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Living Car Free Do you live car free or car light? Do you prefer to use alternative transportation (bicycles, walking, other human-powered or public transportation) for everyday activities whenever possible? Discuss your lifestyle here.

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Old 08-29-17, 03:15 PM   #1
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Rain

All day. I always love when the weather starts to get nicer it also starts to get wetter.
It has been rather dry for the last two weeks. Two rainy Tuesdays.
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Old 08-29-17, 03:31 PM   #2
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Funny I happened upon this. We've been three inches below norm since June 1 ( my apologies to all Houstonians ) but today ran into a good T-storm with about 2-3 miles to go. Quickly realized how cold rain is at 65F hitting you at 23 mph (down hill ). Finally made it, first thought was a hot cup of coffee. Getting to be the time of year when I need pack some rain protection along I guess.
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Old 08-29-17, 03:43 PM   #3
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Used to like riding in the rain when I lived in a house with a backyard & garage.
Now living in a NYC apartment & using the tub to wash my bike(s) - not too much.
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Old 08-29-17, 10:54 PM   #4
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I sure wish it would rain here. Oregon doesn't fight forest fires, it just waits for them to go out when the Fall rains come (ditto for the USFS in Oregon). We've got hundreds of square miles in flames at the moment and our air quality is slightly below that found in the average incinerator. Seriously, the sun hasn't been visible behind the smoke for three days.

Thankfully, there are no fires to the west or northwest, and that's where the winds are coming from tonight. Maybe we can ride a bit tomorrow without hacking up a black lung.

I sure miss the pre-climate change era when we only had a six-week dry season, which meant a two week fire season since it took a while for the forest debris to dry out once the rain stopped. This twenty week dry season is going to require some investment in fire fighting that we just don't seem inclined to make. On the bright side, a few more years of this and there won't be much left to burn.
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Old 08-29-17, 11:00 PM   #5
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I sure wish it would rain here. Oregon doesn't fight forest fires, it just waits for them to go out when the Fall rains come (ditto for the USFS in Oregon).
I did not know that. I was just driving through a few days ago and the smell of smoke was pervasive. I don't even know where the fires were, but there was smoke in the air everywhere. I'm still coughing.
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Old 08-29-17, 11:55 PM   #6
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I'll take rain over hot and humid any day, but I'm still not a fan. I miss the high plains!
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Old 08-30-17, 06:02 AM   #7
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I'll take rain over hot and humid any day, but I'm still not a fan. I miss the high plains!
Well, as we are seeing on live TV, there can be too much of a not as bad thing!
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Old 08-30-17, 10:35 AM   #8
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Well, as we are seeing on live TV, there can be too much of a not as bad thing!
Absolutely - it is horrifying.

When I lived on the Gulf Coast, we would sometimes get 8-10" of rain in a day. No big deal: the ground could easily absorb that much, which was kind of amazing. One day we got 14", and everyone made fun of me for calling in to work. My whole street was flooded out (though the house, on stilts or whatever they call it, was fine) and I had no idea how to get out of my neighborhood without floating away.

Seeing what can happen, I feel like I dodged a bullet. On the topic of LCF: that was one place where I felt it would not be prudent to go without an available vehicle - both for the dangerous heat days and the threat of mandatory evacuations during hurricane season.
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Old 08-30-17, 12:03 PM   #9
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Absolutely - it is horrifying.

When I lived on the Gulf Coast, we would sometimes get 8-10" of rain in a day. No big deal: the ground could easily absorb that much, which was kind of amazing. One day we got 14", and everyone made fun of me for calling in to work. My whole street was flooded out (though the house, on stilts or whatever they call it, was fine) and I had no idea how to get out of my neighborhood without floating away.

Seeing what can happen, I feel like I dodged a bullet. On the topic of LCF: that was one place where I felt it would not be prudent to go without an available vehicle - both for the dangerous heat days and the threat of mandatory evacuations during hurricane season.
This also hearkens back to a debate we had about disasters a year or two ago. Car evacuations are dicey because the roads can't handle the massive traffic, and I think major population centres and some isolated locations should also have a rail evacuation contingency to supplement private vehicles. It would have been ideal for New Orleans. People could be dropped off at multiple cities with shelters all along the tracks, or worst case scenario, stay on the train.

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Old 08-30-17, 01:13 PM   #10
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Used to like riding in the rain when I lived in a house with a backyard & garage.
Now living in a NYC apartment & using the tub to wash my bike(s) - not too much.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7jf...IoDLA&index=66
I take my bike to the roof with dish washing soap and a bucket of water, and spritz it down with a hand pump bug sprayer. Though these days I wash my bike pretty much never.

I ride in the rain, but it makes me nervous. I did it last night after dark. Between visibility (dark, and I wear glasses), and crappy roads full of pot holes, and metal plates that I've skidded out on, I rather not, though it doesn't stop me. It's still better, and faster, than the alternative.
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Old 08-30-17, 02:39 PM   #11
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Its Fire Season in Cascadia, the rains are needed to put the forest fires out.
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Old 08-30-17, 04:51 PM   #12
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Its Fire Season in Cascadia, the rains are needed to put the forest fires out.
I don't tend to ride in the rain. My response is normally I can ride tomorrow or at the most the day after. There is no reason I can think of to get cold and wet. But Fires have often concerned me. When I lived in a mountain community I was evacuated three times in about 11 years. Once at night when the police had to drive through the streets with loud speakers yelling at us to leave. All three times it was by car or truck. I really don't know how the car free got out. The small mass transit service stopped working well before the mass evacuation. There was no rail service in the mountains and there hasn't been for years.

Now my nieces live in Oregon and have mentioned the smell of smoke now and then in e-mails.
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Old 08-30-17, 07:04 PM   #13
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I'm looking out the window and watching the rain right now. Luckily I put in a long ride yesterday, and can get away with not riding today (though I hope things clear up by tomorrow).

Personally, I almost never ride out into the rain. But I am often caught by the rain when out on a long right. High heat and humidity in the morning often results in thunderstorms in the afternoon.

I've got a cross-country ride coming up soon, and I will have to ride a certain distance every day, regardless of the weather. I've ordered some good rain gear, and I hope it does the job.
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Old 08-30-17, 10:55 PM   #14
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I did not know that. I was just driving through a few days ago and the smell of smoke was pervasive. I don't even know where the fires were, but there was smoke in the air everywhere. I'm still coughing.
200 square miles torched in one fire near the coast on the south side of the state and another 200 square miles spread about elsewhere. Several small fires near Ashland have caused cancellation of the outdoor performances at the Shakespeare Festival. Several fires from Sisters to near Eugene and I don't know where else are still uncontained. Even friends in Portland are waking up to ash on their vehicles. I was on the train a week ago and it was pretty bad both at the OR/CA border and then north of Klamath Falls.

I do wish those folks down along the Gulf would share just a wee bit of their rain. We'd gladly take a foot or so if that would help. Actually, with the way it's going, we'll get some Fall downpours that will involve mudslides where the hills have been denuded by the summer conflagrations.
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Old 09-01-17, 01:02 PM   #15
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This also hearkens back to a debate we had about disasters a year or two ago. Car evacuations are dicey because the roads can't handle the massive traffic, and I think major population centres and some isolated locations should also have a rail evacuation contingency to supplement private vehicles. It would have been ideal for New Orleans. People could be dropped off at multiple cities with shelters all along the tracks, or worst case scenario, stay on the train.
If narrower, multistory homes were prevalent instead of single-story housing, people could just go upstairs when it floods. Houses should have emergence water filters built into them like fire-extinguishers so they can filter and test flood water before drinking it. Some contaminants are difficult to filter out, but I think a combination of filters, including charcoal for chemicals, micropores for biologicals, etc. could be developed and installed standard so that everyone didn't have to resort to buying bottled water during a flood.
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Old 09-01-17, 03:17 PM   #16
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If narrower, multistory homes were prevalent instead of single-story housing, people could just go upstairs when it floods. Houses should have emergence water filters built into them like fire-extinguishers so they can filter and test flood water before drinking it. Some contaminants are difficult to filter out, but I think a combination of filters, including charcoal for chemicals, micropores for biologicals, etc. could be developed and installed standard so that everyone didn't have to resort to buying bottled water during a flood.
As prev discussed houses can be elevated on stilts or simply have a higher main floor in flood prone areas, although it means years of having to climb extra stairs. Probably it would make more sense for people to have stockpiles of water than a water purifier. I don't drink bottled water so I don't know what the shelf life is, however. In parts of Canada it would make more sense for houses or even a block of houses to have back up systems for power rather than water.

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Old 09-01-17, 04:39 PM   #17
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I sure wish it would rain here. Oregon doesn't fight forest fires, it just waits for them to go out when the Fall rains come (ditto for the USFS in Oregon).
You do the many brave men (and women) in the Fire Service a great disrespect in characterizing their efforts so baldly. It is no more possible to contain a megafire than it is to contain a river in a one in 10,000 year rainfall.
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Old 09-01-17, 04:47 PM   #18
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If narrower, multistory homes were prevalent instead of single-story housing, people could just go upstairs when it floods. Houses should have emergence water filters built into them like fire-extinguishers so they can filter and test flood water before drinking it. Some contaminants are difficult to filter out, but I think a combination of filters, including charcoal for chemicals, micropores for biologicals, etc. could be developed and installed standard so that everyone didn't have to resort to buying bottled water during a flood.
Some people did exactly that. Are doing exactly that. So you are in your three story house. The first two floors are flooded under 15' of standing water. How long do you think you can wait? Two days? Three? Four? Some parts of Houston have been submerged for six days and counting. And what happens when the chemical plant a half mile away goes critical? Some people have amazing imaginations...
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Old 09-01-17, 06:23 PM   #19
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enjoyed that. maybe you want to stay further away from those buses? there were a cpl other squish points that made me squint. got fenders?
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Old 09-01-17, 06:32 PM   #20
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As prev discussed houses can be elevated on stilts or simply have a higher main floor in flood prone areas, although it means years of having to climb extra stairs. Probably it would make more sense for people to have stockpiles of water than a water purifier. I don't drink bottled water so I don't know what the shelf life is, however. In parts of Canada it would make more sense for houses or even a block of houses to have back up systems for power rather than water.
Longer than your own.
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Old 09-01-17, 07:10 PM   #21
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You do the many brave men (and women) in the Fire Service a great disrespect in characterizing their efforts so baldly. It is no more possible to contain a megafire than it is to contain a river in a one in 10,000 year rainfall.
The biggest fire currently burning in Oregon, going on 300 square miles, was initially responded to by fire fighters when it was one-quarter acre. Rather than put it out, they chose to leave it burning in hopes that it would just burn out. That was a very poor decision and would have been poor if it was made in September, but it was made in early August with two full months of fire season in front of us.

Sadly, that decision is typical of what we see here. Absolutely I feel that many of the under-manned fire fighters on the ground behave bravely and work harder than is reasonable under horrific conditions (been there, done that). However, they too are forced to deal with poor command decisions and poor allocation of funding. We can and should do better, and making fire fighting some sort of sacred cow isn't going to improve the way we deal with fires.

Oh, by the way, we've had a few criminal convictions of people who were employed as forest fire fighters for arson. They wanted to increase their overtime pay. Not everyone who chooses to fight fires is a hero, though some certainly are.
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Old 09-01-17, 11:11 PM   #22
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Longer than your own.
In what kind of container?
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Old 09-01-17, 11:32 PM   #23
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The biggest fire currently burning in Oregon, going on 300 square miles, was initially responded to by fire fighters when it was one-quarter acre. Rather than put it out, they chose to leave it burning in hopes that it would just burn out. That was a very poor decision and would have been poor if it was made in September, but it was made in early August with two full months of fire season in front of us.

Sadly, that decision is typical of what we see here. Absolutely I feel that many of the under-manned fire fighters on the ground behave bravely and work harder than is reasonable under horrific conditions (been there, done that). However, they too are forced to deal with poor command decisions and poor allocation of funding. We can and should do better, and making fire fighting some sort of sacred cow isn't going to improve the way we deal with fires.

Oh, by the way, we've had a few criminal convictions of people who were employed as forest fire fighters for arson. They wanted to increase their overtime pay. Not everyone who chooses to fight fires is a hero, though some certainly are.
You do know there are some environmentalists that have been saying let it burn for years? Better for the forest and the earth they say. I don't agree but then that may just be me.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/06/s...s.html?mcubz=1
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Old 09-02-17, 08:10 AM   #24
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In what kind of container?
Plastic, glass, some metals. Anything relatively inert will keep water virtually forever.

You can do it wrong though. It needs to be clean water in a clean container. http://www.bottledwater.org/educatio...-water-storage

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Old 09-02-17, 10:29 AM   #25
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You do know there are some environmentalists that have been saying let it burn for years? Better for the forest and the earth they say. I don't agree but then that may just be me.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/06/s...s.html?mcubz=1
The main counterargument is that there are people and homes in some fire-prone areas, but where there aren't, what would be your objection?
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