from. But not every one can afford to buy from a bike shop and I don't think its fair to force regular people to buy a heavy bike in one size from a big box store. People should be able to buy a high quality bike in their budget that allows them to do what they want to do. Regular folks may be looking for a simple bike to ride with family and friends and to have fun. That's where a company like Priority Bicycles comes into the picture. You tap into a market bike companies don't think about that don't have that kind of disposable income and offer people a high quality product at an affordable price... I think it happens to be a good business model. And if its sold online, its not really that big a hurdle. If they can figure out how to do it, they could establish a presence with people who don't know a lot about bikes but who can appreciate good value.

  2. #27
    Senior Member Ozonation's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NormanF View Post
    I want to make it clear I'm not against bike shops or the expensive bikes they sell. They offer good service and value for those who can afford them. They're an important resource for cyclists and for people who are looking for something challenging, they're the right place to buy from.
    Never thought you were against them! There's something for everyone after all...
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  3. #28
    Senior Member ColonelSanders's Avatar
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    So what would the lowest gear on this bike be like for climbing hills?
    You can have my Disc Brakes, when you pry them from my cold, dead hands.

  4. #29
    Senior Member ColonelSanders's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DorkDisk View Post
    So its a 3 speed belt drive, whats so novel about that? If they cant get the shifter cable length right, what else did they miss? The marketing BS sounds like a bad infomercial. One speed too little, 7 speeds too much, 3 speeds just right -whatever.
    Hah, I was doing a WTF over this too.
    You can have my Disc Brakes, when you pry them from my cold, dead hands.

  5. #30
    Senior Member Jaeger99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ColonelSanders View Post
    Hah, I was doing a WTF over this too.
    I'm sure a lot of people were. But I suppose if they are drying to dupe - I mean - appeal to those who know very little about bicycles, that is the kind of simple (but completely bogus) message that could work.

    Admittedly, it's not a segment with which I have any great familiarity - but is a simple decent-quality $400 commuter bike something that at present really doesn't exist in the market?
    Last edited by Jaeger99; 07-16-14 at 04:35 AM.

  6. #31
    Senior Member ColonelSanders's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaeger99 View Post
    I'm sure a lot of people were. But I suppose if they are drying to dupe - I mean - appeal to those who know very little about bicycles, that is the kind of simple (but completely bogus) message that could work.

    Admittedly, it's not a segment with which I have any great familiarity - but is a simple decent-quality $400 commuter bike something that at present really doesn't exist in the market?
    I would say that there isn't this gap that this new hybrid plugs.

    This new bike would only fill a small niche like those who want a fixed gear bike.
    You can have my Disc Brakes, when you pry them from my cold, dead hands.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaeger99 View Post
    I'm sure a lot of people were. But I suppose if they are drying to dupe - I mean - appeal to those who know very little about bicycles, that is the kind of simple (but completely bogus) message that could work.

    Admittedly, it's not a segment with which I have any great familiarity - but is a simple decent-quality $400 commuter bike something that at present really doesn't exist in the market?
    No. Right now you have low quality Schwinns at big box stores. You know, one size, tipping the weight scale at 40 lbs poorly assembled and hard to ride that go up for $200. Then you have decent entry level bikes at LBS beginning at around $600. There is currently no mid-priced market for a beginner bike around $400.00. So consumer options for people on a budget are rather limited. You can either settle for a bike you don't want or pay more than you want for a high quality bike that may be more than you need. Priority Bicycles wants to fill that missing middle ground with a high quality recreational hybrid in the range of a more reasonable 25 lbs with the right amount of gearing in two sizes that can be sold online for $400.00 and that is simple for buyers to assemble and ride. If it could be done - I am not saying it could be - it could change the face of the bike industry.

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by ColonelSanders View Post
    I would say that there isn't this gap that this new hybrid plugs.

    This new bike would only fill a small niche like those who want a fixed gear bike.
    Its actually the opposite. This new bike caters to average Joe who currently can't afford a nice bike to ride with family and friends and who would be able to buy one online for a reasonable price with no bottom of the barrel cost cutting on bikes that the big box stores do with theirs or the markups bike dealers put up on the big brand bikes that just pushes up the price. If you could get to the sweet middle - that would be fantastic and the market for that isn't a small niche - its potentially huge. And a belt-driven bicycle for $400 - heck, I'd want to buy one if the quality AND the price were spot-on. Priority Bicycles is betting that with beginner bikes that is exactly what's going to happen.

  9. #34
    Senior Member ColonelSanders's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NormanF View Post
    No. Right now you have low quality Schwinns at big box stores. You know, one size, tipping the weight scale at 40 lbs poorly assembled and hard to ride that go up for $200. Then you have decent entry level bikes at LBS beginning at around $600. There is currently no mid-priced market for a beginner bike around $400.00. So consumer options for people on a budget are rather limited. You can either settle for a bike you don't want or pay more than you want for a high quality bike that may be more than you need. Priority Bicycles wants to fill that missing middle ground with a high quality recreational hybrid in the range of a more reasonable 25 lbs with the right amount of gearing in two sizes that can be sold online for $400.00 and that is simple for buyers to assemble and ride. If it could be done - I am not saying it could be - it could change the face of the bike industry.
    $430 - 2015 Giant Roam 3 --> Roam 3 (2015) (2014) | Giant Bicycles | United States
    $340 - 2015 Giant Escape 3 --> Escape 3 (2015) (2014) | Giant Bicycles | United States
    $320 - 2015 Giant Cypress --> Cypress (2015) (2014) | Giant Bicycles | United States

    $440 - Specialized Crossroads --> Specialized Bicycle Components

    $420- Trek 7.0 FX --> 7.0 FX - Trek Bicycle
    You can have my Disc Brakes, when you pry them from my cold, dead hands.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by ColonelSanders View Post
    $430 - 2015 Giant Roam 3 --> Roam 3 (2015) (2014) | Giant Bicycles | United States
    $340 - 2015 Giant Escape 3 --> Escape 3 (2015) (2014) | Giant Bicycles | United States
    $320 - 2015 Giant Cypress --> Cypress (2015) (2014) | Giant Bicycles | United States

    $440 - Specialized Crossroads --> Specialized Bicycle Components

    $420- Trek 7.0 FX --> 7.0 FX - Trek Bicycle
    Chain-driven bicycles sold through bike shops. The bike we talked about on here is a consumer-priced belt-driven bike with IGH gearing. And those bikes, if you can find them, are currently expensive. There are good reviews of some of them on here but they are not a mass market bike - unlike the more conventional hybrid bikes you just listed.

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by NormanF View Post
    Chain-driven bicycles sold through bike shops. The bike we talked about on here is a consumer-priced belt-driven bike with IGH gearing. And those bikes, if you can find them, are currently expensive. There are good reviews of some of them on here but they are not a mass market bike - unlike the more conventional hybrid bikes you just listed.
    Compared to the Giant Escape and the Giant Cypress, consumers will need to believe that it is worth a $60 or $80 premium for a belt drive bike. Add to this that local bike shops will not have nearly the experience servicing belt drives as they will chain drives.

    I hope this company succeeds, but I also agree that this is a bike designed to fill a niche within a niche. That's not necessarily a bad thing, but the company just needs to be realistic about their market position. Parts for belt drive systems must also be much harder to come by. If the company ceases operation, how difficult will it be to find a replacement belt or parts for the hub?

    For the intended use, I really like how this bike has a belt drive. On the other hand, I'm wondering if this is a solution in search of a problem. Do casual bikers have lots of problems with bike chains? After all, aren't these riders generally very easy on their bikes? On the other hand, they also may be the least likely to perform maintenance on their bike - which is where a belt drive will be very helpful.
    Last edited by VTBike; 07-16-14 at 07:22 AM.

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by VTBike View Post
    Compared to the Giant Escape and the Giant Cypress, consumers will need to believe that it is worth a $60 or $80 premium for a belt drive bike. Add to this that local bike shops will not have nearly the experience servicing belt drives as they will chain drives.

    I hope this company succeeds, but I also agree that this is a bike designed to fill a niche within a niche. That's not necessarily a bad thing, but they company just needs to be realistic about their market position. Parts for belt drive systems must also be much harder to come by. If the company ceases operation, how difficult will it be to find a replacement belt or parts for the hub?

    For the intended use, I really like how this bike has a belt drive. On the other hand, I'm wondering if this is a solution in search of a problem. Do casual bikers have lots of problems with bike chains? After all, aren't these riders generally very easy on their bikes? On the other hand, they also may be the least likely to perform maintenance on their bike - which is where a belt drive will be very helpful.
    A belt is a long wearing part. Given the average rider is going to ride a couple of miles a day on city streets and mild dirt trails, wear and tear should be minimal. And the lack of grease means you don't have to worry about dirty pant cuffs. You're talking about people who don't like to fuss much with their bikes. The company's business model, you're right will be a success only if they succeed in making and selling a quality bike. If it doesn't deliver, it will go out of business. We agree that is the uncertain aspect of it. The jury is still out on whether budget-conscious bike buyers would pay a premium for a belt-driven bike. As for the hub, its a standard Shimano Nexus IGH hub and bike shops have replacement parts on hand for it and most bike mechanics can work on it. In my view then, the only real concern is the durability of the belt that replaces the chain. If its like its advertised, this new bike could be a perfect fit for average pootlers who just want a simple and durable bike to ride.

  13. #38
    Senior Member Jaeger99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ColonelSanders View Post
    $430 - 2015 Giant Roam 3 --> Roam 3 (2015) (2014) | Giant Bicycles | United States
    $340 - 2015 Giant Escape 3 --> Escape 3 (2015) (2014) | Giant Bicycles | United States
    $320 - 2015 Giant Cypress --> Cypress (2015) (2014) | Giant Bicycles | United States

    $440 - Specialized Crossroads --> Specialized Bicycle Components

    $420- Trek 7.0 FX --> 7.0 FX - Trek Bicycle
    Spot on. The notion that there aren't any"good" bikes worth recommending at this price point is yet another bogus claim.

  14. #39
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    Most of them are over $400. Only two are less than $400 and you have to wonder what the weight and the components are on those bikes. Its possible to build a decent entry level bike starting around $400. But when you go below that some things have to sacrificed to get to a lower price and its usually quality that suffers first.

  15. #40
    Senior Member okane's Avatar
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    Agree with others on this and other points......

    ...sounds too much like an tv infomercial (nuts vs QR)?? He could have added, "no more messy front brakes to hurt you hands when you squeeze! I definitely think the video needs attention!

    As to the bike: Benefits are low cost/low maintenace? Got a left over Breezer about 3 years ago for $450 (at an LBS) with 24 speeds. I lube the chain regularly (about 10 minutes using my chain cleaner tool) and air up the tires every other ride. To date, 2500 miles and no problems except for flat tires. And it came with front and rear brakes, fenders, rack, and generator front/rear lights! Others have pointed out similiar bikes in this price range.

    I would think that a "bare bones" bike with "no middle man" would be less than $400.

    My biggest concern would be sizing. Will he make a one size frame that fits all? With no chance to try before you buy, I suspect few novices (whch seems to be his target audience) will know what size to buy if he does offer different sizes.

    All in all I'm not impressed at this time that the idea of a lower cost belt drive bike brings a lot to the table.

  16. #41
    Senior Member ColonelSanders's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NormanF View Post
    Most of them are over $400. Only two are less than $400 and you have to wonder what the weight and the components are on those bikes. Its possible to build a decent entry level bike starting around $400. But when you go below that some things have to sacrificed to get to a lower price and its usually quality that suffers first.
    The specs are readily viewable for anyone who clicks on the links I provided.

    As for weight, I'm pretty sure they are under 30 pounds.

    What's more, you can actually go up decent hills on them.

    As long as a bike has a chain guard on the crank, what is the likelihood of having to worry about getting grease on yourself?

    Also, when I am riding in a relaxed manner, I like to reverse peddle as I am cruising along. One can't do that with this Priority hybrid because you will engage the brakes, the only brakes on the bike, because unlike all the bikes I listed, it doesn't come with front brakes either.
    You can have my Disc Brakes, when you pry them from my cold, dead hands.

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by NormanF View Post
    No. Right now you have low quality Schwinns at big box stores. You know, one size, tipping the weight scale at 40 lbs poorly assembled and hard to ride that go up for $200. Then you have decent entry level bikes at LBS beginning at around $600. There is currently no mid-priced market for a beginner bike around $400.00. So consumer options for people on a budget are rather limited. You can either settle for a bike you don't want or pay more than you want for a high quality bike that may be more than you need. Priority Bicycles wants to fill that missing middle ground with a high quality recreational hybrid in the range of a more reasonable 25 lbs with the right amount of gearing in two sizes that can be sold online for $400.00 and that is simple for buyers to assemble and ride. If it could be done - I am not saying it could be - it could change the face of the bike industry.
    Granted, I'm incredibly new to cycling, but I just got a Trek FX 7.2 for $449 at Scheels. (Although MSRP is $499.) I think that's a decently priced "beginner" bike that's above entry level Wal-Mart Schwinn's. No?

    It doesn't seem to me there's a huge "gap" in this area. But, there's nothing wrong with somebody else adding another option.

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by NormanF View Post
    Most of them are over $400.
    Of the five, the most expensive is only $440. With a very small sale, they are all able to purchased at $400 or less. And this almost always includes a free tune-up after purchase.

    I'll throw in some more possibilities:
    - Fuji Absolute 2.3 at $409
    - Fuji Crosstown 2.5 at $389
    - Trek Verve 1 at $440
    - Trek Shift 1 at $440

  19. #44
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    While I appreciate the need to have an economy of scale, I am concerned that there are only two frame sizes.

    Is a chain drive system more important than a properly fitted bike frame? Not for me.
    Last edited by VTBike; 07-16-14 at 04:29 PM.

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by VTBike View Post
    While I appreciate the need to have an economy of scale, I am concerned that there are only two frame sizes.

    Is a chain drive system more important that a properly fitted bike frame? Not for me.
    To keep costs down, two frames sizes to fit most of the bell curve is a workable solution. Bike manufacturers are moving towards having fewer sizes so more people can fit the same bike.

    In the end, the details matter less as you would agree, than the quality of the bike. That remains to be seen.

  21. #46
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    They offer two sizes. One for smaller riders and one for bigger riders in both a diamond frame and a step in model.

    Its a good point. One shouldn't buy it on blind faith. In the end, quality, not just the price matters. I don't buy something just to save on the bottom line.

  22. #47
    Senior Member raqball's Avatar
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    While not my cup of tea, the bike looks good and the price is good..

    I can see them selling these to people who just want to piddle around.. And there is nothing wrong with wanting to piddle around..
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  23. #48
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    The Kickstarter project is doing VERY well. Good for them! More bikes to choose from is never a bad thing.

  24. #49
    Senior Member RoadTire's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NormanF View Post
    A bike shop could install QR if its desired. I agree marketing spin has a lot of fluff and I guess we'll know by the end of the year if this is just a teaser or the company is actually going to sell them off its website.
    But those folks buying this bike aren't going to be the type who understand there is even an option. Remember who we are catering to. Heck, I just figured out how easy it can be.
    FB4K - Free Bikes 4 Kidz. This fall 5000 bikes have been donated and we will have them all set to go by Dec 6. That's 5000 kids getting bicycles for Christmas, just in the Twin Cities.

  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by RoadTire View Post
    But those folks buying this bike aren't going to be the type who understand there is even an option. Remember who we are catering to. Heck, I just figured out how easy it can be.
    Yup. Enthusiasts are not going to be riding this bike. Its aimed at folks who have no technical knowledge of bikes and don't care much about components as long as its ready to ride. In other words, people who buy from a big box store.

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