Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 23 of 23

Thread: where to live

  1. #1
    Senior Member cosmo starr's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Dallas
    Posts
    498
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    where to live

    i know this topic has been beat in other forums but is most relevant here
    in a year or two ill be out of college and can move anywhere and do anything
    what are some areas to look at

  2. #2
    Guest
    Guest
    Well, pick a place (for riding) that has hills and flat roads. Try for a climate that has mild winters. Look for a place with good public transportation.

    Places mentioned on the forums before:

    Seattle
    San Diego
    San Francisco
    Portland
    Denver
    Virginia/DC/Maryland
    Hawaii

    Some of those cities also have carsharing programs (www.flexcar.com). So if you need a car for a couple of hours, you've got the opportunity to rent by the hour.

    Personally, I love where I've moved to now- I'm out in Arlington, VA. The hills are tough. Some rolling hills are harder than others, but there's no shortage of challenge. The public transportation is pretty decent. They have a very good bike transportation system. Flexcar is here (they're transferring my account from Chicago). The weather is mild (I rode year round in Chicago). I'm good.

    Koffee

  3. #3
    Senior Member stokell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    On the Road
    My Bikes
    Custom built tourer, custom electric bike, beaters everywhere
    Posts
    1,260
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    When I became car free some 15 years ago, it really changed my lifestyle. I was just out of college and unemployed at the time.

    Since I own a house and have a family, I couldn't start over anywhere so I started by getting a map of the city and drawing a 10km circle around my house. I would look for work in an area that I could bike to. Unfortunately I live on the shores of Lake Ontario, so most of the circle was in water. The rest of it was however in downtown Toronto.

    I travelled 8 km to my first job. 12 to my next. Now I'm travelling 18 km each way. I have 2 beater bikes tied up near subway stations. If the weather isn't great I ride to one station, and pick up the other bike from another. I still ride about 16km return trip. Last winter I only lost 6 days.

    This does not necessarily answer your question, but it illustrates how you can be car free even in a northern climate.

  4. #4
    Senior Member AlanK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Seattle, WA (United States)
    Posts
    482
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Here's a link to bicycling magazine's report of the best cities for bicycles (it's a few years old now, but probably still valid):
    http://www.bicyclinginfo.org/de/friendly.htm

    As someone who's been to Portland a few times, I will tell you that it's rank as #1 is richly deserved. They have bike lanes everywhere and downtown is designed to be pedestrian and bike friendly. They also have a great light rail system. The only bad thing is the weather.

    Seattle is also a very good bike city. A decent number of bike lanes and all the buses have bike racks. The public transit is good, but most of the time bicycling is more efficient if you live in city.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    New Orleans
    My Bikes
    Trek T80, Trek SU200, Trek SU100, Giant Bowery
    Posts
    250
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    New Orleans is a fine place. It's small enough that you can cycle anywhere in the city within a reasonable amount of time, plus winter temperatures rarely drop below the upper thirties. Not to mention there's an abundance of booze.

  6. #6
    gwd
    gwd is offline
    Biker gwd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    DC
    My Bikes
    one Recumbent and one Utility Bike
    Posts
    1,917
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by cosmo starr
    i know this topic has been beat in other forums but is most relevant here
    in a year or two ill be out of college and can move anywhere and do anything
    what are some areas to look at
    Amsterdam in the Netherlands used to be a very bikeable place. If you can live anywhere go check it
    out. Even if you can't live there it is worth seeing what is possible. I spent a week there one March about 14 years ago. Has anyone been there recently? The train station had bike rentals. The bike lanes had
    signage for distant cities. The woman at the hotel said the signage was no joke "You can travel to anywhere in the Netherlands by bike." DC doesn't even have a decent bike route to Baltimore.

  7. #7
    gwd
    gwd is offline
    Biker gwd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    DC
    My Bikes
    one Recumbent and one Utility Bike
    Posts
    1,917
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by koffee brown
    Well, pick a place (for riding) that has hills and flat roads. Try for a climate that has mild winters. Look for a place with good public transportation.


    Personally, I love where I've moved to now- I'm out in Arlington, VA. The hills are tough. Some rolling hills are harder than others, but there's no shortage of challenge. The public transportation is pretty decent. They have a very good bike transportation system. Flexcar is here (they're transferring my account from Chicago). The weather is mild (I rode year round in Chicago). I'm good.

    Koffee
    Koffee, are you really suggesting to look for hils? One thing that annoys me about Arlington is that they
    design hills into their bike lanes. I have the impression that they do it out of spite toward cyclists. Look at the Martha Custis trail and compare the trail slopes with those on the adjacent road. Look at those bike bridges at the airport- grrrr. I spoke with the engineer who designed those bridges at the airport and he told me the goal was not to facilitate cycling, he said it was to minimize disruption to car traffic. They could've put the cars over the bikes since bikes require less overhead. When I've got a big load to carry the manmade hills of Arlington bug me. Arlington tries but VDOT seems to always get its way.

  8. #8
    Guest
    Guest
    I'm from Chicago, which is flat as a pancake. Moving to Arlington was great- flat roads get boring after a while. With no shortage of hills, I never will have any boredom with riding.

    I guess if you lived in a flat area with no challenge, you'd see where I was coming from. :-/

    I like Custis. That Custis loop is part of my staple cycling experience. It's fun.

    Koffee

  9. #9
    Sophomoric Member Roody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Dancing in Lansing
    Posts
    20,369
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm not trying to be cute, but I think almost any area is good for cycling. One of the great things about a bike is that you get off the beaten path and see some of the true character of a region. I live in Lansing, MI, which would not be considered a scenic hot spot. Nevertheless, I can easily ride through old growth forest, past two lakes and trhee different rivers, past the capitol of Michigan and one of the largest auto assembly plants in the world--all in less than one hour on my way to work. Most carbound residents of Lansing know nothing about these places. And you can find similar unique places almost anywhere you find yourself!

    The other things that people mentioned--being close to work, stores, entertainment, mass transit--are qualities you can find in many cities. Another possibility is to live carfreee in the country, and there is a recent thread on that topic here.

  10. #10
    .
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    .
    My Bikes
    .
    Posts
    3,094
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hawaii is not to be taken on unless you've researched it into the ground and you're sure to keep enough $$ on hand to escape, because you'll become desperate to do so.

    I'd definately do Europe if I could, if I were you!

  11. #11
    gwd
    gwd is offline
    Biker gwd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    DC
    My Bikes
    one Recumbent and one Utility Bike
    Posts
    1,917
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by koffee brown
    I'm from Chicago, which is flat as a pancake. Moving to Arlington was great- flat roads get boring after a while. With no shortage of hills, I never will have any boredom with riding.

    I guess if you lived in a flat area with no challenge, you'd see where I was coming from. :-/

    I like Custis. That Custis loop is part of my staple cycling experience. It's fun.

    Koffee
    Gee, I learned cycling in Hawaii and Florida. Florida is also flat but I am completely different... hills still bug me, and hills without reason like the ones on the custis trail bug me more. I know, my bike monster friends tell me "Find the most difficult hill and do it over and over again until you can do hills." They call it doing hill repeats. So, to stay on topic here, how about Phiiadelphia? The time I visited with my bike was over a three day weekend about 1999 or 2000. When I rolled my bike out of the train station I worried that it would be suicidal but there was a big "Share the Road" sign. It looked like the street department had gotten the bike/ped religion. Is it still like that? The people at the motel let me keep my bike in the room. There were bike lanes all over downtown. Good signage. For people like Koffee a bike ride to the suburb of Manyunk ( did I spell it right?) gives you a nice hill to climb. My legs were burning after racing a woman to the top of this street the locals call "The Wall". The car drivers were still agressive toward me but all the bike lanes and signage made me feel welcome. I'd be interested to read how Philadelphia natives view the bike transportation conditions in their city. I may
    return someday, I think Ben Franklin would have been a biker if he hadn't been born 100 years too soon.

  12. #12
    Guest
    Guest
    Don't get me wrong- hills kick my butt, and I curse them everytime I have to climb. I've been out with some forum members, and I think they are half amused and half exasperated by my constant complaints every time we hit a hill. My legs hurt. I'm doing a light week after several heavy weeks of hills with lots and lots of hill repeats. BUT I know that challenge is good- and living in a flat area is great for commuting and all, but if you want different types of terrain and more challenge in your rides, a flat city won't get you that. I can avoid the hills or I can meet them head on by varying my route. That's what I'm concerned with when I do my riding.

    I guess before we make recommendations, we should be asking- what's the criteria for the type of cycling you are looking to do, and when you're looking for places to go where you can ride your bike, is it for commuting or training, or what?

    Koffee

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Cherry Hill,NJ
    Posts
    1,127
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by gwd
    I'd be interested to read how Philadelphia natives view the bike transportation conditions in their city. I may return someday
    I live in Jersey and work in Philly. I'd say that the bike transportation conditions that you experienced are still the status quo. Lots of bicycle activity in and around center city. There is a bike path that runs from the art museum to Valley Forge, about 22 miles. Bicycles can be ridden over the Ben Franklin Bridge using the pedestrian walkways (south walkway currently closed for bridge painting).

    The area doesn't have DC's network of bike trails, but public transport from NJ allows bicycles. The Patco High Speed Line from Lindenwold NJ to Philly, allows bicycles without restrictions. NJ transit buses are all equipped with racks. South Jersey, once out of Camden is one of most bike friendly areas anyone could find. Lots of small towns with complete rosters of stores. Most roads and highways have shoulders wide enough to safely bike. I can ride my bike from my front door to the Jersey shore at Cape May, 75 miles away, and use secondary roads with decent shoulders almost the entire way. Long Beach island, 50 miles away is a straight shot on well shouldered roads the entire distance. And it's flat! There are alternative routes that can get you to most places, so avoiding the high speed traffic is usually possible. The Pinelands National Reserve is located about 20 miles east of Philly, takes up 1/3 of the state's land area and stretches almost all the way to the ocean. So even though NJ is a densly populated state it has some very rural riding. Same goes for Salem and Cumberland counties, about 40 miles south of Philly. That area, topography wise, is very similar to Maryland's eastern shore

    A guy in my office just started commuting by bike last week. His house is about 4 miles east of mine in Marlton NJ. Some days he rides all the way to the office at 19th and Market, other days he rides to the High Speed line and takes the train across the river. My house is about 12 miles door to door from the office. Either way, my hat's off to him.
    I'm just trying to be the person my dog thinks I am.

  14. #14
    '05 NUEser EJ123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    3,374
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    lol i was gunno say dallas, but then it said you were in dallas. haha i got my bike in dallas, what shop did you get ur bike cosmo starr??

  15. #15
    Senior Member cosmo starr's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Dallas
    Posts
    498
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by EJ123
    lol i was gunno say dallas, but then it said you were in dallas. haha i got my bike in dallas, what shop did you get ur bike cosmo starr??
    i got the fisher at richardson bike mart, the trek at bluebonnet in lewisville...id rather not deal with rbm ...as far as living, i was thinking about finding a place closer to downtown but a change of scenery might be fun

  16. #16
    '05 NUEser EJ123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    3,374
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    o i went to richardson bike mart the other day for the first time to get a co2 pump and dang that place is huge! I got my bike at bicycles plus at sniders plaza but have you ever gone to grapevine/colleyville/southlake..its cool over there

  17. #17
    Senior Member cosmo starr's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Dallas
    Posts
    498
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by EJ123
    o i went to richardson bike mart the other day for the first time to get a co2 pump and dang that place is huge! I got my bike at bicycles plus at sniders plaza but have you ever gone to grapevine/colleyville/southlake..its cool over there
    ive been everywhere....i used to ride the mtb alot when i could afford to drive

  18. #18
    '05 NUEser EJ123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    3,374
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    what college do you go to?

  19. #19
    18 dog baby
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Honolulu
    My Bikes
    2008 crosscheck complete, 1984 Pugeot fixed conversion
    Posts
    400
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well, Honolulu is okay. The weather is perfect like 10 months of the time. But the roads are absolutely crap, for now. It might get a little bit better. But shipping on bike parts is seriously expensive.
    Outside of urban Honolulu, like on any other island or any other part of the island, you're miles and miles away from anywhere you have to be for work.
    I'd also have to mention that you should learn about the history here before comming. You might feel a bit guilty living here.
    mah-ha

  20. #20
    .
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    .
    My Bikes
    .
    Posts
    3,094
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yeah or get killed.

    Don't move to Hawaii unless you're looking at moving to Maui or Kaneohe on Oahu. Better yet, just don't. There are too many other places that are argueably just as nice and WAY cheaper.

  21. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    6,126
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you're moving to a cold climate, I would look at the transportation system and shopping district as essential to becoming car free.

    I'm in the northern NJ area and it's basically flat with some areas that have hills. With good commuter rail lines, I can get to the hills and back in a single day. In fact, I often head out to the hills by train and come back by bicycle. Unfortunately, most states don't have commuter rail lines but lightrail is catching on an cities are building them. If I was looking for a place to live, a lightrail line would be a huge incentive for me to move there. www.lightrailnow.com

  22. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    96
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Car free?
    If you donīt mind crossing the Atlantic.
    Barcelona.
    Almost perfect mediterranean weather.
    (But if you like winter sports, the Pirineos are just an hour and a half away.)

    You can ride from one corner to the other in the city in less than 45 minutes just cruising. Itīs very biking friendly place, and pretty flat, allthough if you want, you can find nice hills.
    You will see a lot of cyclist all around.
    Public transportation is very good, and accesible from almost anywhere.
    And anywhere you are, you are in walking distance from anything you might need.
    Almost forgot, taxis fares are reasonable fair.

    The cultural lifestyle is very "global" so you pretty much can find people and things from all over the world.
    Thereīs plenty to do, and you do not need a car to do it.
    As a matter of fact, unless you live out of town, getting a car is the worst choice you can make. Thatīs why this is one of the cities in the world that has the highest rate of scooter and motorcycle riders, and with gas prices you can actually see more cyclists everyday.

    The only point that doesnīt make this the perfect city for me, is that rooms or flats can get pretty expensive in relation to wages. But I think this is true in almost every big city in the world.

    I have been living car and stress free for the last 5 years.
    If not to live, Iīd still advice on coming here for a nice vacation.

  23. #23
    '05 NUEser EJ123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    3,374
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Do you want a big city like new york or little like amarillo or small like 400 ppl

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •