Hi to all -

I'm new to this forum, but have been on the Serotta forum for about two years. Even though I remember reading about cycling when I was a teen (and even sent for a copy of the Palo Alto Cycling catalog back around 1979), I didn't really start riding until I was 34 (in 1993). My first good bike was a Torpado, which I eventually gave to a friend of mine. From there, it was a 1988 (California) Masi 3V, which I sold for $200 (the frameset, not the whole bike) to another friend who had all the components, but no frame, and was also a bit low on funds. I'd have given it to him, but he wouldn't have it.

Right now, I've got 9 fully functional bikes (as opposed to framesets) -

1977 Masi Gran Criterium (the actual frame photographed for the 1978 catalog),
Grandis Overmax Light (possibly the last one imported to the US),
Richard Sachs (road),
Pegoretti Palosanto (with a steel Pegoretti fork, locally painted to match the frame's red lettering),
Colnago Master Piu (looks more like a Master Light to me, but labeled as a Piu),
Masi Pista (possibly brazed by Billato),
Kelly Knobby-X (black - full fenders, electronic 115db horn, plus a wheelset with studded tires - it's my winter bike),
Kelly Bone Stock (orange - with a carbon triple and Record group),
Cannondale R400 (with race blade fenders - it's my rain bike).



I've also got a few frames - Alberto Masi Milano touring 3V, 3Rensho Katana-S, and a Rossin-built Pogliaghi (with a horrible Krylon paint job) that are currently gathering dust. The first two will get sold, if I ever get around to seriously trying to sell them. One of these days I'll throw some sort of group on the Pog and use it for a beater.

I've done nearly all of my own wrenching for the last 8 or 9 years, worked as a volunteer tech on 3 Braking the Cycle tours (to raise funds for HIV/AIDS support services), attended the Park Tools Tech Summit in Philly, taught bicycle maintenance at Recycle-A-Bike in Providence and recently been certified by Shimano to work on electronic Dura Ace (Di2).

On the downside, I don't have a job at the moment. These days, it's not easy for an unemployed 50 year old who's licensed to practice law, but has spent most of his career in health insurance compliance & management. Riding and wrenching keep me from becoming utterly demoralized and discouraged.

Anyway, it's good to be on board.

Regards,
Tom

http://www.brakingthecycle.org/