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  1. #1
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    Bring rackpacks in grocery store?

    Do you folks bring your rackpacks in the store, hook them to the grocery cart and then at the checkout load the groceries directly inside, or do you just leave your rackpacks on your bike and then use the normal paper or plastic bags and then load them outside?

    I've been bringing my Ortliebs in the store, but they seem to get in the way and checkout is a little chaotic (trying to balance the load). I'm considering buying 4 reuseable cloth bags and then loading them outside.

  2. #2
    I'm made of earth! becnal's Avatar
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    Here in Germany, everyone uses reuseable cloth bags. It is much easier to just walk out with them and stick them into the panniers. I recommend going that route.

  3. #3
    move along seasponge's Avatar
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    i have the same problem as you...the cashier runs all my stuff over the scanner, i pay, tell them i don't need a bag, then rush to to pack everything in my bag and i can never do a good job packing because the next person in line's stuff starts coming.

  4. #4
    totally louche Bekologist's Avatar
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    canvas bags inside, panniers outside is smooth operating.

    My grocery bike has baskets so its canvas bags inside anyway.

    for just a few groceries on the way home, i'll bring a pannier in.

  5. #5
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    I bring my panniers in the store and then only pack once. It took a little while to get the loads equal, but I can get close enough now that it doesn't bother me. I start packing when the first item is scanned and stay until I am done. I was a grocey bagger in high school, so maybe I do have an unfair advantage .

  6. #6
    Senior Member Ziemas's Avatar
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    We always take our panniers into the store. It's much easier that way, no loading and unloading plastic bags that will be thrown out when we get home.

  7. #7
    Chicago Cyclist ViciousCycle's Avatar
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    I consider my Ortlieb bags too valuable to leave outside on my bike. I have seen people run a cable lock through the smaller loop on their Ortlieb bag, but I find it simpler and more secure just to bring the bags inside with me always.

  8. #8
    Cheesmonger Extraordinair natelutkjohn's Avatar
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    I just have them put it all back into the cart, no bags, then take the cart outside to my bicycle to load it up. Seems to work fine and no rushing to load either.

  9. #9
    Macaws Rock! michaelnel's Avatar
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    I bring my Ortliebs in and put them in the cart along with my helmet, gloves, and glasses. I do my shopping, pay, then take all the stuff back outside and load the panniers.
    ---

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  10. #10
    Fatties Fit Fine carless's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by natelutkjohn
    I just have them put it all back into the cart, no bags, then take the cart outside to my bicycle to load it up. Seems to work fine and no rushing to load either.
    Roger that, "I brought my own" works great and makes the checkout person do a mental hiccup. Whole foods gives you a nickel.
    California sustainability: 200 cars and 1 bike in the front of the natural food chain store on a spare-the air-day.
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  11. #11
    Sophomoric Member Roody's Avatar
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    If I want bags, I let 'em bag 'em. If I don't need the bags, I say, "No bag please."

    I pack stuff in my backpack (I don't use panniers) in the alcove where the carts are stored, if there is one. I try to get out of the way, becaus it does take a minute to stow stuff properly to my specifications.


    "Think Outside the Cage"

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by becnal
    Here in Germany, everyone uses reuseable cloth bags. It is much easier to just walk out with them and stick them into the panniers. I recommend going that route.
    Yep I discovered that in Germany, you pay a dime or so for a plastic bag if you need one, and you end up feeling like a real fool, or an ******* American(tm) if you show up for a bit of shopping without your handy shopping bag like the locals have.

  13. #13
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    This is off topic, but, I find it interesting how many of us car-free or bike commuting fans have lived in Germany (5 years myself). Could it be that this culture planted some habits that we didn't want to forego for those who've returned to the states?

    Lots of good ideas here; I think ill try the cloth bags next because it seems like it would be quicker than loading items one at a time outside. Plus since the bagger's salary is included with the price of the goods, why not let them help out? Plus it might inspire a paper or plastic person behind me in line to go cloth too.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Brian's Avatar
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    We have to pay for plastic bags at some stores here, and they're being outlawed completely by 2008. Nearly every store here sells a reusable pannier-sized bag for a buck.

  15. #15
    I bet
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    I have one of those Wald quick release front baskets. I leave it off unless im gonna go shopping and just leave the hanger on. It takes about 3 seconds to put it on and when i get to the store i take it off, carry it in, and fill it up. When it's full it is time to go.

  16. #16
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    In the UK, supermarkets have been using smaller trolleys for light shoppers. These are about the same area as std models but only about 10" deep. The high platform is ideal for standing the pannies up and loading them. I often just chuck everything back into the trolly after paying, and pack the bags afterwards, ensuring that I dont damage squashables or place sharp edges where they damage the pannier material.

  17. #17
    totally louche Bekologist's Avatar
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    America is going to be the last bastion of the disposable plastic bag.

    Gripping our collective hands firmly around thin films of polyethelene, looking for our SUVs in the parking lot of the food co-op.

    "I want my freedom to choose paper OR plastic." (personally, I never seem leave the house without a canvas tote regardless of my locomotion, unless I'm going out on a date.)

    What a joke. Americans myopic wastefulness is apalling. Our 5 percent of the global population uses 25 percent of the worlds oil, etc..

  18. #18
    imminent danger
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    Same as MW. Also as a regular but light shopper I can line up my shopping on the conveyor belt in the order that I want to load it into my pannier.

    I can usually finish my packing while they swip my card and wait for the payment to process.

  19. #19
    Sophomoric Member Roody's Avatar
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    Reusing plastic bags: I reuse them until they die. Use them to keep stuff dry in your backpack. Tie one over your saddle when your bike has to be out in the rain. Make a kerchief to put under your helmet in a sudden downpour (tuck it in good as it looks pretty dorky if it's sticking out). Put veggies in them in the refrigerator. Donate them to your library, resale shops, rummage sales, etc. If you must recycle them, most supermarkets have a collection bin.


    "Think Outside the Cage"

  20. #20
    如果你能讀了這個你講中文 genericbikedude's Avatar
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    I use a messenger bag, and flip it to the front. As the cashier scans items, I pop them into the bag. I make sure that I put the things that go in last at the back of the conveyor belt.

    Edit: the only problem is when I forget small stuff in my bag--its big. I routinely find bulbs of garlic and ginger roots. Once I forgot a stick of butter

  21. #21
    Sophomoric Member Roody's Avatar
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    Yeah--I left a little piece of smoked trout in my backpack once. I couldn't figure out why every cat in Lansing was following me home.


    "Think Outside the Cage"

  22. #22
    pacifist-vegetarian biker
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    Holland is the same as germany in terms of bag. plastics bags cost .15 or 1.00euro buys you a cheay duty resuable vinyl one. My big fat panniers strap on the bike and aren't too easy to get off, so I just bring a couple bags into the store and then drop them back after shopping. No one bags your groceries here so no matter who you are you feel hurried. The key like someone above said is to sort your stuff out on the belt. Cans go first, Bread goes last.

    Back in the states, my panniers are quick on off and I bring them into the store. I get weird looks form all the yuppies at whole foods, but plastic bags just seem to pile up around my apartment. There are so many times when I've been as Best Buy or target just picking up batteries or a cd, and before I can say know its in a bag. such a waste

    I know SF was trying to pass an ordinice to charge for plastic bags, but I think the big chains lobbied against it.
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  23. #23
    Formerly Known as Newbie Juha's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by michaelnel
    I bring my Ortliebs in and put them in the cart along with my helmet, gloves, and glasses. I do my shopping, pay, then take all the stuff back outside and load the panniers.
    Word. Except I tend to load panniers inside the shop, then roll them out with the cart to the bike. I value my Ortliebs too much to leave them on my bike.

    Around here plastic bags are also charged separately, but are worth the cost, rugged and fairly durable. Sometimes I buy one if I need a cheap dry sack for a couple of kayaking trips, for example.

    --J
    To err is human. To moo is bovine.

    Who is this General Failure anyway, and why is he reading my drive?


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  24. #24
    it's my road too, dangit sydney_b's Avatar
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    Cloth bags here unless need to refill plastic bag box for kitchen trash.

  25. #25
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    I know this thread is titled rackpacks in the grocery store, but does anyone use a trailer? I have used my BOB trailer and I love it, just drop the bags in the trailer and go home. It's also easy to lock up. Even if there isn't something to lock it up to, just locking the rear wheel to the trailer prevents most people from even considering stealing it.

    Chris

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