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Old 09-26-14, 06:30 AM   #1
cycling705
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Hybrid Bike - Wheel Rim Question

Hello everyone.

I've been looking for a hybrid bike so I can get back into riding to lose some weight. I found a great deal locally on Craigslist for a 2010 Fuji Absolute 4.0. I realize it's an entry-level hybrid and the components aren't top of the line, but for the ridiculous low price that's being asked, and my needs, it seems like a no-brainer.

My only question is this: I am 250 lbs and the wheel rims are not double-walled. Is this a deal-breaker?

The stock rims are alloy 36-hole. I'll only be riding neighborhoods and paved bike paths. Assuming I steer clear of holes, would the single-walled rims be OK for the type of riding I'll be doing?

Thanks!
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Old 09-26-14, 07:52 AM   #2
Bill Kapaun
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The quality of the wheel is more in the build then the individual parts.
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Old 09-26-14, 08:14 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by Bill Kapaun View Post
The quality of the wheel is more in the build then the individual parts.
Thank you.

Is it fair to assume that since this bike is the entry-level model for that year that the wheel is fairly "cheap", and I may encounter problems with the single-wall build? Or, are there some decent wheels even on entry-level models?
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Old 09-26-14, 08:26 AM   #4
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A cheap double wall wheel can fail as well as a single wall.
The primary thing is to have the spokes properly tensioned.
That's the MAIN thing necessary for a good wheel.
A "generic" 36 spoke rim should be more than adequate for your weight.
I dropped my 32 spoke Sun Rims M13II into an old fashioned sewer grate with minimal damage.
I weigh about 240 and it bounced my butt 8-10" off the seat. That is a double wall rim, but I feel if the spoke tensions were more typical of factory wheels, i would have had an unrideable wheel. Although it did put a little bit of a "wow" in the wheel, it still didn't rub the brake pads.

Don't let the wheels worry you.
Spend $20 on the rear and have it properly tensioned and you should be fine, unless it has already been severely abused.
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Old 09-26-14, 09:17 AM   #5
cycling705
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Kapaun View Post
A cheap double wall wheel can fail as well as a single wall.
The primary thing is to have the spokes properly tensioned.
That's the MAIN thing necessary for a good wheel.
A "generic" 36 spoke rim should be more than adequate for your weight.
I dropped my 32 spoke Sun Rims M13II into an old fashioned sewer grate with minimal damage.
I weigh about 240 and it bounced my butt 8-10" off the seat. That is a double wall rim, but I feel if the spoke tensions were more typical of factory wheels, i would have had an unrideable wheel. Although it did put a little bit of a "wow" in the wheel, it still didn't rub the brake pads.

Don't let the wheels worry you.
Spend $20 on the rear and have it properly tensioned and you should be fine, unless it has already been severely abused.
Thank you, Bill. If the frame size fits well and I buy it, I'll post a pic here. I appreciate your help!
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Old 09-26-14, 09:28 AM   #6
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If I were you, I'd pick up a pair of larger sized tires. I see the Absolute 4.0 comes with 700x28. I don't know what you consider a deal but here is what bbb says: 2010 Fuji Absolute 4.0 - New and Used Bike Value
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Old 09-27-14, 07:13 PM   #7
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I have a 2010 Fuji Absolute 3.0 and it has been a great bike.
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Old 09-29-14, 08:40 AM   #8
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I went to check out the bike but it was too small. It's unfortunate because it was in near perfect shape. Oh well, back to the drawing board.
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