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  1. #1
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    If only there was a solution... :rolleyes:

    A shopper's dream in a Parking Nightmare
    Lack of parking puts the squeeze on Bridgeport Village and other "lifestyle centers"
    Sunday, August 27, 2006
    DANA TIMS
    The Oregonian

    Across the street from Bridgeport Village in Tualatin-Tigard, Connie Watt has watched a mined-out rock quarry's dazzling evolution into one of the state's most successful open-air "lifestyle centers."

    But don't expect to find Watt, owner of nearby Village Inn Pancake House, among Bridgeport Village shoppers. With parking problems at the $250 million retail and entertainment center seemingly growing worse by the day, she has decided it isn't worth the headache.

    "I made the mistake of stopping by on a Saturday evening to buy a couple of items at the grocery store there," Watt said, referring to Wild Oats Natural Marketplace, one of Bridgeport's roughly 85 tenants. "It was terrible. Parking lot rage everywhere. Honking. Screaming. I won't do it again."

    The 15-month-old Bridgeport Village -- Oregon's most recent addition to the lifestyle-center trend -- is not alone when it comes to gridlock. Across the country, other lifestyle centers -- generally defined as anchorless outdoor malls with high-end specialty stores -- have the same problem.

    Building centers close to freeways and desirable high-end demographics -- a five-mile radius around Bridgeport Village captures some of Oregon's highest household incomes -- increasingly means shoe-horning them into properties barely big enough to contain them.

    In that light, the very thing that drives them -- easy access to upper-income populations in dense, established neighborhoods -- is creating parking problems that keep some shoppers away, effectively applying the brakes to the trend.

    Even so, lifestyle centers, with exclusive retailers fronting narrow streets decorated with paving stones and ornate lampposts, remain the upstart centers of choice for developers and shoppers. In the past five years, 82 lifestyle centers have debuted across the country, and 23 regional malls have opened.

    Sales at lifestyle centers also have far outpaced those at traditional malls, according to national experts.

    The popularity of lifestyle centers, in turn, is forcing conventional malls to expand and renovate.

    Washington Square and Clackamas Town Center, for instance, are undertaking major upgrades. At Clackamas, half of the expansion will come in the form of a lifestyle center.

    And with those expansions come more parking problems.

    "We always seem to have ample parking," said Paul DeMarco, Clackamas Town Center's general manager. "But you might have to park out on the edge to find it sometimes."

    Expanding malls have to take their own measures to increase parking. But in many cases, they started out with more room to grow than lifestyle centers.

    Terry McEwen -- whose company, Poag & McEwen Lifestyle Centers, is credited with opening the country's first such center, in 1987 -- said lifestyle centers must confront the parking issue.

    But in sprawl-conscious Portland -- the only area McEwen knows of in the country that tries to limit rather than maximize parking -- it's tough to find enough land for a lifestyle center.

    "We've tried hard to do a site in Portland," he said. "So far, we simply haven't been able to come up with enough land in the right area."

    Bridgeport Village's developers say they are managing the crush.

    "It's pretty clear to everyone that we can use extra spaces," said Fred Bruning, president of CenterCal Properties. "But you could also say that if we weren't so popular, we wouldn't have a parking problem."

    Most evenings and weekends, frustrated shoppers and moviegoers heading for Bridgeport's 18-screen cinema cruise jammed parking lots for 30 minutes or more anxiously looking for a pair of backup lights.

    Increasingly, the center's four-story parking garage, intended for those unable to find anything closer, displays a "full" sign.

    Tenants find solutions

    At the busiest times, even motorists willing to pay $3 for the center's valet parking are turned away.

    "It's crazy," said Portland resident Mike Keller, who with friend Patrick Cowles took half an hour to land a space near McCormick & Schmick's restaurant. "If they are going to invest in all these beautiful shops, they should accommodate the people shopping here. And I can't imagine that the store owners like it any more than we do."

    Some tenants, knowing the problem will only get worse with the imminent opening of more stores, are seeking concessions.

    Mario's, an upscale clothier set to open in about a month, negotiated for a valet parking stand near its front door. Owner Mario Bisio said the convenience should keep customers coming.

    "Oregonians jog 10 miles a day but want to drive two blocks to whatever their destination is," he said, laughing. "Many people will still just circle the lot until they find a spot, but valet service is the way to go."

    A need for more parking may be even more immediate for Wild Oats. The organic foods specialist faces serious competition this fall, when natural foods giant Whole Foods, with its own expansive parking area, opens across the street.

    Wild Oats has taken steps to ease its parking shortage, including a "Wild Ride" shuttle service from the other side of the 28-acre property and a valet service that lets shoppers buy groceries, pull their cars to the curb and have their goods loaded.

    "We obviously wish our parking situation was better," said Sonja Tuitele, Wild Oats' senior director of corporate communications. "But we still think Bridgeport Village is a really good fit for our store."

    Parking ratios for lifestyle centers hover around 4.5 parking spaces for every 1,000 feet of leasable space, according to the New York-based International Council of Shopping Centers. That's fewer than the five spaces per 1,000 square feet at most traditional regional malls, but more than Bridgeport Village's ratio of just below 3.5 per 1,000 feet.

    Bridgeport's Bruning said the center is working hard to ease the shortage. On Thursday and Friday afternoons and on weekends, for instance, the center's 1,500 employees are required to park off-site and take shuttles in. If they don't, their cars are towed.

    And Bruning has just struck a deal with a private landowner and the city of Durham to acquire land next to the center. He hopes to raze two dilapidated houses and add parking for about 250 cars. The lot could be available for this year's holiday season.

    Squeeze was predicted

    Bridgeport Village parking has long been a concern. Before the first plans made it off the drawing board, area developers and retail consultants predicted parking would pose a stumbling block.

    One of several citizens' groups, meeting in late 2001 to review early design proposals, concluded that the number of parking spaces, including those in a five-story parking garage, represented, at best, the minimum.

    The garage was scaled back to four stories when Durham, which abuts Bridgeport's western boundary, complained that a five-story garage would tower over buildings in the area. The change meant a loss of more than 200 spaces.

    City officials now say they may have overreacted.

    "In retrospect, another story may not have made much difference," said Roland Signett, Durham city administrator. "But at the time, from the plans we saw, it looked monstrous."

    Developers also initially planned to build an underground garage. But the estimated $20 million cost to remove thousands of cubic feet of loose fill imported onto the site under the auspices of then-landowner Washington County forced developers to scrap the idea, Bruning said.

    Any notion of resurrecting plans for underground parking died in early 2003, when tests showed substantial amounts of methane gas trapped beneath the fill. Active and passive methane-ventilation systems costing more than $6 million now snake beneath the property.

    No shortage of customers

    Regardless of a budding reputation as a parking nightmare, Bridgeport Village packs in customers. Sales, now near $700 per square foot a year, make it one of the hottest retail locations in the region, said Mark New, whose company, New & Neville Real Estate Services, is one of Bridgeport's leasing agents.

    Nationally, successful lifestyle centers rack up $400 to $500 in average sales per square foot, McEwen said. Regional malls, by contrast, range in the mid-$300s.

    One recent afternoon, Lorraine Beyerlein, 81, said she had driven from Corvallis to check out Cold Water Creek, a women's clothing shop. She said she "got lucky" when a car left a spot just as she cruised past.

    A few minutes later, Hillsboro resident Brett Robichaud strolled by, his sleepy 3-year-old daughter, Sabine, cradled in his arms. The pair headed toward an early dinner at Romano's Macaroni Grill.

    Robichaud recalled that, on his first trip to the center, he found the parking lot so frustrating that he vowed never to return.

    "We ended up liking the restaurant so much that we decided to come back," he said. "But it's a problem, definitely. Anyone not as dedicated as we are is going to say forget it."

    You can reach Dana Tims at 503-294-5973 or by e-mail at danatims@news.oregonian.com


    ©2006 The Oregonian

  2. #2
    tired donnamb's Avatar
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  3. #3
    tired donnamb's Avatar
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    They should hope these guys open a store in Portland. Maybe in Bridgeport Village?

    There's at least one person in Portland with the right idea.

  4. #4
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    Man, her bike makes my utility bike project look like a piker in comparison!

    I can't believe that in a situation where a shopping center-- er, I mean "lifestyle center"-- is surrounded by dense affluent neighborhoods, nobody has proposed the obvious. Of course, not every person can bike to the "lifestyle center," nor will it be practical in many instances, but it will be practical, and possible, in many, perhaps even most instances.

    So people drive a few blocks, only to circle endlessly, looking for a parking space, fighting gridlock and parking rage, all so they can buy a few items at Wild Oats or relax with a latte...

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    This is real cycling advocacy! It was lack of parking spots that made me into a cyclist.

    Paul

  6. #6
    J E R S E Y S B E S T Jerseysbest's Avatar
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    WTF is a lifestyle center? Is that the PC term for strip-mall?
    Quote Originally Posted by SingingSabre View Post
    Cheating: a symptom of the problem.

  7. #7
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    It's a center welcoming people to the consumerist lifestyle ...

  8. #8
    Crankenstein bmclaughlin807's Avatar
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    I would say that the new Belmar center here in Lakewood qualifies... It's actually pretty cool:

    Check it out here!
    "There is no greater wonder than the way the face and character of a woman fit so perfectly in a man's mind, and stay there, and he could never tell you why. It just seems it was the thing he most wanted." Robert Louis Stevenson

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerseysbest
    WTF is a lifestyle center? Is that the PC term for strip-mall?
    It's described in the article.

  10. #10
    Take Your Lane MaxBender's Avatar
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    Any tips on how to strap a 68" Plasma TV on the back of a Cannondale commuter?
    just a sig test !

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaxBender
    Any tips on how to strap a 68" Plasma TV on the back of a Cannondale commuter?
    That's probably one of those rare instances where a car would come in handy at the lifestyle center.

  12. #12
    Crankenstein bmclaughlin807's Avatar
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    Just borrow one of those 8' long bike trailers.... you can haul refridgerators on them, I doubt a plasma would be much different.
    "There is no greater wonder than the way the face and character of a woman fit so perfectly in a man's mind, and stay there, and he could never tell you why. It just seems it was the thing he most wanted." Robert Louis Stevenson

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    I'm still really attracted to this beauty...




    The rider is rather attractive too.

  14. #14
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    I'm sorry, but that article made my flesh crawl. Okay, I laughed some, too. It's funny to think that it didn't seem to occur to anyone to park on some street nearby and walk in, even if they were stupid enough to drive there. But mostly I was grossed out by the spoiled, wussy sense of entitlement. It sort of makes me think maybe Marx had the right idea after all...
    If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.

  15. #15
    tired donnamb's Avatar
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    Here's a Bakfiets that could do the job. They're not all just for kids.


    There is something about the motor vehicle that has hampered the human imagination so severely. Remember how there only used to be one or two kinds of potatoes available in grocery stores? They were so monotonous and I never wanted to eat them. Now all the variety has made them yummy to me again. I'm not suggesting we get rid of all motor vehicles, just that we consider that what has become our dominant form of transportation isn't the best one for all our activities. Take Bridgeport Village, for example. Sure, you could get a 68" plasma TV there and as Blue Order said, a motor vehicle may well be the easiest way to get it home. But what if you're just going to the Apple Store to buy a cord for your iPod or buying groceries at Wild Oats? You could even transport something much larger by bike that isn't as delicate as a plasma screen TV.

    As to the limitations of a Cannondale commuter, I personally think someone needs to slap them upside the head for helping to maintain the boring, tedious, status quo that is bicycle selection in North America.

  16. #16
    tsl
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    What really got me in that article was the bit about the "grocery valet" where your goodies are taken outside to be loaded in you car for you. Like that's some kind of new millenium innovation!

    I remember riding to the grocery store with my grandmother in her brand new pearl white 1962 Oldsmobile Delta 88 (or was it a Rocket 88?) when we had the same thing at EVERY grocery store. The bag boy put two bags each into a plastic tub (plastic--very modern for the time) gave you a plastic claim card for each tub and put them on a conveyor belt that took them outside. There, you pulled-up, popped the trunk (or gave your keys to the kid if you had a lesser vehicle) gave your claim cards to another boy who loaded your bags into the trunk.

    Everything old is new again...
    My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything.
    The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library.—Peter Golkin


    Lucky for me, I work at a library and bike to work.

  17. #17
    Senior Member wahoonc's Avatar
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    These "lifestyle" centers used to be called...DOWNTOWN! our smalltown is in process of starting a dowtown revitalization, I hope it works. The area is not exactly high income I work on a few of these centers (not by choice, belieeeveee me!) They are a PITA and most of them ARE NOT accessible for cyclists, at least not the ones I have seen. All they have leading into them are multilane, high traffic count roads and in many cases off ramps from freeways I have taken to doing most of my shopping on line and avoid the crowds.

    Aaron
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  18. #18
    Dare to be weird!
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    There's one small advantage to having a parking lot in front of stores. In such cases, the store owner has the power to eject bums and panhandlers because the front area is private property. Bums are a big problem in many otherwise wonderful old downtown areas.

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    I covet those hub-geared fully encased chains

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    This sort of reminds me of the grocery store near me. The parking lot is divided into two parts. The part furthest away from the doors never has cars in it. The other half is always full, and the funny part is that people will circle the close half of the parking lot until they find a spot and wont even consider using the far half of the lot. The funny part is that the far end of the lot will make you walk an extra 20 metres but in all but a few cases it is not used for more than a taxi stand.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Platy
    There's one small advantage to having a parking lot in front of stores. In such cases, the store owner has the power to eject bums and panhandlers because the front area is private property. Bums are a big problem in many otherwise wonderful old downtown areas.
    When I fly home to visit my mother (it's car-free, right? ), she enjoys going to a restaurant in one of these centers. It's called Santana Row, but I've always called it Phonytown, because it's built to look like a downtown, has loads of shops, restaurants, apartments, a public square, bands playing... It looks like a town, but it's not a town. So I call it Phonytown, as in "Let's go out to eat." "Where are we going? Phonytown?"

    Anyway, I thought the entire concept was ridiculous, until I realized the appeal. When I walk through downtown Portland, I'm accosted by panhandlers every few feet. Gutter punks (that's what they call themselves) lay sprawled across the sidewalk "spanging." Drunks sleep in doorways, I often have to walk around the vomit and urine they leave on the sidewalk, the deranged stand on the corner shouting at passersby, just like the street corner preachers...

    And when you go to Phonytown, you don't have to deal with any of that. It's a clean, safe, controlled environment. You get many of the pluses of city living, and none of the minuses. You even get free parking. When I realized that, i understood why Phonytown is so popular.

  22. #22
    Pedal Power!
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    Quote Originally Posted by !!Comatoa$ted
    This sort of reminds me of the grocery store near me. The parking lot is divided into two parts. The part furthest away from the doors never has cars in it. The other half is always full, and the funny part is that people will circle the close half of the parking lot until they find a spot and wont even consider using the far half of the lot. The funny part is that the far end of the lot will make you walk an extra 20 metres but in all but a few cases it is not used for more than a taxi stand.
    So true!
    Head for the furthest car parking space at my nearest 'mall' and you can guarantee to get a space.
    People will walk a couple of miles around all the shops, but not those extra few yards to get to the front door!

  23. #23
    put our Heads Together cerewa's Avatar
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    WTF is a lifestyle center? Is that the PC term for strip-mall?
    I think it's a term for a strip-mall in which people spend their oodles of yuppy money to buy consumerist products which they hope will make them appear more socially/environmentally responsible.
    Some awesome folks who are working to give Haitians the ability to manage their safety and their lives:
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  24. #24
    Immoderator KrisPistofferson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cerewa
    I think it's a term for a strip-mall in which people spend their oodles of yuppy money to buy consumerist products which they hope will make them appear more socially/environmentally responsible.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bikeforums
    Your rights end where another poster's feelings begin.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MaxBender
    Any tips on how to strap a 68" Plasma TV on the back of a Cannondale commuter?
    Mail order. Cheaper and probably faster with much less effort on your part. In fact, there is NO WAY I would even attempt to carry that much weight with or without a car.

    Then again, I don't watch television which is why I have no need to shop at those expensive stores in the first place. The people visiting that mall have been programmed into thinking they need those costly products in their lives.

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