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Old 08-22-06, 12:00 PM   #1
Madhaitian78
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New member & First-time adult bike rider...need help!

Hello all, I'm from New York and I'm happy to find this website forum because I really need some advice. The last time I went cycling was on a tricycle as a kid. My mom never got me a bicycle because she thought it was unsafe. I really want to learn how to ride a bike for health/weight reasons, but I'm sure it is fun. It really sucks to walk in the park in the summer and everyone else is riding a bike, but me. I'm now 27 and feel like the only person in the world, that can't ride a bike. I am in the process of looking for a good comfort bike. I hear that the flat foot comfort/cruiser bike are good such as the electra townie, but I can't find any at my nearest local bike store. The bikeshop owner told me that the Raleigh Gruv also has that flat foot mechanism like the townie. These flat foot bikes are expensive as well are there any cheap "flat foot" bike around $200 range... Any advice?

Thanks, MH
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Old 08-22-06, 12:54 PM   #2
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Welcome Madhaitian! Not to worry, riding a bike isn't difficult to learn and you can learn on almost any bike. The key is learning to ride first and you can begin learning w/o a bike. The key is learning balance. If you can get your hands on a two-wheeled push scooter like those Razor scooters that were popular a few years ago, get on and push yourself forward. In order to keep from falling off, you'll need to learn which way to lean and steer to stay upright. It's the same motion used for riding a bike. If you can get a friend to loan you a bike, take the pedals off and lower the seat so you can sit w/ your feet flat on the ground. Then push yourself along w/ your feet, picking them up and gliding. Again, you'll learn the balancing motions required for staying upright. Once you can do that, put the pedals back on and start pedaling. You'll be riding in no time. Good luck!
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Old 08-22-06, 01:16 PM   #3
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Dear Mr Madhaitian,

Welcome to the sight. I'm a newbie too. I started out with a $400.00 mountain bike. I didn't really get off the pavement with it. I just got on it and started riding around an empty parking lot. Be sure to wear a helment. Go slow and take you time. You'll get the hang of it in no time. I would purchase a bicycle which will allow you to grow as you riding skill expands. There is nothing worse than spending money on something and regretting you decision later on down the line. I started out with a Research Dynamics Coyote. It was about 10 years old. I started riding on local bicycle trails. After riding about 400 miles, I decided the mountain bike was for the birds and bought a rode bike. I now have a Giant OCR Limited Composite. I'm riding about 80 miles aweek. It's really amazing how you can get "HOOKED".

My advice is to think very carefully about what kind of riding you want to do and then buy a ride that will give you the most flexibility.

Good Luck.

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Old 08-22-06, 03:30 PM   #4
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Get gloves and maybe elbow pads like the roller bladers sometimes use, then it wont hurt as much if you take a few tumbles. When you try pushing along with your feet, try wobbling the handle bars to get the feel of how it makes the bike balance. After you have got the first idea of how to keep yourself balanced, do it on a very gentle down slope.

Once you have learnt to keep yourself moving with the pedals, you will no longer be too concerned about getting your feet flat on the ground. Bikes like the Giant Cypress will give you plenty of scope to enjoy yuor newfound abilities.
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Old 08-22-06, 04:51 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jyossarian
Welcome Madhaitian! Not to worry, riding a bike isn't difficult to learn and you can learn on almost any bike. The key is learning to ride first and you can begin learning w/o a bike. The key is learning balance. If you can get your hands on a two-wheeled push scooter like those Razor scooters that were popular a few years ago, get on and push yourself forward. In order to keep from falling off, you'll need to learn which way to lean and steer to stay upright. It's the same motion used for riding a bike. If you can get a friend to loan you a bike, take the pedals off and lower the seat so you can sit w/ your feet flat on the ground. Then push yourself along w/ your feet, picking them up and gliding. Again, you'll learn the balancing motions required for staying upright. Once you can do that, put the pedals back on and start pedaling. You'll be riding in no time. Good luck!

Poost of the week! Congrats jyos!
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Old 08-22-06, 05:50 PM   #6
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Giant makes a flat foot bike called the "Suede". It retails for $300.
Welcome to the fold.

--A
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Old 08-23-06, 07:36 AM   #7
RonH
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If you want someone to teach you how to ride, try contacting an LCI in your area. Many teach one-on-one classes to folks in your situation.
Here's the website ---> http://www.bikeleague.org/programs/e...e_schedule.php

Good luck.
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