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  1. #1
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    Combining Transit with Ride-Share

    Here is an idea for combining transit with ride-share: transit companies can offer free passes to passengers in exchange for a certain number of ride-shares (or passenger time) in those passengers' automobiles. Participating passengers use a gps-app so that the system software can offer rides to passengers along the route being driven by the ride-share drivers.

    For drivers: drivers would need to keep the app on for a specified amount of time per month to qualify for the free transit pass. They would not be required to deviate from their route. Ride-hailing passengers would need to select rides at pick-up points (bus stops) along the driver's normal route. Drivers may need to notify the system of their destination if they're making a trip that's not part of a regular commuting pattern.

    For passengers: passengers would be able to enter a destination and would get a list of potentially compatible rides. Some routes may be more helpful than others. It is up to the passenger to decide whether to accept a ride given the amount of walking to and from the route.

    In this way, drivers are encouraged to use public transit by getting free passes, while passengers gain access to more schedule- and routing- flexibility according to the routes being driven by participating drivers. Do you think this is a good/viable idea? Are there aspects you would add? Do you have other ideas for combining transit with ride-sharing that are different than this one?

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    Senior Member wolfchild's Avatar
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    Personally I think that any type of multi-modal commuting, combining different types of transportation on daily basis is a huge PITA... I am also not a big fan of ride sharing, I would much rather prefer to buy my own vehicle and drive myself.

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    Been Around Awhile I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
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    How does the transit company benefit by giving away free passes to non-paying customers?

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    Senior Member Ekdog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
    I would much rather prefer to buy my own vehicle and drive myself.
    Good for you, but some of us like carfree living. That's why we come to this forum, to discuss its ins and outs.

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    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
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    The idea of multi-modal commuting already exists and the cities which offer these options currently use smart cards, but may be considering a change to contactless payment cards/bank cards ... some sooner than others. "Transit passes" are a bit old fashioned now.

    For example:

    In Sydney, you purchase an Opal Card which gives you access to trains, buses, ferries, and light rail.
    Opal cards - Tickets, Opal card and fares - Tickets | transportnsw.info

    London's Oyster Card or Contactless payment card (bank card) allows travel on bus, Tube, tram, DLR, London Overground, TfL Rail, Emirates Air Line, River Bus services and most National Rail services in London
    https://tfl.gov.uk/fares-and-payment...er?intcmp=1683



    There is more of a discussion on this topic in this thread.
    How do you pay for your public transportation?

    There Jrobert73 explains that in Tokyo, their smart card also gives them access to taxis.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jrobert73 View Post
    Here in Tokyo there are various smart cards (IC cards) that can be used for trains, buses, many taxis, convenience stores and many vending machines. These are rechargeable at train stations and possibly convenience stores. You can link it to a credit card or bank account for auto recharge.

    There are apps to link it to certain smartphones, depending on the technology in the phone. Then all you need is the phone for travel and purchases.


    If this idea interests you, I suggest you start researching public transportation systems in large cities around the world ... find out what options actually exist already and what their plans may be for the future. The thread above will give you a place to start your researching because I, and a few others, provided links to the public transportation systems in various large cities.

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    Quote Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike View Post
    How does the transit company benefit by giving away free passes to non-paying customers?
    An expanding customer base means more fares and passes sold. More people want to take carfree trips if they are assured they won't get stranded when buses stop running. You have to look at the reasons people are deterred from using public transit. A big part of it is schedule and routing limitations. Integrating ride-sharing with transit overcomes the problem and expands the ridership (customer base) so the transit company can add routes where ridership patterns are seen to be forming.

    Essentially, incorporating ride-sharing with transit is a recipe for expanding public transit.

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    Been Around Awhile I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tandempower View Post
    An expanding customer base means more fares and passes sold.
    An "expanding customer base" made up of non paying "customers" who are only riding the bus when they earn a free pass may create more crowded buses but no additional revenue for the transit company to expand their services.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tandempower View Post
    An expanding customer base means more fares and passes sold. More people want to take carfree trips if they are assured they won't get stranded when buses stop running. You have to look at the reasons people are deterred from using public transit. A big part of it is schedule and routing limitations. Integrating ride-sharing with transit overcomes the problem and expands the ridership (customer base) so the transit company can add routes where ridership patterns are seen to be forming.

    Essentially, incorporating ride-sharing with transit, is a recipe for expanding public transit.
    Don't fool yourself. A bigger part is laziness and/or racism or not wanting to hang with the common folk.

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    Quote Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike View Post
    An "expanding customer base" made up of non paying "customers" who are only riding the bus when they earn a free pass may create more crowded buses but no additional revenue for the transit company to expand their services.
    The idea is that you offer free transit passes to driving participants in exchange for ride-shares. That means transit customers get access to transfers from transit routes to ride-shares. I.e. you could take a bus and catch a ride from the bus stop to another destination not on a bus stop. Or you could take a bus to go out and catch a ride back after the last bus stops running. This added convenience for passengers should attract more people to use transit because the gaps in transit routes/scheduling will be supplemented with ride-share possibilities.

    "Expanding customer base" means more people will become transit customers if transit is more convenient due to integrated ride-sharing.

    I think you actually get the concept but you just want to say negative things about it, as you do with everything. Don't obfuscate the concept in the process of criticizing it, though, k?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Walter S View Post
    Don't fool yourself. A bigger part is laziness and/or racism or not wanting to hang with the common folk.
    This thread is about an idea for adding ride-sharing within existing transit systems. If you have other ideas about how to do that, post them. Please don't derail the thread.

  11. #11
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tandempower View Post
    This thread is about an idea for adding ride-sharing within existing transit systems. If you have other ideas about how to do that, post them. Please don't derail the thread.
    I posted some info about existing ideas of how to do what you are suggesting.

    Do some research on what currently exists in large cities around the world. Check Tokyo, London, Sydney, Singapore, etc. etc. Maybe some of the things these places are currently doing can be used where you are.


    Quote Originally Posted by Machka View Post
    The idea of multi-modal commuting already exists and the cities which offer these options currently use smart cards, but may be considering a change to contactless payment cards/bank cards ... some sooner than others. "Transit passes" are a bit old fashioned now.

    For example:

    In Sydney, you purchase an Opal Card which gives you access to trains, buses, ferries, and light rail.
    Opal cards - Tickets, Opal card and fares - Tickets | transportnsw.info

    London's Oyster Card or Contactless payment card (bank card) allows travel on bus, Tube, tram, DLR, London Overground, TfL Rail, Emirates Air Line, River Bus services and most National Rail services in London
    https://tfl.gov.uk/fares-and-payment...er?intcmp=1683



    There is more of a discussion on this topic in this thread.
    How do you pay for your public transportation?

    There Jrobert73 explains that in Tokyo, their smart card also gives them access to taxis.


    << see my previous post for the quote >>


    If this idea interests you, I suggest you start researching public transportation systems in large cities around the world ... find out what options actually exist already and what their plans may be for the future. The thread above will give you a place to start your researching because I, and a few others, provided links to the public transportation systems in various large cities.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Machka View Post
    I posted some info about existing ideas of how to do what you are suggesting.

    Do some research on what currently exists in large cities around the world. Check Tokyo, London, Sydney, Singapore, etc. etc. Maybe some of the things these places are currently doing can be used where you are.
    Machka, I don't really like engaging with discussion with you because you structure your thinking in ways that makes it difficult to have simple collaborative discussions about substance. You CAN research "existing ideas" that have been implemented in the kinds of cities you mention or elsewhere BUT it is only a source of ideas. There's no need to push the point of using these cities or others as an example because ANY source of ideas can be used to contribute to the discussion, even something you just think of on your own. It waters down threads to hijack substantial discussion with discussion about HOW to discuss the topic. That's why I say posters should post their ideas if they have any and otherwise leave the discussion to others who do.

  13. #13
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tandempower View Post
    Machka, I don't really like engaging with discussion with you because you structure your thinking in ways that makes it difficult to have simple collaborative discussions about substance. You CAN research "existing ideas" that have been implemented in the kinds of cities you mention or elsewhere BUT it is only a source of ideas. There's no need to push the point of using these cities or others as an example because ANY source of ideas can be used to contribute to the discussion, even something you just think of on your own. It waters down threads to hijack substantial discussion with discussion about HOW to discuss the topic. That's why I say posters should post their ideas if they have any and otherwise leave the discussion to others who do.
    Researching what currently exists in various locations is an excellent starting place for a discussion.

    As I've mentioned, many places currently use smart cards which allow them access to various methods of transportation, including taxis in some places.

    Other places are starting to use bank cards and phone apps to pay for public transportation.


    How about looking at those places and determining the pros and cons of what they are doing.

    You might start by focusing on Tokyo. How does Tokyo incorporate taxis into their public transportation system. Is it just certain taxi companies, or all of them? How do the drivers get paid? How is vehicle maintenance handled?

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    Quote Originally Posted by tandempower View Post
    Here is an idea for combining transit with ride-share: transit companies can offer free passes to passengers in exchange for a certain number of ride-shares (or passenger time) in those passengers' automobiles. Participating passengers use a gps-app so that the system software can offer rides to passengers along the route being driven by the ride-share drivers.

    For drivers: drivers would need to keep the app on for a specified amount of time per month to qualify for the free transit pass. They would not be required to deviate from their route. Ride-hailing passengers would need to select rides at pick-up points (bus stops) along the driver's normal route. Drivers may need to notify the system of their destination if they're making a trip that's not part of a regular commuting pattern.

    For passengers: passengers would be able to enter a destination and would get a list of potentially compatible rides. Some routes may be more helpful than others. It is up to the passenger to decide whether to accept a ride given the amount of walking to and from the route.

    In this way, drivers are encouraged to use public transit by getting free passes, while passengers gain access to more schedule- and routing- flexibility according to the routes being driven by participating drivers. Do you think this is a good/viable idea? Are there aspects you would add? Do you have other ideas for combining transit with ride-sharing that are different than this one?
    Here's the problem.

    I don't know if Ride Share services like Uber can work in conjunction with transit since there might not be enough drivers available during rush hour. You need many Uber cars on the street to service a railroad stop.

    I like the fact that Uber is thinking of supporting transit by offering a service follows a bus line route and only costs $5.00 dollars. Uber can can pick up as many passengers but this service will only be profitable if the vehicle is a jitney van.
    Last edited by Dahon.Steve; 02-07-16 at 11:17 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dahon.Steve View Post
    Here's the problem.

    I don't know if Ride Share services like Uber can work in conjunction with transit since there might not be enough drivers available during rush hour. You need many Uber cars on the street to service a railroad stop.
    Who said anything about Uber/Lyft/etc.? I was thinking more about the transit company using its own routing app, or an open-source app, to manage the routing. I agree that it may not be 'enough' but you have to start somewhere. If drivers are willing to accept a certain number of rides in exchange for a free transit pass, you've killed two birds with one stone: 1) getting drivers to take transit more & 2) providing more options for LCF people who use transit.

    I like the fact that Uber is thinking of supporting transit by offering a service follows a bus line route and only costs $5.00 dollars. The Uber can can pick up as many passengers but this service will only be profitable if the car was a jitney van.
    I think it would be best to have a system where drivers can have their regular routes available for rides without deviating to pick up and drop off passengers. Then the passenger is responsible for deciding whether a given ride is helpful, even though they still may need to walk and/or catch additional/multiple rides to accomplish their trip.

    Drivers are using ride-share apps to make money, but doing so requires catering more to passengers than just picking them up for a certain portion of your own intended trip. By integrating with the transit system, you are getting to drive less by having a free transit pass but then when you do drive, you just have to pick up people along the route you're traveling anyway. I think it's a pretty good trade; mutually beneficial for drivers and transit passengers alike.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Machka View Post
    Researching what currently exists in various locations is an excellent starting place for a discussion.

    As I've mentioned, many places currently use smart cards which allow them access to various methods of transportation, including taxis in some places.

    Other places are starting to use bank cards and phone apps to pay for public transportation.


    How about looking at those places and determining the pros and cons of what they are doing.

    You might start by focusing on Tokyo. How does Tokyo incorporate taxis into their public transportation system. Is it just certain taxi companies, or all of them? How do the drivers get paid? How is vehicle maintenance handled?
    If you wanted to research Tokyo or any other transit system and use your research as a source to contribute to this thread, that would be fine. What I don't understand is why you post on threads for the sake of telling others how to approach the thread. Are you just making suggestions to help get the thread going or are you implying that discussion should be avoided except after researching these existing systems you are talking about?

    Also, you keep talking about payment systems, etc. but do you realize the problem for many transit systems is that they reduce service citing budget shortfalls as an issue? Basically, taxpayers and local governments hold these public transit services hostage in an effort to insist on more funding.

    This is a catch-22, because obviously people spend more on driving than on public transit so increasing tax revenues involves increasing automotive expenditures, which reduces demand for transit. So an effective integration of public transit with private driving would involve a direct trade/barter where drivers get a free transit pass in exchange for sharing rides with transit passengers when they drive. In this way, drivers spend less on driving bc they can use transit for free, and transit passengers get better service; and it all saves money instead of costing more, which undermines the catch-22 where transit is cut to demand more funds.
    Last edited by tandempower; 02-07-16 at 11:20 AM.

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