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  1. #1
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    Locking a bike overnight??

    I've been thinking about locking my bike overnight near the train station where I work. Has anyone done this succesfully for a long time? Any tips to keep my ride from being stolen!?

  2. #2
    Senior Member aMull's Avatar
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    I have left by bike overnight at school a few times, never got stolen. I am not sure about a train station though.

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    You need a new bike supcom's Avatar
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    Much depends on where the area around the train station. However, a thief can be sure that a bike sitting at a station at midnight is not going to be claimed by the owner before dawn. And if theives don't get it. there's always the possibility of vandalism.

    Does your train station have any bike lockers that will keep your bike out of site? If not,, then perhaps you should consider getting a folding bike and taking it with you.

  4. #4
    bragi bragi's Avatar
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    It depends. I've left my bike locked up at a public marina for over a week before, but it's a busy place, and my bike isn't really worth stealing (which is one of the reasons I bought it). If the bike is a really nice one, and the area around the train station is high crime, I'd suggest you just leave the bike at home and take a bus to the station. Otherwise, lock it in an area with lots of light and heavy pedestrian traffic. (The earlier suggestion about bike lockers is a good one, too.)
    If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.

  5. #5
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    What kind of bike is it? If it's even close to modern looking, I wouldn't leave it there. I'd pick up an old beater bike for overnight duty.

    Even if you used two locks, they can still strip your bike down to the wheels and frame by the time you see it again. Goodbye brifters, cranks, derailleurs...

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrackSmart
    What kind of bike is it? If it's even close to modern looking, I wouldn't leave it there. I'd pick up an old beater bike for overnight duty.

    Even if you used two locks, they can still strip your bike down to the wheels and frame by the time you see it again. Goodbye brifters, cranks, derailleurs...

    Well actually its an 80s Fuji that I converted to single speed, pretty much a beater, nice bike though but probably wouldnt be worth much. Thinking about getting one of those Kryptonite New York lock chains or Ulocks. I would probably put a quick release seat to take with me and take the pedals as well.

  7. #7
    Senior Member cranky's Avatar
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    After years of reading stories in forums of people having their bikes get stolen, I decided that the best way to prevent it from happening is to keep it inside. Make sure the beater you leave out there truly is one you can live without.

    I think thieves recognize a single speed conversion as worthwhile booty.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by PIZZ
    Well actually its an 80s Fuji that I converted to single speed, pretty much a beater, nice bike though but probably wouldnt be worth much. Thinking about getting one of those Kryptonite New York lock chains or Ulocks. I would probably put a quick release seat to take with me and take the pedals as well.

    Well, in that case, I think an overnight lock-up would be okay assuming that the area is well-lit and well-travelled. An 80's fuji with no shifting mechanisms to steal (single speed!), sounds exactly like something you'd use for getting around town or to the train station.

    Bike locks buy you time, not security. About 2 minutes for a cheap cable lock. Probably 5 minutes for a cheap U-lock. Maybe 20 minutes for a good quality U-lock. I personally have a normal Kryptonite U-lock. It's not very good, but I won it at "bike to work day" one year. I use it because it was free and my bike is cheap.

    If I were to BUY a new lock for overnight parking it would be the OnGuard Bulldog Mini or Pitbull Mini. Small (means it's harder to get leverage tools onto), relatively light weight (about 2 pounds I think). Tough as nails. Oh yeah, only about $20. You'd still want something to secure your front wheel. This is a nice combo:

    http://www.amazon.com/OnGuard-Bulldo...sporting-goods

    http://www.amazon.com/OnGuard-PitBul...659234?ie=UTF8






    From a previous post:


    alanbikehouston

    When someone buys a nice bike, often their first question is: What is the "best bike lock" I can buy? Or, who makes the "strongest bicycle lock" money can buy?

    The April 2005 issue of UK's "Cycling Plus" included the results of their 2005 lock tests. Cycling Plus tested the locks by trying to break them with manual tools favored by crooks and then cutting them with the type of portable, battery-operated power tools used by crooks.

    SHORT VERSION OF TEST RESULTS: The Kryptonite New York 3000 U-lock is the "best bike lock" and the "strongest bicycle lock" for high crime areas and an expensive bike.

    The OnGuard Bulldog Mini U-lock (just $24 at REI) is the "best bike lock", and for its low price, "the strongest bicycle lock" for average neighborhoods and for less expensive expensive bikes.

    The European models: the Squire Paramount Plus, and the Axa-Basta Secu-City Plus model did almost as well as the New York lock. The German-designed mid-price Abus lock, was only "average" against power tools.

    LOOONG VERSION OF TEST RESULTS: The tests using manual tools had one scary and surprising result: the locks were so strong that when heavy force was applied to the locks, the frame of the bike got mangled, while the locks remained in good shape.

    To prevent damage to the frame, and to fully protect both the frame and rear wheel, position your lock around the rear wheel, just behind (but not around) the seat tube. That locking procedure secures both the frame and rear wheel. If a crook uses a prying method, he might bend the wheel, but he won't damage the frame.


    HOW TO CORRECTLY LOCK YOUR BIKE by Sheldon Brown:

    www.sheldonbrown.com/lock-strategy.html
    Last edited by TrackSmart; 09-05-06 at 07:32 PM.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by cranky
    After years of reading stories in forums of people having their bikes get stolen, I decided that the best way to prevent it from happening is to keep it inside.
    After many sleepless nights, laying awake wondering if a thief was cutting the lock on my storage locker and making off with my beloved 1977 Motobecane-- nights in which I usually found it necessary to inspect the storage locker at 3 A.M.-- I finally brought my bike inside. No more sleepless nights.

    Except when I'm up late planning my upgrades on my growing fleet.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Order
    After many sleepless nights, laying awake wondering if a thief was cutting the lock on my storage locker and making off with my beloved 1977 Motobecane-- nights in which I usually found it necessary to inspect the storage locker at 3 A.M.-- I finally brought my bike inside. No more sleepless nights.

    Except when I'm up late planning my upgrades on my growing fleet.

    All of this is true, but still, some people have no choice depending on their work or commuting situation. In that case 1) Make sure the bike isn't worth much, 2) Lock it in a well-lit, well-travelled area, and 3) Make sure it's not worth much! (see, the cheapness part is important, I listed it again. If it's worth real money, they WILL take it.)

    At that point, you just take your chances. Theft is still possible, but most thieves aren't going to waste their time on your old and well-locked beater which is also sitting in a conspicous place. Not worth the risk for such small reward.

  11. #11
    Mr. Maximan1 maximan1's Avatar
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    If you have a bike with like removable wheels take them off and bring them into your office. Or hide a wireless camera or something like that to keep an eye out for your bike all the time.

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